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First post - Where am I?

by Jesper Johansson In reply to Jesper's TechRepublic Blo ...

<P>Given the amount of travel I do I thought it made sense to make the first post a schedule of where I will be. If you are interested in meeting with me while I am in one of these places, send me a message and I'll see what we can do. I'll try to keep this schedule up to date as it changes.</P>
<UL style="MARGIN-TOP: 0in" type=disc>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>August 21-26 ? TechEd Asia in Singapore</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>August 27-31 ? <A href="http://www.microsoft.com/nz/teched/">TechEd New Zealand</A></FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>August 31-September 6 ? <A href="http://www.microsoft.com/australia/teched">TechEd Australia</A></FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>September 22-25 ? <A href="http://www.microsoft.com/china/teched/">TechEd China</A> in Beijing</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>September 26-30 ? <A href="http://www.microsoft.com/taiwan/events/teched">TechEd Taiwan</A> in Taipei</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>October 1-7 ? <A href="http://www.microsoft.com/hk/teched2005">TechEd Hong Kong</A></FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>October 10-12 ? Customer meetings in London</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>October 13 ? German academic conference in Darmstadt</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>October 14 ? Serbian security event in Belgrade</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>October 21-27 ? <I style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">tentative </I>TechEd South Africa, Sun City</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>November 3-4 Customer meetings in Minneapolis </FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>November 14-18 ? <A href="http://www.mseventseurope.com/msitforum/05/pre/content/default.aspx">IT Forum</A> in Barcelona</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>November 28 ? December 2 ? Swedish security summit and customer meetings, Stockholm</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>December 5 ? 31 ? Vacation</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2>December 13-14 ? Security Summit East in Washington DC</FONT></LI></UL><img src="http://blogs.technet.com/aggbug.aspx?PostID=409511" width="1" height="1"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://blogs.technet.com/jesper_johansson/archive/2005/08/19/409511.aspx">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Password policies not honored when disconnected

by Jesper Johansson In reply to Jesper's TechRepublic Blo ...

<P>It's funny how some things seem so obvious to many of us who work at the mothership that we don't seem to realize they are not obvious to others. A couple of days ago we received a report that password policies were not being honored when a domain member is not connected to the domain. Specifically, the "Maximum password age" setting was configured on the domain and the password had expired, but the user received no notification when logging on. The user was using a domain account that was cached on the client using the cached credentials ("Number of previous logons to cache" setting) feature. </P>
<P>Well, this was well known, at least to some, and it makes a lot of sense really. If the password has expired, you must create a new one. However, you cannot create a new one unless you are connected to a domain controller. Therefore, since you cannot create a new one, you do not get notified that the password has expired until you actually connect back to the domain. In other words, the "Maximum password age" setting is only honored when you are connected to the domain. If you log on to a disconnected client and subsequently reconnect, you will only get a prompt when you either log off and back on, or when you lock and unlock the system. If you run a network and find this unacceptable, you may want to consider using a script on your VPN server that prompts the user to change their password. This can be done using a post-connect script, for instance.</P>
<P>The same behavior happens with account lockout settings. Of course, IMNSHO, you should never set yourself up for a trivial denial of service by using account lockout anyway. Use <A href="http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/columns/secmgmt/sm1004.mspx">good passwords </A>instead, and you won't need to worry about account lockout.</P><img src="http://blogs.technet.com/aggbug.aspx?PostID=409512" width="1" height="1"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://blogs.technet.com/jesper_johansson/archive/2005/08/19/409512.aspx">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Death by PowerPoint

by Jesper Johansson In reply to Jesper's TechRepublic Blo ...

