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Long Logins and Logouts

By techrepublic ·
I have a small biz network running 2 workstations running XP Pro SP1 and one server running Windows 2003 Server. The logon and logout times can take anywhere from 5-10 minutes.
Any ideas

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by alexey386 In reply to Long Logins and Logouts

Maybe kill XP and setup W2k or NT4.

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by SyscoKid In reply to Long Logins and Logouts

Do you use a login script? Something in that may be bogging down.

Do you use roaming profiles? Check the size, especially temp internet files.

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by w2ktechman In reply to Long Logins and Logouts

It sounds like a small network so I doubt login scripts or roaming profiles would be the problem. But you can clean up the system a little. Also, try unplugging the system from the network and login, if it comes up fast, then there is a networking issue.
Is your server configured as a dhcp server? or are you using static IP addresses. Check for the proper configuration as far as the subnet, gateway. It sounds like there is a communication problem, so another thing to try would be to replace one of the NIC cards with an identical one from the other system, it may be just non compatible NICS.

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by Skitzizzy In reply to Long Logins and Logouts

Also check that the systems are not trying to communicate to any share names which are no longer available, as these checks have a timeout value which can delay logons and logoffs.

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by Soekratis In reply to Long Logins and Logouts

Windows 2000 and 2003 relies so much on dns. if your dns is not set up correctly, this could be the symtom. If you are using dhcp, perhaps it is a good idea to assign a static ip to both your workstation since it is a very small network. Just in case, make sure that the server has a static ip. The reason i mentioned this is because if your workstation is not pointing correctly to a server for authentication, even though your workstation may eventually logon, it will take a long time to logon and logoff. If your network is a domain model, make sure that to join the domain correctly.

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