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To win the space race, we need another

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<p><a href="http://66.249.93.104/search?q=cache:ppLWUmOXDOEJ:www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/editorial/outlook/3326979+%22To+win+the+space+race,+we+need+another+%22&hl=en">http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/editorial/outlook/3326979</a></p>
Sorry, but you'll have to forget about Scotty.<br />
<br />
He was downsized years ago, and his job was outsourced to Klingons.
Currently, he's happily shoveling manure on horse farm on Aldebaran,
and he's not coming back. His kids are studying law, investment
banking, and burger flipping.<br />
<br />
CEO of the Weyland-Yutani corporation, who owns the contracting firm QRC,
that operates starship Enterprise got a $23 vigintillion bonus after
laying off 17% of Enterprise crew, including all of her's original
officers. As a result, Enterprise became a <a href="http://www.badmovies.org/movies/darkstar/">Darkstar-like accident waiting to happen</a>, bound to disaster, and huge insurance premium for Weyland-Yutani corp.<br />
<br />

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Positive proof, that IT is REALLY in the toilet.

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

This is the most pukeable buzzword soup I've came across in years. Be
sure to pinch shut your mental nose before you read it!<br /><br />
<a href="http://www.dmreview.com/article_sub.cfm?articleId=1038111">http://www.dmreview.com/article_sub.cfm?articleId=1038111</a><br />
<br />
<table border="1"><tbody><tr><td>The future of IT is bright. The disciplined IT skill set - precision
programming, estimating specifications-based scope of work,
specifications-driven design of deliverables, project management skills
to integrate resources, testing methodology, logging progress and error
classification - are valuable and transferable as long as they are up
to date. If you have tripped and fallen, rise and climb again. If you
are flying high, soar!
</td></tr></tbody></table>
<br />
On the contrary. It's time to grab a parachute & bail out.<br />
<br />

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How lame can they get?

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/technology/article/0,1299,DRMN_49_4127320,00.html">http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/technology/article/0,1299,DRMN_49_4127320,00.html</a><br />
<br />
<table border="1"><tbody><tr><td>And what do the ads look like?

<p>In a 30-second spot, Cate Lawrence, CEO of Boulder-based software maker Warrior Solutions Inc., makes a bullish point: <i>There are more jobs than ever . . . </i>

</p><p>Cut to a new voice and a new face.

</p><p><i>. . . for high-tech people - technicians, engineers, scientists,</i> adds Thomas Marsh, executive vice president of Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Jefferson County.

</p><p>A printed message soon appears: <strong>"Parents, help your kids go further with science and math."</strong>
</p>
</td></tr></tbody></table>
That's typical soviet-style slogan.<br />
<br />
And that's how the ad's Soviet equivalent looks like:<br />
<br />
<img alt="Be a metal worker" src="http://eng.plakaty.ru/i/plakats/medium/1975.jpg" /><br />
<br />
Translation:<br />
<br />
[top] <em>BE A METAL WORKER!</em><br />
[bottom] <em>LADS ANS LASSES!</em><br /><em>
Let's </em><em>help the Soviet state</em><em> create a powerful manpower resource reserves</em>.<br /><em>
ENROLL</em><br />
[illegible]<br />
<br />
<a href="http://eng.plakaty.ru/posters?cid=4&full=1&page=6&id=1975">http://eng.plakaty.ru/posters?cid=4&full=1&page=6&id=1975</a><br />
<br />

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Debunking the Myth of a Desperate Software Labor Shortage

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://heather.cs.ucdavis.edu/itaa.real.html#tth_sEc2.1">http://heather.cs.ucdavis.edu/itaa.real.html#tth_sEc2.1</a><br />
<br />
<h3></h3>
<h3>. . .</h3>
<h3><a name="tth_sEc2.1">
2.1</a>  Industry: Desires for Cheap Labor and ``Indentured
Servitude''</h3>


<p>
In early 1997, the ITAA industry lobbying group began its massive
national public relations campaign to develop an image of a software
labor shortage in the public consciousness. Many critics speculated at
the time that access to cheap labor, in the form of foreign nationals,
was the ``hidden agenda'' behind the ITAA's campaign. Though ITAA's
Harris Miller originally denied this
(<i>Electronic Engineering Times</i>, December 8, 1997), another ITAA
official blurted out around the same time that its ``number one
priority'' in 1998 would be to push Congress to increase the yearly
quota of H-1B work visas (<i>San Jose Mercury News</i>, November 21,
1997), which turned out to be the case; ITAA led the successful
campaigns to raise the H-1B cap in 1998 and 2000.

</p>
<p>
Amazingly, the prominent computer-industry business magazine, the <i>
Red Herring</i>, admitted in its July 1998 editorial that the charges I
make in this report are correct, and even more amazingly, actually
endorsed the idea of hiring H-1Bs as a means to accessing cheap labor.
The <i>Red Herring</i> put it this way:

</p>

<blockquote>The congressional General Accounting Office found ``serious analytical
and methodological weaknesses'' in the [ITAA/Dept. of Commerce]
reports. The American Engineering Association criticized common IT
hiring practices that eliminate more than 95 percent of applicants. A
University of California at Davis professor decried ``rampant'' age
discrimination by the industry and suggested that technology companies
prefer to hire young, cheap, foreign programmers who are willing to work
80-hour weeks.

