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Why can't Linux come up with a way to install easily?

by Rabbit_Runner In reply to Join the Linux discussion

Why can't Linux come up with a way to install easily?

I am fairly new to Linux. I have installed it a number of times and played with Solaris 8. But would not call me a Linux expert by any method.

My question is why (all flavors of Linux) do the different packages not come complete? If I download a particular package that I want to use, invariably it requires another package that I do not have. Then I search the net to find that and install it. Only to find out that there a couple of other things that need to be installed first. There have been some attempt to work around this, but not much. If the Linux community would get together and have the software programmers finish their software packages, then Linux as a desktop OS will take off and give MS a run for their money. If I wanted an application, or utility, the installation files would be 'complete'. Instructons would be given, and when the installation was complete, everything would work.

I have to give MS and the windows Apps writers, a good 'thumbs up' because when you get a program, app or utility and install it, by and large, it is complete and will run as expected.

There are some great Linux apps out there and it could give MS a good run for it money. The common user would be likely to purchase a flavor of Linux if it were easy to install, is less expensive than Windows, the programs would install easily, the OS would integrate with Windows networking easily, and the applications could have documents that could import into windows apps or have windows documents by opened by the Linux app.

Come on, lets get our act together and get a good desktop OS which the public would be interested in using.

Just my two cents worth.

Michael R.

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Some vendors are trying to get there

by masinick In reply to Why can't Linux come up w ...

What you've described is, in fact, one of the most common impediments to the wide adoption of Linux software, particularly on desktop systems. There are actually several vendors who are at least attempting to deal with the issues that you describe.

One vendor, Lycoris, has a really easy to use desktop system. It doesn't have 10,000 applications, it has a modest set of applications, all of which work seamlessly together. Lycoris sells preconfigured desktop and tablet PC systems.

Xandros is another vendor that's focused on making stable desktop software that interoperates well with Windows software and peacefully coexists on the same system.

LindowsOS is a consumer grade system produced by mp3 founder, Michael Robertson at Lindows.com. Lindows.com sells quite a few preconfigured systems that have the basic software ready to go.

Other vendors are getting into this space. There is plenty of room for improvement, but it's getting better all the time. I have a Dell Dimension 4100 system and I can easily install at least a dozen Linux systems and have them ready to use in 15-30 minutes.

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In the real world - nothing is free

by cou-cou In reply to Some vendors are trying t ...

Many have dreamed Linux to be the next killer software and maybe to replace the giant MS. But in the real world - nothing is free. Even it starts out with a free offer, which in this case in Linux, it will end up just like another MS or vendor fee-based software.
So for me, I do not expect Linux will be a big star eventually.

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Free is not always better

by bobweed In reply to In the real world - nothi ...

As far as the general public is concerned, free
doesn't mean better in software...It usually means
that it is a beta or test distribution and the full
version will cost $$. But, they do expect that for
their money, basic utility is offered in the
distro...some linux distros do not even come with
the ability to run programs that all users (publc)
need....things like staroffice and Instant
Messengers (that are useable with msn and aol).

Most people would pay for the distros that offer
the useability they require....One of my
computers is loaded with lindows 4.5 and on
has Mandrake 9.1 while two of the others have
various versions of windows on them...the one
that gets used the most is the windows XP
version because people feel comfortable with
it...the next is the lindows because it is the
closest to the windows for the users.....also
much better at the internet than the windows.

So the cost thing is not the real issue....the real
issue is why the various versions of linux can't
seem to agree on how to implement the included
software.....I wind up spending a lot of my time
installing software because people do not know
how to use the rpm function

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I've tried several

by gsmith In reply to Free is not always bette ...

I've tried several - Suse, Red Hat, Mandrake and Turbo. Each has it's unique quirks, usually regarding hardware drivers. On my Dell, Turbo was by FAR the easiest to install (all I had to do was supply a proxy IP number before surfing the Web) but it lacks "extras" like Open Office. I look at it as a learning experience and try to have fun.

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"easy" installation distros

by apotheon In reply to Some vendors are trying t ...

What you're referring to in your examples are actually distributions of Linux that are geared toward the "user friendly" GUI installations that default the kitchen sink into the install. There's a difference between that and easy software installation.