<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt"><FONT size=2>I'm at yet another event, and this time I decided to go see a few of the other sessions instead of just trying to find as much free food as possible between my own presentations. This experience brought to mind an old concept: "Death by PowerPoint." It is almost embarrassing how some people use PowerPoint. <a href="http://blogs.technet.com/steriley">Steve Riley</A> frequently refers to e-mail as "the place where knowledge goes to die." Well Steve, you have it wrong. Nothing kills knowledge as fast as putting it in PowerPoint.</FONT></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt"><FONT size=2>Some of the most egregious ways to use PowerPoint I have seen include:</FONT></P>
<UL style="MARGIN-TOP: 0in" type=disc>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">PowerPoint is NOT a word processor!</B> The point of a PowerPoint slide is not to cram as much information into a single slide as possible. The idea of a slide is to have memory joggers that trigger thinking in the audience. That means you do not need to even have complete sentences (although it is a bonus if the words are spelled correctly). Simple statements work just fine</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">Most of your audience probably knows how to read</B> ? A corollary to the thinking that PowerPoint is a word processor is that far too many presenters stand on stage reading the slides. It turns out that most of the audience members probably are literate and can read the slides for themselves. The purpose of a presentation is not to do so for them. If you want to read to people, go to the reading hour at the local library. A presentation is about explaining things to people that go above and beyond what they get in the slides. If it weren't they may as well just get your slides and read them in the comfort of their own office, home, boat, or bathroom.</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">A picture is worth a thousand words, possibly more </B>? Just because PowerPoint has bullets is no reason to use them. There is no way you can convey as much information in a slide full of bullets as you can in a slide with a single picture on it. Try this next time, put a picture in instead of the bullets and then talk about the picture. People will find it much more interesting and much more informative. As a bonus, it makes it more worthwhile to come to the presentation as opposed to just downloading the slides ? making you a more important person to have at the event.</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">It's a good idea to know your presentation </B>? statements like "oops, what is that slide doing here" or "I don't really know what this point is trying to say" are never a good thing in a presentation. Generally speaking, an audience that went through the time and effort to attend your presentation expects you to have spent at least that much time preparing for it. Taking someone else's presentation and just standing up and reading the slides as they show up is typically not going to work out too well. </FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">Bullets are bad, stories are good</B> ? There is no law that says everything you say has to fit in a bullet. In fact, teaching by bullet points was never one of the more interesting in school was it? Think back to the classes that you enjoyed ? most of the time they were the ones were the teacher related the material to real life, by telling a story that illustrated the points. Which would you rather hear? An sound-bite explanation of the four pieces that need to be proven in a lawsuit over negligence, or a story about how someone was negligent and got sued over it?</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">The actual content of your presentation is much more important than the slide show template you used! </B>? I do about 80 conference presentations a year. For some reason, every single event feels that they must have a unique PowerPoint template for their slides. It takes anywhere from 15 minutes to two hours to reapply a template, depending on the presentation and what you have done in it. That is two hours that could be profitably spent doing other things, like say putting in content that the audience would care about as opposed to setting it in a template they don't care about. That is two weeks of my time a year that I can't create information and transfer knowledge, but instead spend trying to figure out why somebody decided that a red font on a blue background was a good idea.</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">The purpose of the three-pane view is not so you can see which the next slide is</B> ? PowerPoint's three-pane view is great ? for building presentations. It is not there as a substitute for rehearsals so you can tell which the next slide is. Hit F5 and use PowerPoint the way it was designed. If you're already in three-pane view by the time you read this, hit shift-F5 and it will start the slideshow from the current slide.</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">Don't put your audience in pain.</B> ? OK, so the general idea is to transfer knowledge. If you make the audience's collective eyes bleed by putting up white slides with a black font, something which is just horribly painful to look at in a dark room, you are much less likely to actually convey any points since they will be trying to look away from the screen the whole time.</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">Be conscious people with disabilities</B> ? Most disabilities do not interfere with a presentation. However, some do. For instance, red text on a blue background is impossible to see for people who are color blind since it won't stop moving. Red text on black has the same effect, and red text on green simply disappears unless they are completely red and completely green, in which case the red text just jumps around a lot instead. </FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">It is not a requirement to have at least one slide in each presentation that nobody can read</B> ? You do not have to have a slide that nobody can read, contrary to popular opinion. That is what handouts are for. If people can't read it, why put it on the screen? Why waste the audience's time with it?</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">12-point font is not appropriate</B> ? 12-point font can't be read unless you are right in front of the slide, in which case you need to move your head far too much. 14 points is bare minimum. Ideally, don't go below 18.</FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in"><FONT size=2><B style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">There is no contest as to who can use the most fonts </B>? You won't get dinged if you don't use 12 different fonts in a single slide. One or two is perfectly fine and actually makes the slide readable instead, an extra bonus.</FONT></LI></UL>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 10pt 0in 0pt"><FONT size=2>Do you have a favorite story about "Death by PowerPoint?" Let me know! Post a comment or send me an e-mail if you don't want it posted.</FONT></P><img src="http://blogs.technet.com/aggbug.aspx?PostID=409769" width="1" height="1"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://blogs.technet.com/jesper_johansson/archive/2005/08/24/Death_by_PowerPoint.aspx">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Death by PowerPoint

by RayJeff In reply to Death by PowerPoint

I need to show this to the faculty in my division. I think it will help
them when they start to use PowerPoint presentations during their
lectures. And it will be especially helpful because they are
computer-illterate. WIll make my job easier.

