General discussion

Locked

Linux Backup and Restore

By sendbote ·
what's about the directories /dev and /proc in backup.
which are necessary in backup and in the case of a disaster recovery ?

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

5 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  
| Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

Linux Backup and Restore

by cpfeiffe In reply to Linux Backup and Restore

/proc maintains process list information. In the event of a disaster where you will most likely boot the server fresh and then apply a tape restore or rebuild the OS and apply a tape restore this is unnecessary.

/dev is a listing of device links for all of your hardware. This can be rebuilt during bootup, but there are some cautions here. Everything isn't always rebuilt in the same order and some of the /dev links to a device will change. If you want to completely rebuild your kernel and apply a tape restore for data recovery only this is once again not necessary. However, it might be good to capture this information in case you accidentally remove a dev link or something like that. Your kernel and file system structures are expecting dev links to be specific. You don't have to worry about quieting this directory to back it up since it is only links. You just want to be able to know what links to what later if you need to.

Good luck.

Collapse -

Linux Backup and Restore

by sendbote In reply to Linux Backup and Restore

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Linux Backup and Restore

by jcmcintyre In reply to Linux Backup and Restore

The /proc filesystem is best described as a snapshot of the kernel. It's primary is to make system and process information available to user-run processes. These files and directories aren't actually stored on your hard drive. The data you see in the /proc file system is actually created dynamically in msmory when you read any of the files.

There are some commands which create entries in the /proc filesystem, such as when IP forwarding is enabled in the kernel from the command line. With theexceptions fo commands like these, never make any changes to the /rpoc file system

Cheers

Jim

Collapse -

Linux Backup and Restore

by sendbote In reply to Linux Backup and Restore

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Linux Backup and Restore

by sendbote In reply to Linux Backup and Restore

This question was auto closed due to inactivity

Back to Linux Forum
5 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  

Related Forums