General discussion

Locked

IT Debate: Managed LAN services

By itdebate ·
Gartner believes that LAN utility services are a natural extension of router management and converged network services in the wide-area network. Gartner also maintains that enterprises looking to reduce operational complexity in the LAN should evaluate those new services. Would you outsource your LAN? What would convince you to use LAN utility services?cost savings? What would be your biggest fear? You can read the related Gartner article, which will be posted 3:00 AM Wednesday, at http://www.techrepublic.com/article.jhtml?id=r006200011108ggp01.htm

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

8 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  
| Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

IT Debate: Managed LAN services

by samuelbrooks In reply to IT Debate: Managed LAN se ...

The only reason to outsource your LAN is if you have outsourced your whole IT Department. Otherwise, what would your IT people do? I cannot see myself outsourcing my local LAN, without the vendor having a full time person on staff at my location.I have 50 PC's, and 12 File Servers. Our corporate office also provides thin client access for the rest of the enterprise. Any changes to the local LAN can have dramatic affects on the thin client activity. I just do not see where cost savings would be achieved by outsourcing this. It would take more time to explain the daily changes to an outsourced vendor then it does just to fix them.

Collapse -

IT Debate: Managed LAN services

by itdebate In reply to IT Debate: Managed LAN se ...

Your answer was featured in our IT Debate TechMail. To receive your free subscription to the IT Debate TechMail, sign up at http://www.techrepublic.com/techmails.jhtml

Collapse -

IT Debate: Managed LAN services

by dlw6 In reply to IT Debate: Managed LAN se ...

I concur with Mr Brooks.

I worked 18 months in an IT dept where we owned over 100 users, over 100 desktops, and 2 domain controllers but did not own the LAN. We had to call in work orders for any problems or to have ports turned on. It always took longer than if we'd done the work ourselves, and increased the risk of error because of longer lines of communication.

Having said that, it would take a lot of convincing to outsource a LAN -- it's not that complicated and any IT support team can learn to do it.

It is a bit easier to accept outsourcing for a CAN or WAN because of the wider variety of equipment and unique expertise required. You might save time and/or training cost over learning and maintaining the edge equipment yourself.

The fear with outsourcing is security and quality of service. The contract should be specific with respect to the provider's responsibilities and any reparations resulting from failure to meet those responsibilities.

Good fortune,
Don

Collapse -

IT Debate: Managed LAN services

by itdebate In reply to IT Debate: Managed LAN se ...

Poster rated this answer

Collapse -

IT Debate: Managed LAN services

by itdebate In reply to IT Debate: Managed LAN se ...

The correct URL for the related Gartner article is http://www.techrepublic.com/article.jhtml?id=r00620001108ggp01.htm

Collapse -

IT Debate: Managed LAN services

by McKayTech In reply to IT Debate: Managed LAN se ...

I formerly worked for a company that provided remote LAN management services. If understood and implemented properly, these services can be a cost-effective way for SMALL networks to receive maintenance and monitoring that would otherwise not be feasible.

Outsourcing these functions to a reputable company can also provide some stability and insurance against disruption of business in the event of a sudden change of on-site IS personnel. In fact, one of the easiest ways to find customers for these services is to talk with company officials whose networks have been held hostage by a network administrator or where someone has left and taken the passwords with them.

Personally, I would consider outsourcing LAN management either with primary responsibility in the case of a small LAN with no on-site IS presence or with secondary responsibility in a larger LAN with some on-site IS presence.

It is critical, however, to develop a clear understanding of what the service covers and what it does not and that is best accomplished by drafting a rigorously detailed Service Level Agreement that addresses security, response times, roles, responsibilities and a problem clearance procedure.


paul

Collapse -

IT Debate: Managed LAN services

by itdebate In reply to IT Debate: Managed LAN se ...

Your answer was featured in our IT Debate TechMail. To receive your free subscription to the IT Debate TechMail, sign up at http://www.techrepublic.com/techmails.jhtml

Collapse -

IT Debate: Managed LAN services

by itdebate In reply to IT Debate: Managed LAN se ...

This question was closed by the author

Back to Networks Forum
8 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  

Related Discussions

Related Forums