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Death by PowerPoint

by keithn In reply to Death by PowerPoint

<p>Try telling attornies why they shouldn't fill every slide up with multiple levels of bullets!!  Then they want each bullet to appear a different way!  </p>
<p>A few weeks ago I took a 20-slide presentation one of the attorneys prepared and whittled it down to 9 slides.  I also removed all of the animations except for page transitions.</p>
<p>I had the attorney sit in the back of our Events Center, where I presented his original slide show, followed by the revised presentation.  He chose to go with the revised show.</p>
<p>Keith Nelson - Boston MA</p>

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Death by PowerPoint

by cbell In reply to Death by PowerPoint

My all time pet peeve is not in your list.  Animations are nice, but make them STOP!  I sat through a meeting this week with multiple animations on one slide, introduced one line at a time, but none of the previous animations stopped.  After 10 minutes there were 5 animations running at the same time of the slide.  It is distracting and lost my interest in the presentation.

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Death by PowerPoint

by panzrwagn In reply to Death by PowerPoint

<p>No discussion of the problems and limitations of Powerpoint is incomplete without mentioning Edward Tufte's monograph on "the Cognitive Style of Powerpoint":</p>
<p>"...slideware often reduces the analytical quality of presentations. In particular, the popular PowerPoint templates (ready-made designs) usually weaken verbal and spatial reasoning, and almost always corrupt statistical analysis."</p>
<p>But hey, he's only the world expert on visual presentation of data.</p>

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Death by PowerPoint

by Jesper Johansson In reply to Death by PowerPoint

<p>Good comments folks! I particularly like the part about Ed Tufte. I have not yet seen him, but I have friends that have. They say he is amazing! I really want to see this. Even though I never saw him, he actually influenced my style already. I have a lot more pictures and a lot less bullets now.</p>
<p>On the animations, that would be another "don't" wouldn't it? I can't stand it when people over-animate slides. In kindergarten (and sophmore year in college) they always covered the bullets on the overhead transparencies that had not yet been discussed. I think the idea was that people were not considered mature enough to read at their own pace and still pay attention. I'd like to think that most audiences today are mature enough to handle that, especially if the slide is well designed.</p>

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Security sins in computer products

by Jesper Johansson In reply to Jesper's TechRepublic Blo ...

