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Launching Word w/ a particular template

By JodyGilbert ·
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By default, launching Word opens a new document based on the Normal.dot template. How do you set Word to launch with a new document based on a template you'd prefer to use instead?

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by D_V Ant In reply to Launching Word w/ a parti ...

Create a new shortcut for Word.
In the Target box enter the path to Word; this path is usually C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\Winword.exe.
At the end of the path, type the startup switch /t"templatename" sans quotes. Be sure to include the full path for the template.
Give your shortcut a distinctive name that will let you know what template is being used. You can create multiple shortcuts for different templates.

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by JodyGilbert In reply to

All good answers; gotta go with this one. First in, most versatile approach. Thanks!

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by sgt_shultz In reply to Launching Word w/ a parti ...

i believe you did not mention the version of Word.
one way to do this is found in the article below, taken from the microsoft knowledgebase found at support.microsoft.com
Microsoft Knowledge Base Article - 210565

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W Word Startup (Command-Line) Switches and Their Purpose
View products that this article applies to.
This article was previously published under Q210565
SUMMARY
This article describes the command-line switches that can be used to start Word and their purpose. Some of these switches are also described in Word Help.

For more information about startup switches, click Microsoft Word Help on the Help menu, type control what happens when you start word in the Office Assistant or the Answer Wizard, and then click Search to view the topics returned.

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by sgt_shultz In reply to

MORE INFORMATION
To use a command-line switch to start Word, use one of the following methods.
Method 1: Use the Run Command
Click Start, and then click Run.
Click Browse.
Locate the Office folder, click the Winword.exe file, and then click Open. The Winword.exe file is located in the following folder by default:
C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office

Note The path to Winword.exe is enclosed in quotation marks.
Click in the Open box, and then reposition the insertion point outside of (to the right of) the closing quotation mark at the end of the path statement.
Type a space, followed by the switch that you want to use.

For example, if you want to start Word and prevent the loading of add-ins and global templates, type the following in the Open box, including the quotation marks:
"C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\Winword.exe" /a

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by sgt_shultz In reply to

Method 2: Use a Shortcut
Follow these steps to create a shortcut to start Word from the Windows desktop:
Right-click the Windows desktop, point to New on the shortcut menu that appears, and then click Shortcut.
In the Create Shortcut dialog box, click Browse.
In the Browse dialog box, change the Look in box to the following folder:
C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office

Note This location of this folder may be different on your system.
Click the Winword.exe file, and then click Open.
Click in the Command line box, and then position the insertion point at the end of the path that is listed. The path that is listed in the Command line box should look similar to the following:
"C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\Winword.exe"

After the closing quotation mark, type a space and then type the switch that you want. The path that is listed in the Command line box should now look similar to the following:
"C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\Winword.exe" /a

In the Create Shortcut dialog box, click Next.
In the Select a name for the shortcut box, type the name of your new shortcut, and then click Finish.
Method Notes
If you put the switch inside the closing quotation mark and then click OK, you receive one of the following error messages:

Cannot find the file 'C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\Winword.exe /a' (or one of its components). Make sure the path and filename are correct and that all required libraries are available.
-or-

Windows cannot find 'D:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office10\WINWORD.EXE /a'. Make sure you typed the name correctly, and then try again. To search for a file, click the Start button, and then click Search.

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by sgt_shultz In reply to

If you specify a path or file name that contains spaces after a switch, enclose the path in quotation marks. For example, if you want to start Word and automatically create a document based on the Contemporary Fax template, the switch should look similar to the following:
/t"c:\program files\microsoft office\templates\1033\contemporary fax.dot"

Therefore, the complete startup command would be similar to the following:
"C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\Winword.exe" /t"c:\program files\microsoft office\templates\1033\contemporary fax.dot"

This is also true for the /l switch.
List of Word Startup Switches
The following Word startup (command-line) switches are listed in Word Help.

Type To do this
/a Starts Word and prevents add-ins and global templates (including the Normal template) from being loaded automatically.

The /a switch also locks the setting files; that is, the setting files cannot be read or modified if you use this switch.
/laddinpath Starts Word and then loads a specific Word add-in.
/m Starts a new instance of Word without running any AutoExec macros.
/mmacroname Starts Word and then runs a specific macro. The /m switch also prevents Word from running any AutoExec macros.
/n Starts a new instance of Word with no document open. Documents opened in each instance of Word will not appear as choices in the Window menu of other instances.

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by sgt_shultz In reply to

/ttemplatename Starts Word with a new document based on a template other than the Normal template.
/w Starts a new instance of Word with a blank document. Documents opened in each instance of Word will not appear as choices in the Window menu of the other instances.
(no switch) A new Word window is opened with a blank document using the existing instance of the Word program.

The following Word startup (command-line) switches are not listed in Word Help.

Type To do this
/c Starts a new instance of Word and then invokes NetMeeting.
/q Starts Word without displaying the Word splash screen. This switch is only available in Word 2000 Service Release 1 (SR-1).
/r Starts Word in the background, makes changes in the Windows registry, and then quits. This switch forces a re-register of Word in the Windows registry.
/u Has no effect and does not start Word.
/x Starts a new instance of Word from the operating shell (for example, to print in Word). This instance of Word responds to only one DDE request and ignores all other DDE requests and multi-instances. If you are starting a new instance of Word in the operating environment (for example, in Windows), it is recommended that you use the /w switch, which starts a fully functioning instance.
pathname\filename Starts Starts Word with a specific document open.
Note To open multiple files at once, use pathname\filename.

Example: "C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\Winword.exe" c:\filename1.doc c:\filename2.doc
(any other switch) Starts a new instance of Word. For example, if you start Word with just the / and no switch, or with any unlisted switch combination, Word just starts a new instance of Word with a new blank document.

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by sgt_shultz In reply to

The following Word startup (command-line) switch is listed in Word 2000 Help but not listed in Word 2002 or Word 2003 Help.
Type To do this
/mfilen Starts Word and then opens the specified file on the Most Recently Used (MRU) list on the File menu.

The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Office Word 2003
Microsoft Word 2002
Microsoft Word 2000

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by sgt_shultz In reply to

readers digest version:
(let's say the new template you want to use is called 'templatenew.dot' and it lives where it is supposed to so all users will see it as a choice in Word/File New.)
<snip>
Method 2: Use a Shortcut
Follow these steps to create a shortcut to start Word from the Windows desktop:
Right-click the Windows desktop, point to New on the shortcut menu that appears, and then click Shortcut.
In the Create Shortcut dialog box, click Browse.
In the Browse dialog box, change the Look in box to the following folder:
C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office

Note This location of this folder may be different on your system.
Click the Winword.exe file, and then click Open.
Click in the Command line box, and then position the insertion point at the end of the path that is listed. The path that is listed in the Command line box should look similar to the following:
"C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\Winword.exe"

After the closing quotation mark, type a space and then type the switch that you want. The path that is listed in the Command line box should now look similar to the following:
"C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\Winword.exe" /ttemplatenew.dot

In the Create Shortcut dialog box, click Next.
In the Select a name for the shortcut box, type the name of your new shortcut, and then click Finish.

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by Bristar In reply to Launching Word w/ a parti ...

Is it too obvious to simply overwrite the Normal.Dot with the template you would prefer to use? K.I.S.S.?

You can backup the normal.dot by renaming it if you prefer.

Remember that for in Word (or anywhere in Office), there are usually at least three ways to do anything. Shoot for the simplest path if you intend to make computers work for you, not you work them.

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