<p>
Though factually correct, these criticisms are, we feel, ingenuous.
Companies have a fiduciary responsibility to keep labor costs low. If
U.S. technology companies cannot find highly trained, highly motivated
American employees at a competitive cost, then a shortage does exist.
And if companies say they want to hire more skilled foreign workers
because those workers are cheaper, we should believe them - and increase
the number of visas issued.

</p></blockquote>
Equally important as cheap labor as an attraction to industry is the
<i>de facto</i> ``indentured servitude'' of the H-1B workers whose
employers are sponsoring them for greencards. As explained in Section
<a href="http://heather.cs.ucdavis.edu/itaa.real.html#trappedsection">9.4</a>, such workers are essentially
immobile for a period of five years or more. This means a programmer
cannot suddenly leave the employer in the lurch on an important project
by leaving for another company, an extremely important consideration to
employers. It also enables the employers to give them smaller raises,
work them more hours and so on.<br />
<br />
. . .<br />

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Gates to students: We need your ideas

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://www.computerworld.com/careertopics/careers/story/0,10801,105481,00.html?from=story%5Fkc">http://www.computerworld.com/careertopics/careers/story/0,10801,105481,00.html?from=story%5Fkc</a><br />
<br />
Yea. We need your ideas, and to **** with the rest of you<br />
<br />

<a href="http://www.computerworld.com/careertopics/careers/story/0,10801,105516,00.html?from=story%5Fkc">http://www.computerworld.com/careertopics/careers/story/0,10801,105516,00.html?from=story%5Fkc</a><br />
<br />

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Gates serves as surprise teacher

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://badgerherald.com/news/2005/10/13/gates_serves_as_surp.php">http://badgerherald.com/news/2005/10/13/gates_serves_as_surp.php</a><br />
<br />
<table border="1"><tbody><tr><td>
Despite numerous video cameras and unidentified ?guests?
? including an undercover police officer with a bomb-sniffing dog
in tow ? all under the facade of an ?educational video
shoot,? the unsuspecting students were star struck after a knock
at the door revealed the Microsoft Corporation chairman and chief
software architect as their teacher for the remainder of the period.<br />
</td></tr></tbody></table><br />
Looks like this is the only way Gates could induce students to
listen to his pitch. I wander, if there were armed guards at the door,
preventing students from running hither and thither.<br />
<br />

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Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?

by jkameleon In reply to Just another blog

<a href="http://www.desktoppipeline.com/172302308">http://www.desktoppipeline.com/172302308</a><br />
<br />
Corresponding poll says the following<br />
<br />
<table id="Table1" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1">
<tbody><tr>
<td>
<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
<tbody><tr><td class="default"><b>


<b>Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?</b></b>
<br />
In <a href="http://www.desktoppipeline.com/172302308">Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?</a> I write that there seems to be a disconnect between claims of rising numbers of IT jobs and articles like <a href="http://www.desktoppipeline.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=172301443">Is IT Still Worth It?</a>. What do you think?</td></tr>


<tr>
<td class="default">


<br />
IT departments still offer good jobs with bright futures.

</td>

</tr>
<tr>

<td class="default"><img src="http://img.cmpnet.com/shared/apps/quickPolls/graph_1.gif" border="0" height="10" width="11" /> <b>11%</b>


</td></tr>


<tr>
<td class="default">


I'm happy with my IT job, but things have changed around me.

</td>

</tr>
<tr>

<td class="default"><img src="http://img.cmpnet.com/shared/apps/quickPolls/graph_2.gif" border="0" height="10" width="31" /> <b>31%</b>


</td></tr>


<tr>
<td class="default">


I wouldn't recommend a career in IT to my son or daughter.

</td>

</tr>
<tr>

<td class="default"><img src="http://img.cmpnet.com/shared/apps/quickPolls/graph_3.gif" border="0" height="10" width="45" /> <b>45%</b>


</td></tr>


<tr>
<td class="default">


In my company the IT department is a rapidly sinking ship.

</td>

</tr>
<tr>

<td class="default"><img src="http://img.cmpnet.com/shared/apps/quickPolls/graph_4.gif" border="0" height="10" width="13" /> <b>13%</b>


</td></tr>




<tr>
<td>




<br />
</td></tr></tbody>
</table> </td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>

Note: Poll is still going on at the moment, and percentages may vary.<br />

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Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?

by Michael Professional In reply to Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?

IT seems to have gotten away from meeting business needs (if it ever was focused there) and more or again into the technology versus other things.  Also, as more and more folks are knowledgable (our kids, etc.) the "mystic" of IT has faded.  Matching IT with business savy should keep you attuned to the future directions.  Hope this helps.

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Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?

by jason_whiteaker In reply to Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?

