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  • #4006277

    Malicious software and hardware in mouse?

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    by Oblivion99 ·

    Hello

    I assume a mouse like Logitech G302 can hold some data? Since it autoruns software / driver, when you connect it.

    1.
    Can you transfer malicious software to a mouse like Logitech G302, and then use it to infect a computer with malicious software?

    2.
    Can you scan a mouse like Logitech G302 for malicious software etc.?

    3.
    Can hidden hardware in a mouse like Logitech G302 be used as cellular internet hub, and then “steal” / transfer data from the computer, without the user knowing?

    I am not looking for guides / tips on how to do it.
    Just wanna know if it possible, and if it is only something like the NSA could do.

    Thank you

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    • #4006283
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      Reply To: Malicious software and hardware in mouse?

      by birdmantd ·

      In reply to Malicious software and hardware in mouse?

      I suppose anything is possible. At least in the US, electronic devices have to receive FCC/FTC approval in which the manufacturer must disclose their product’s elements/capabilities. Are you concerned about your personal security or just curious about the topic?

      Personally, I use a Logitech G903 SE mouse and have never been concerned about such things.

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by Avatar photobirdmantd.
    • #4006293
      Avatar photo

      Re: driver

      by kees_b ·

      In reply to Malicious software and hardware in mouse?

      It’s not the mouse that runs the driver. It’s Windows that does it, after it detects a mouse. USB devices can tell what they are, as part of the connection protocol.

      • #4006310
        Avatar photo

        Agreed with Kees_b

        by birdmantd ·

        In reply to Re: driver

        It’s not the tail that wags the dog.

        • #4006968

          Reply To: Malicious software and hardware in mouse?

          by Oblivion99 ·

          In reply to Agreed with Kees_b

          Can you try to elaborate?
          And also answer 1, 2, 3?

          Thank you

      • #4006945

        Reply To: Malicious software and hardware in mouse?

        by Oblivion99 ·

        In reply to Re: driver

        My questions are regarding after manufacturer. If a person could do 1 and 3.

        I am not a person of interest / high profile. Just curious about the topic.

    • #4008150

      Reply To: Malicious software and hardware in mouse?

      by umairkasra786 ·

      In reply to Malicious software and hardware in mouse?

      Such is the case with the mouse and wireless keyboard. As it turns out, these helpful devices may be letting in viruses and hackers. That is right. Many computer users are unknowingly vulnerable.

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by umairkasra786.
      • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by Avatar photokees_b.
    • #4020323
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      If they are not wireless then there is one less point of attack

      by hal 9000 ·

      In reply to Malicious software and hardware in mouse?

      Any device like the mouse you are asking about has a certain amount of ROM on it to tell whatever it gets plugged into what it is which driver to install and so on.

      To Transfer Malicious Software it would have to have the ROM Chip Rewritten or replaced or the device supplied by a firm with suspicious Security Credentials like huawei who where banned for National Security reasons from supplying 5G critical Network Gear to quite a few countries because of Chinese Laws which required the hardware maker to report whatever the CHinese Governments tells them to.

      It is also possible that any device can be redesigned and have extra chips fitted after it leaves the factory which can have Read Only Memory or maybe Programable ROM to even Random Access Memory that can be updated by whomever redesigned the device.

      There are quite a few things that call home to Mummy to see if they will work today the leader being Microsoft Software which may have had it’s current CAL added to the list of Counterfeit Software and is stopped from working by Mummy MS when it logs in but more likely it will download and apply updates which may stop it working because the CAL is no longer recognised as Legit and you need to reregister with Microsoft to get it working again. Happens quite a lot with Volume License Software but in reality it can be used to stop anything that calls home to MUMMY to be told if it can run today.

      As Mice do not have RAM in them the likelihood is that they can not be changed easily and the person who wants to change them would need physical access to them to fit a new Circuit Board which while possible is highly unlikely. More likely is a remote device is setup somewhere that can intercept Wireless communication between WiFi Devices like Mice, Keyboards or Printers and that steals data that is being transmitted between the different devices or a Hardcore Cracker could install a device that can display any computer screen within range and save the screen images without bothering about WiFi connections. The reality however is that most WiFi between computers and networks is the easy point of attack and it is at that point that the system gets cracked.

      So in answer to your question Yes it is Possible but it would be horrendously expensive to do be all but useless it’s cheaper and easier to intercept things that call home to Mummy and that is just about every piece of software on any computer to see if it needs updating and cracking any server at a

    • #4038153

      Malicious software and hardware in mouse?

      by seoqservicesit ·

      In reply to Malicious software and hardware in mouse?

      It is possible for malicious software (also known as malware) to be installed on a computer through a compromised mouse, but it is unlikely. Mice typically do not have enough storage capacity or processing power to host malware.

      However, it is possible for attackers to disguise malware as mouse drivers or other legitimate software that can be downloaded and installed on a computer. This is known as a “trojan horse” attack, and it can be used to gain access to sensitive information on the computer or to control the computer remotely.

      As for hardware, it is also possible for a malicious component to be installed inside a mouse. For example, a tiny microchip or other device could be installed to intercept keystrokes or steal sensitive information.

      However, such attacks are rare and typically require physical access to the mouse. In general, it is much more common for malware to be spread through other vectors such as email attachments, malicious websites, or software downloads.

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