The major problems that people complain about typically have very little to do with Windows being "easier" to work with in and of itself, and have much to do with users not being used to a different philosophy of computing. Something that must be realized is that to make full use of the power and flexibility of a good Linux distro you must overcome your fear of the command line.

There are distros that make it incredibly easy to install and remove software, including dependencies, using the GUI environment; SuSE and Fedora/RedHat are a couple of these. More useful and easier to work with, in my experience, is a system with an extremely well-developed command line system for package management, like Debian.

RedHat-related distros approach Debian in ease of package management, through use of YUM for instance, but for me nothing approaches the ease of use of Debian's apt system. The apt package manager in Debian does use the command line, and does require a user to learn a couple of shell commands to make it work, but it is actually much easier to master and make effective use of apt to install and remove software (including all dependencies) than it is to perform similar tasks in Windows. For one thing, you don't have to order or go to a store to purchase OpenOffice, whereas you do have to do so with MS Office.

For the record:
Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora both also use apt, though their package archives for apt are not as extensive as those for Debian. Also, Lindows has changed its name (some time ago) to Linspire due to lawsuit issues with Microsoft.

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15 -20 minutes?

by laredoflash In reply to Some vendors are trying t ...

Yeeaaah riigght! I have found SuSE Linux from Novel to the the easiest to install. Simply install the 1st cd and boot. No problems for the most part. SuSE takes care of all the stuff. You just say yes. It works great and is solid. 10.1 is cool sadly they removed some of the wireless drivers and now my usb network adapter does not work...guess I'll go back to 10.0.

Rod

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Some vendors are trying to get there

by masinick In reply to Why can't Linux come up w ...

What you've described is, in fact, one of the most common impediments to the wide adoption of Linux software, particularly on desktop systems. There are actually several vendors who are at least attempting to deal with the issues that you describe.

One vendor, Lycoris, has a really easy to use desktop system. It doesn't have 10,000 applications, it has a modest set of applications, all of which work seamlessly together. Lycoris sells preconfigured desktop and tablet PC systems.

Xandros is another vendor that's focused on making stable desktop software that interoperates well with Windows software and peacefully coexists on the same system.

LindowsOS is a consumer grade system produced by mp3 founder, Michael Robertson at Lindows.com. Lindows.com sells quite a few preconfigured systems that have the basic software ready to go.

Other vendors are getting into this space. There is plenty of room for improvement, but it's getting better all the time. I have a Dell Dimension 4100 system and I can easily install at least a dozen Linux systems and have them ready to use in 15-30 minutes.

Collapse -

Some vendors are trying to get there

by masinick In reply to Why can't Linux come up w ...

What you've described is, in fact, one of the most common impediments to the wide adoption of Linux software, particularly on desktop systems. There are actually several vendors who are at least attempting to deal with the issues that you describe.

One vendor, Lycoris, has a really easy to use desktop system. It doesn't have 10,000 applications, it has a modest set of applications, all of which work seamlessly together. Lycoris sells preconfigured desktop and tablet PC systems.

Xandros is another vendor that's focused on making stable desktop software that interoperates well with Windows software and peacefully coexists on the same system.

LindowsOS is a consumer grade system produced by mp3 founder, Michael Robertson at Lindows.com. Lindows.com sells quite a few preconfigured systems that have the basic software ready to go.

Other vendors are getting into this space. There is plenty of room for improvement, but it's getting better all the time. I have a Dell Dimension 4100 system and I can easily install at least a dozen Linux systems and have them ready to use in 15-30 minutes.

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I'm an avid user of linux

by LordInfidel In reply to Why can't Linux come up w ...

But, I can honestly say, that it will not be able to compete with MS as a desktop, consumer grade OS.

The closest thing that it will get is MAC's OS X.

I say this will complete love for linux. But it is not a platform for the joe **** end user.

Making linux to be just another desktop OS takes it's power away from it. Every distro that I have used that runs X on it, is very bloated and slow.

I only run X when I have to. Other then that, I use it for what is best used for.

As far as installations go, RedHat handsdown has the easiest install process.

It's a double-edged sword, linux on the user desktop. Because the reason why MS has succeeded is because it has dumbed down everything to the end user. Linux is not a dumbed down OS. Nor should it be.

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