<p>Here we go again...IT needs to "align itself with business"...blah-blah-blah...</p>
<p>Talk about a worn-out phrase. I would like to ask those people who make this statement time and again, "Why is it that the more managerial among IT staffers think that all of us techies WANT to be managers?" I'm so sick and tired of the attitude that technical work is a dead-end street, that geeks are losers, and that the real action is in management. Frankly, not everyone wants to be a manager, pursue an MBA, or be the CxO de jour.</p>
<p>I admit that being a pure techie can limit an IT career to a point, however, not every technical position can and will be outsourced. The IT pundits purvey ad-nauseum that techies/geeks better become business savvy, or else become extinct. Experience and history has demonstrated that technical people who innovate, adapt, and provide useful and competent customer service are every bit as needed as management. I've worked in about half a dozen industries, public and private, in my career of 13+ years. I have yet to find myself going toe-to-toe with a bunch of suits where my business acumen would even matter. IT is a tool, and we IT folk should be able to recognize where our craft can make a difference in the company's pain points. To suggest, though, IT workers should concern themselves more with budgets, marketing, process alignment, or some other business buzzword as opposed to what IT does best (technology) is an inefficient fit. With business operations being so complex, why should I think that with a limited business view (when compared to the folks who actually run and make decisions for the company), IT's suave business "moves" are going to turn a company on its ear? C'mon! As old-school as it sounds, companies are led from the top down - leadership and the trust placed in staff by those leaders are what sets the tone of and future for the company. I could have a well-managed company with a mediocre IT group, and I would bet that the company will probably still do well despite that group. Conversely, a company with bad leadership and the perfect, uber-IT-process-aligned-business-savvy-project-management-customer-service-oriented superheros will still go bust at the end of the day. I submit that IT should relegate itself to being attune to the pain points of the company and where it can assist. Additionally, management has to be competent and recognize what IT can bring to the table. An IT department that tries to move outside of its core competency by being a pseudo-business operations department is not securing its future. If management can't recognize that IT has a place in its planning and operations, than it doesn't really matter what IT thinks or does. Oh, and by the way, since when was ANY job secure?</p>
<p>Quit trying to ram the management track down my (and many of my colleagues) throats! If management has got it so together, is so happening, and so "with it", then why is it that so many companies have failed due to corrupt management? Comparatively, how many companies have been taken down by corrupt IT techy worker bees? </p>
<p>I'm not suggesting that management is a poor career choice. I'm merely stating that there are those of us who are willing to sacrifice the glitz, politics, and money that a management track offers. And you know what? I still have friends, a personality and rapport with my non-techy customers, and receive an occasional "Thanks!" from those customers.</p>

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Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?

by keith2468a In reply to Are IT Jobs Good Jobs?

There are some great jobs in IT ... in certain parts of the world ... but you can say that about almost any trade or profession.<br />
<br />
And people who really really want to work with computers, and who don't
mind moving across the country, should go into IT no matter how bad the
odds are for the general population.<br />
<br /><strong>
Otherwise IT isn't worth it.  </strong><br />
<br />
IT has gone from being a profession to being a trade.  And there
are many trades (not all trades) where you can make more money, with
less formal preparation, have less on-going worry about going
out-of-date, and more stability in what part of the country you work
in.  <br />
<br />
The large segment of the population called "baby boomers" are retiring
over the next 25 years.  Their retirement will mean rapid
advancement for those entering the trades and professions they
dominate.  Because IT is a new field, baby boomers are in a small
minority within it.  Going into IT means forgoing the rapid
advancement the boomer retirement is offering others.<br />
<br />
Then there is the poor opportunity for career advancement into the
ranks of middle managers and executives.  Managers and executives
in IT tend to come from the ranks of salespeople, accountants, and
business people.  CIOs and managers of large departments generally
did not come up through the ranks of programmers and technicians.<br />
<br />
In part our profession has itself to blame for this.  Collectively
we have consistently adopted practices that shun responsibility in the
decision making process.  And collectively we have accepted
working in unprofessional circumstances for supervisors who are
unqualified to lead us.  And finally, we never learned to properly
value our work (so many of us work for free, which violates the
definition of professional), and so others do not value our work.<br />
<br /><strong>
So my advice to prospective IT students:  </strong><br />
<br />
1.  If you want a good income and stability, consider
plumbing, carpentry, aircraft maintenance, and police work.  <br />
<br />
2.  If you want to be a true IT professional, that means taking a
degree in engineering, accounting, or project management, and then
directing your career into IT through your choice of optional courses,
your jobs, and continuing education.  If you want to be an IT
executive go into sales.<br />
<br />
3.  Be prepared to leave the field at age 35 to 40 to take up
driving a city bus.  The professions that manage our trade like
cheap inexpensive new graduates.  They generally don't appreciate
and won't pay for experience.  When the time comes, it does not
matter how much continuous education you have taken or how versatile
you are.  <strong>Do not expect that to change.</strong><br />
<br />
If you are working in IT, ask your current boss and future prospective
employers what their educational and career background is.  Also
find out about their peers.  If all the managers above you and
your fellow IT flunkies are people from dis-similar backgrounds, if
they are all MBAs, salesmen, or from "some other socio-economic group"
do not expect that you will ever be joining their ranks.<strong><br />
</strong>

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