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Martin's Musings

By rmwalz ·
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How did we live without Google and Travelocity?

by rmwalz In reply to Martin's Musings

I used to be very disciplined about planning ahead for trips, travel reservations, and the like.? That was when I was working part-time and had my life "under control."? Now I'm in the workforce full-time, and my life is pretty much out of control.? At the same time, I've learned to relax and prioritize better than I used to.? I'm loving technology right now.? I waited until nearly the last moment to sign up for a college reunion, and by the time I got around to sending in my information, the reserved hotel rooms in a city 500 miles from where I live were gone.? What to do?? Go to Travelocity and search for hotels with rooms on the desired date then go to Mapquest to see how far the room was from the event.? Twenty years ago I couldn't have done this.??Now if technology was truly wonderful, I wouldn't have to be looking for a hotel room because I'd be able to attend virtually, but that's another conversation.? And here's where I'm torn.? I want to go and hug people and make a physical connection.? I don't want to attend the virtual meeting.? I'm not sure what having an avatar would allow me to do, but I'm thinking it wouldn't be as satisfying as reaching out and physically touching someone.? That leads me to the following questions. Do we have too much technology or not enough?? Is the technology we have an asset or a liability?? Am I happier now that I can procrastinate with no consequences to myself, or was I happier when my life was more limited and I was more disciplined? I'd really like to hear from others who have worked through these questions.? I reserve the right to not be persuaded by your arguments, but I still want to hear them.?

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Punctuation in the new age

by rmwalz In reply to Martin's Musings

Apparently the typing skills I learned so many years ago are no longer relevant in the blog world.? My first attempt (yesterday) included many extraneous codes.? It reminded me to the "Reveal Codes" function in WordPerfect.? Just type and type and type seems to be the way to go.? It took my English teachers many years to stop my stream-of-consciousness style of writing, and now that seems to be the thing in vogue.? I'd switch thoughts, but my mind is conditioned to think of a new paragraph.? Hmmmmm I wonder if I can manage this with the drop-down menu.? Now what happens when I try this?? I've grown very accustomed to WYSIWIG applications, and it's difficult for me to just type and not know what the formatting will look like until I've submitted my content.? Oh, well.? I've been thinking that I needed to get more comfortable with risk, and this is a way to do that with few possibilities of repercussions.? What does this look like?? It didn't look like much, so I had to edit it.? How about this??

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Is planning dead?

by rmwalz In reply to Martin's Musings

I saw today that Tregoe of Kepner-Tregoe passed away, and I was saddened by the news.? I see a dearth of problem-solving skills in today's business leaders, and Tregoe's passing will not help that.? Mr. Tregoe wrote books about and consulted in that field.? I wish some of my leadership team was reading those books because it seems to me that we are forever engaged in the "ready, fire, aim" school of handling problems.? Just today, a person in my upper management team made a decision that will cost the company money based on it "feeling" right rather than having an objective reason for making the decision.? If this were an isolated case, it would be one thing, but this was just a normal day.? If someone reads this and has successfully helped their management team become more intentional about decision-making, please let me know how you did it.

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Is planning dead?

by sMoRTy71 In reply to Is planning dead?

I find that it oftens swings to either extreme. So you either have the
"go-by-the-gut" approach that you are experiencing or you get the
"you'd-better-give-me-reams-of-data-before-we-act" approach that
stifles all momentum.<br />
<br />
I think that some people simply get lazy and prefer to use their
position as an excuse to not do the necessary research or planning
("I'm the boss, so you just have to do it."). <br />
<br />Plus, it also depends on the competence of the individual making
the snap decisions. Malcolm Gladwell's latest book "Blink" asserts that
competent people often make good decisions very quickly.<br />
<br />
If only there were more competent people... :)<br />

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Mobile phones and connectedness

by rmwalz In reply to Martin's Musings

Just got back from a family reunion out of state.? Most of us were not from the city where we gathered, and many of us had rental cars.? Getting around was a bit difficult since no one had a good map of the city.? Our solution was to use mobile phones to call the local family members and get directions.? I think we ranged farther afield than we might have otherwise because we felt that someone was only a phone call away to help us if we got lost.? We also took some trips 40 or more miles away from the city.? Since no one vehicle was large enough to carry us all, we "convoyed" to those destinations.? It's not always easy to keep the convoy vehicle immediately ahead of you in sight, so we used our cell phones to keep the group together, too.? These are uses of technology that helped keep us connected, but there are applications of technology that serve to separate people.? I work in a place that does that, so I want to keep reminding myself of the positive and collaborative uses of technology.

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