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Laptop resistance

By lachance ·
We are migrating faculty from desktops to laptops for a variety of business reasons. We are meeting with a great deal of resistance. Here's a sample issue that I am wondering if anyone out there has seen or addressed:

I am having no luck trying to type on my laptop without pain in my wrists. If I do decide to take on the laptop, I will need a "broken" keyboard, much like the Microsoft Natural Keyboard. That exact one is not necessary, I know it is expensive. I also need a wheelmouse of some type.

Why this person feels they need these things is somewhat beyond me, but perhaps you have some suggestions as to how to make this transition more palatable to our users.

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Laptop resistance

by Russ Werner In reply to Laptop resistance

If a corporate descision has been made to convert to laptops, no mater what the reason, it is not the employees position to argue the point. As an IT administrator it is your position to politely but firmly explain the transition. Do not choose wording which allows the end user to think there is room for argument.
The world is filled with cry babys, whether you were moving from desktops to laptops or laptops to desktops, you would probably have the same number of complaints.
Explain the transition and forget about the complaints, your position it to assist in any OS and programming problems, not the complaints of the cry babys.

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by lachance In reply to Laptop resistance

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by MtnSqs In reply to Laptop resistance

Whilst I partially agree with the previous answer when it comes to people who object ot change for changes sake, you must also remember that laptops have smaller keyboards with cluttered layouts.

If the person is to be using the PC seerious typing or many hours a day, then a full size keyboard adn mouse may be essentail to ease of use, and preventing RSI type claims. If an individual thinks this will be a problem for them, then they (not you) shoudl be taking it up with your compnay's healthand safety officer.

You, as a responsible IT Admin, should ensure that management is aware that some staff members may need extra keybords and mice, and shoudl have raised this issues with senior management during the process of making hte decision to go to laptops.

It sounds a bit to me like management has not thought this through, and wants laptops so that the staff can take thier work home (and presumably do unpaid overtime)

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by lachance In reply to Laptop resistance

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by wtbooth In reply to Laptop resistance

Every successful laptop deployment I either been a part of or seen succeed has taken into consideration the end-users need for a full-size keyboard and standard mouse. And most include an extra monitor and many have included dock stations/port-replicators to allow quick disconnects. While some people are perfectly happy with the mouse and keyboard built into the laptop, most will not be - especially in an environment that resists change like a school/university.

According to OSHA guidelines, these end-users have a valid concern. The angle of the laptop screen is completely outside of the recommendations they publish as well as the angle of the keyboard and location of the mouse.

Considering you already have desktops you are replacing, my suggestion would be to let them keep the keyboard and mouse they already have (maybe even the monitor).

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by lachance In reply to Laptop resistance

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by lachance In reply to Laptop resistance

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