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IT Debate: Avoiding common mistakes in m

By itdebate ·
The popularity of telecommuting can mean higher training costs and greater support challenges. Do you think that enterprises can easily integrate remote access technology? What strategies does your enterprise use to make mobile computing work smoothly?

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IT Debate: Avoiding common mistakes in m

by calves In reply to IT Debate: Avoiding commo ...

The technology is out there! How much do you want to spend?
Since my current organization does not require a great deal of security, my approach is based on cost. Makes me look good, and makes the boss happy.
For my remote offices, I have a localDSL and a BDC with RRAS with a permanent connection to the Main office.
I do all the syncronizations through it, the remote offices have access to all the resources at the main office, and vice-versa.
For the roadwarriors, I have a national ISP provider, and a VPN connection on the desktop. At the office I use the proper authentication protocols and scripts, so that, my roadwarrior users don't need to be trained. They use the ISP software to find a local number for the internet, once they VPN into the network, the scripts set their mappings, email works great, that is all they care.

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IT Debate: Avoiding common mistakes in m

by itdebate In reply to IT Debate: Avoiding commo ...
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IT Debate: Avoiding common mistakes in m

by mwb In reply to IT Debate: Avoiding commo ...

In my opinion, the key to effective telecommuting and remote access is to create standards and centralize the computing power and support. A thin client solution such as Citrix or Terminal services ensures that the user needs only an avenue to the Internet. Be that web access, PDA, PC it really doesn’t matter and the tech support required to completely install and connect the client software takes all of 20 minutes. Single-user Extranets such as MS Outlook Web Access and HP OpenView take that a step further, just find a web browser anywhere in the world and you are fine. Standards play a big part in support because any good tech support person knows that Win9x will generate more support calls caused by user error than Win NT/2000. Simply recommending one ISP over another will save your users the revelation that ICA won’t work through some versions of AOL. The point being that good planning and the implementation of standards can eliminate the need for large amounts of training.

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IT Debate: Avoiding common mistakes in m

by itdebate In reply to IT Debate: Avoiding commo ...
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IT Debate: Avoiding common mistakes in m

by plantogo2000 In reply to IT Debate: Avoiding commo ...

This is a company and IS&T management strategic question. Can a company “not afford” to provide telecommuting must be addressed and it follows that some graduated plan needs to be developed that the company can justify.

A proposed strategy would be a matrix organization formed as a new group of existing employees to focus the necessary training, support, and business processes and to keep track of budget costs. Managing the effort as a project with identified strategic objectives accountable to the CIO with dotted line relationship to each of the managers whose personnel are involved would provide the focus and leadership necessary. The project team would include persons actually involved in telecommuting who would also serve as help desk personnel for subsequent telecommuting personnel.

Consideration of a telecommuting newsletter may also help in communicating changes and improvements in the basic business process as the program matures to be a sop.

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IT Debate: Avoiding common mistakes in m

by itdebate In reply to IT Debate: Avoiding commo ...
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IT Debate: Avoiding common mistakes in m

by janmann In reply to IT Debate: Avoiding commo ...

While I agree with the gist of the Gartner article, there's a bit too much emphasis on the hysterical -- you know, the "sky is falling" syndrome. Simple, economical, and effective answers are available. For example, a company-provided diskless terminal (with the operating system on a CD or internally hardcoded) could access all required apps and data via Citrix or Terminal services while using low-bandwidth connections. This would allow all apps and data to remain at the company site when not being viewed. Positive user ID at both the client and network, along with network access rights would remain as issues, but those issues are common to all network accesses, not just RAS. A stolen terminal containing an embedded identifier and only encrypted data doesn't provide a lot of risk to worry about. And if local data pre-storage is needed, how about just adding a DVD player to that diskless workstation and providing an encrypted DVD? As for PDAs, why would any sane company allow any sensitive corporate

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IT Debate: Avoiding common mistakes in m

by itdebate In reply to IT Debate: Avoiding commo ...

Your answer was featured in our IT Debate TechMail. To receive your free subscription to the IT Debate TechMail, sign up at http://www.techrepublic.com/techmails.jhtml

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IT Debate: Avoiding common mistakes in m

by drasch In reply to IT Debate: Avoiding commo ...

A firewall and basic (sometimes overlooked) password security is essential. Another overlooked requirement is a contingency planning disaster recovery plan that is tested. If a breach happens (and it it usually internal rather than external), a tested recovery plan is critical.

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IT Debate: Avoiding common mistakes in m

by itdebate In reply to IT Debate: Avoiding commo ...

Your answer was featured in our IT Debate TechMail. To receive your free subscription to the IT Debate TechMail, sign up at http://www.techrepublic.com/techmails.jhtml

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