<P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">So I got a new wireless router for my house today and was absolutely appalled at the way they have treated security in the thing. Now, this is not unique at all. I have tried most of the other common home routers as well, and they all sin in about the same ways. Frankly, I have yet to find a wireless product that does security as well as the venerable Microsoft MN-500 802.11b router. Of course, the MS device only does WEP, which is pretty much equivalent to no security at all these days, but when it came out, that was all there was, and it was on by default, and ordinary mortals could actually set it up. Not so with the recent crop of products. Here are some particularly egregious issues:<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o></o></SPAN></FONT></P>
<OL style="MARGIN-TOP: 0in" type=1>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1"><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">This is an excerpt from the manual<o></o></SPAN></FONT> </LI></OL>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN-LEFT: 0.25in"><B><FONT face=Arial color=#003399 size=4><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold; FONT-SIZE: 13pt; COLOR: #003399; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Administrator Password</SPAN></FONT></B><BR><FONT face=Verdana color=#003366 size=1><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; COLOR: #003366; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">The Router ships with NO password entered. If you wish to add a password for more security, you can set a password here. Keep your password in a safe place, as you will need this password if you need to log into the router in the future. It is also recommended that you set a password if you plan to use the Remote management feature of this Router.</SPAN></FONT></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN-LEFT: 0.25in"><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Let me get this straight; if I wish to have security, I may optionally configure it? Why is security optional? What kinds of passwords might this thing support? There is no mention of it in the manual. However, since it is web-based, I presume it can?t have special characters in it since those get to be URL encoded. Oh, and the walkthrough configuration wizard thingie, that ensures you get a wireless network that is shared with every neighbor that can find it (which is a large number with a MIMO router like this one) does not allow you to set a password.<o></o></SPAN></FONT></P>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN-LEFT: 0.25in"><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Hmm, even stranger. When I try to set the password and at the same time told it not to use NAT it actually does not take the password. Weird. It restarts the router, but I can still log in with the default blank password. <o></o></SPAN></FONT></P>
<OL style="MARGIN-TOP: 0in" type=1 start=2>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1"><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">The wireless network is on by default, with no security, and that handy blank password on the router. 'Nuf said. From what I saw in my testing anyone could connect to it and manage it as long as they were on the internal side of the network, but of course, all that takes is a pringles can and a convenient spot to park within about five miles of the router. I have said many times that one of these days I am just going to turn off my wireless network and use one of my neighbors. On any given day I can see at least 6 of them from my home office. I just think there is a company policy against that sort of thing.</SPAN></FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1"><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">The use terms like <EM>?computer hackers use what is known as ?pinging? to find potential victims on the Internet.?</EM> A hacker is not a criminal! Why is it that we keep using the term "hacker" when we really should be using "attacker" or "criminal"? Hacker is a proud term that was originally used in the computer world to refer to those who really loved computers and everything about them. Then some misguided journalist decided to equate it to criminal and it went downhill from there. Why can't we just refer to them as the criminals they are? If someone goes in and robs a bank branch there would be no question about which labels to put on him, but because the crime involved stealing someone's bank account details and electronically transfer all the money to some place you've never heard of they are somehow different than traditional robbers? I've even seen cases where prosecution was called off for fear of destroying the criminal's "career and chances of getting into the university of his choice." This is just appalling. Maybe if we used more descriptive terms to refer to these people we'd start actually putting them where they belong.</SPAN></FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1"><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Oh, but the fact that criminals use ping as a way to discover your system is not sufficient reason to block ICMP echo by default. You have to actually turn that blocking on. I wonder if the router blocks portscanning? They use that too. I suppose I need to find out.</SPAN></FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1"><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><EM>?Your Router is equipped with a firewall that will protect your network from a wide array of common hacker attacks including Ping of Death (PoD)?<BR></EM>Wow!!! It protects me against a really scary sounding attack!!! I guess I don?t need that patch Microsoft issued 8 YEARS AGO to fix that problem. BTW, exactly how many people are still running NT 4.0 on their home wireless network so they would be vulnerable to this? I guess the original release of Windows 95 was vulnerable too, but putting a firewall in front of those is not likely to help much.</SPAN></FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1"><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">IP Address Lease Time: Forever. Yeah, that makes sense, because we will never ever change computers!<o></o></SPAN></FONT>
<LI class=MsoNormal style="mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1"><FONT face=Arial><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">The driver for the network cards that go along with the router is not signed. Not to worry, the manual explains it:<BR><FONT face=Verdana color=#003366 size=1><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 8.5pt; COLOR: #003366; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">You might see a screen shot similar to this one <screenshot of unsigned driver approval screen here>. This DOES NOT mean there is a problem. Our drivers have been fully tested and are compatible with this operating system.</SPAN><BR></FONT>Good idea!!! Let?s train people to click ?yes I want to install the malicious software? (or the equivalent) in every dialog that pops up and asks them to do so. Why is it so hard to understand that driver signing is about trust in the source of the driver, not about whether it has been tested to work or not. I don't think anyone expects a vendor to release a driver they have tested only insofar as to make sure it compiles.</SPAN></FONT></LI></OL>
<P class=MsoNormal style="mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1"><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">People complain about Microsoft security, but frankly, the state of security in the rest of the industry scares me sometimes.</SPAN></FONT></P><img src="http://blogs.technet.com/aggbug.aspx?PostID=410558" width="1" height="1"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://blogs.technet.com/jesper_johansson/archive/2005/09/09/410558.aspx">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Curious about SMB message signing?

by Jesper Johansson In reply to Jesper's TechRepublic Blo ...

<P><FONT face=Arial size=2>Or just want to know how to shoot yourself in the foot? <img src="http://www.protectyourwindowsnetwork.com/images/smiley.gif"></FONT></P>
<P><FONT face=Arial><FONT size=2>SMB Message Signing is one of Microsoft's top support call generators, and for good reason. It mitigates valid security threats, but is very complicated to use and can have far-reaching implications on the stability and functionality of your network. To help people figure out how to use it properly I made it the topic of the September Security Management column: <SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><A title=http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/columns/secmgmt/sm0905.mspx href="http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/columns/secmgmt/sm0905.mspx">http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/columns/secmgmt/sm0905.mspx</A>.</SPAN></FONT></FONT></P>
<P><FONT face=Arial><FONT size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">I titled the column "How To Shoot Yourself in the Foot With Security, part 1." I have no idea how many parts there will be but as anyone who has been in the field for a while knows, there are many ways to shoot yourself in the foot with security! If you have a favorite story in particular or something you'd like me to discuss, let me know, or start comment thread here.</SPAN></FONT></FONT></P>
<P><FONT face=Arial><FONT size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Enjoy!</SPAN></FONT></FONT></P><img src="http://blogs.technet.com/aggbug.aspx?PostID=410903" width="1" height="1"><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://blogs.technet.com/jesper_johansson/archive/2005/09/15/410903.aspx">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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