General discussion

Locked

Linux for a newbie

By jodyc ·
There are so many releases where do you start?

My background is of course with Windows products. I know DOS very well. Novell Lan manager etc. of course Windows NT/2000.

I'm thinking I would like two versions one that I could load on a old 486 that I would normally load DOS 6 on. Learn it from the command line first. Learn to setup hardware under Linux the way I used to on DOS machines. Next, I would like a verion that is GUI and runs well on a PIII 500. I'm thinking Redhad 7 for that one. To me, installing Redhat 7 and trying to learn that is putting the cart before the horse. I wouldnt have the advantage of running it for years and years like I did with DOS.
What can I do? Any comments or suggestions would be appeciated espically from people that have come from a DOS background and are learning Linux. What approaches are you taking etc.

Thanks

Jody

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

10 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  
| Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

Linux for a newbie

by XpertDragon In reply to Linux for a newbie

My suggestion would be that you could learn off of 2 linux distributions in 2 separate environments. Linux and DOS from the command line perspective are very similar. You can basically go out and find yourself a free copy of any linux distribution. My particular favorities are Storm Linux and Debian Linux based on the same technolgies basically, and are very easy to install, and easy to navigate around on. My only suggestion between the two PCs that you want to put Linux on, and the best possible learnig curve is: 1.) Install Any Linux Distribution you want on the slower 486 PC, however without the X-Windows/GUI environment, this PC can serve as your primary "Command line" learning box, for all commands that are based right from that environment. This will allow you to better understand directory structures, user/directory permissions. On the faster PC, the PIII, 500, install it with the GUI/X-windows environment with a KDE Desktop environment which is common with Redhat, and this way you can learn more about installation of BIN files, TAR files and desktop customization. Either way, have Fun with learning off of both Linux boxes you create. There are plenty of command line Linux references out on the web free for browsing and downloading.

Paul

Collapse -

Linux for a newbie

by jodyc In reply to Linux for a newbie

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Linux for a newbie

by dpalsen In reply to Linux for a newbie

I've installed Mandrake to dual-boot on a Celeron 500. The newest version (8.1) runs quite well on that system, and for some applications, CD-Burning especially, I've found it to be better than Windows. It's also got lots of nice graphical setup screens, so it's a good way to start up the learning curve. After you've learned all there is to learn about that, go to RedHat 7.x, and work with that. As for the text-only, get an older version of RedHat to work with.

Collapse -

Linux for a newbie

by jodyc In reply to Linux for a newbie

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Linux for a newbie

by mmcdade In reply to Linux for a newbie

"To me, installing Redhat 7 and trying to learn that is putting the cart before the horse...the advantage of running [it] for years and years..what can I do?"

I've always wondered myself what the "FUN" command does in Linux. Personally, I'd take the approach from the post by "Chavez Chavez". Those "points" and simple are worth heeding. Although your question is broad, the core of the question/dilemna is always: "...putting the cart before the horse."

Define both your business and learningneeds. In the meantime, you can't help but learn from the questions you've asked.

Best of luck!

- Mark

Collapse -

Linux for a newbie

by mmcdade In reply to Linux for a newbie

[it] meaning "DOS", from the context of your question, and -- an errata(!): "The tips, learning and troubleshooting suggestions approached by Chavez are, in general, always worth heeding."

- Mark

Collapse -

Linux for a newbie

by jodyc In reply to Linux for a newbie

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Linux for a newbie

by PhiltheGreat In reply to Linux for a newbie

You say " My background is of course with Windows products. I know DOS very well. Novell Lan manager etc. of course Windows NT/2000.
I suggest you are learning the Linux for your future needs.
My suggestion:
1) Define your goals first: if you arelearning for your network (you use WinNT); so try to install the Linux on at least two computers and use them in a network settings.
Because using Linux in a single computer context cannot contribute much to your network experience. Plus, install the server if you needs to practice more.
2) Linux is not very difficult in GUI settings; and I find the SUSE and Redhat very user-friendly and easy to configure.
3) One suggestion: the security and server environment are the future of Linux. I meanset them as one of your focus of study.

Collapse -

Linux for a newbie

by jodyc In reply to Linux for a newbie

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

Collapse -

Linux for a newbie

by jodyc In reply to Linux for a newbie

This question was auto closed due to inactivity

Back to Linux Forum
10 total posts (Page 1 of 1)  

Related Discussions

Related Forums