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mouse and keyboard are not working

By vikki.louden ·
I installed a driver to work along with my printer. The computer was not printing on the paper for some reason but it deteced that there was ink in the catridges. So i messed around with the USB ports and everything went out. Didnt think nothing of it because the wires are somewhat sensitve. When the Windows screen came on I could not move the mouse nor the keyboard. I replaced the mouse and keyboard but that was not the issue. I've used both PS/2 and USB but nothing works. They do work in my laptop with no problems. I've also tried plugging the all mice and keyboards into and old computer i had around the house and the mouse worked but not the keyboard. Do you think its a power issue in my apartment? I also realized that one of the fans is not running unless i tap the tower.

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First thougth.......

by ---TK--- In reply to mouse and keyboard are no ...

No not a power issue in the apt. When you boot up using PS/2 ports, they have to be plugged in before you boot the PC, or they will not work! When you use your USB keyboard and mouse, it ususally takes a few min (depending on how fast your system is) for the OS to pick them up, and install the right drivers. I have seen it take up to 10 minutes for the OS to pick them up/ remap them....

Just give it some time, and it should work.

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What does this mean?

by OH Smeg In reply to mouse and keyboard are no ...

So i messed around with the USB ports and everything went out.

If you tried to reset or remove the USB ports you could have adversely affected other things or do you mean that you just played with the wires?

If you didn't follow the directions with the printer on how to install it you generally will not have a working printer after you finish. Most times Printer makers require you to load the drivers and only turn on the printer when you are instructed to by the Software install Application after the Drivers have been installed.

Now for the Keyboard & Mouse issue. Refit the PS2 Keyboard & Mouse and try to enter BIOS when you boot the system. This generally involves pressing Delete or F2 while either the POST Screen is present or the System Makers Logo in on the screen. The required key to press is always listed on the Bottom Left Hand corner of the screen so press the one listed there.

If you can enter BIOS the Keyboard is working so you need to look at repairing what you did to the computer. If you didn't mess with the USB Port Settings unplug all f the USB Leads nd allow the system to start and then add 1 USB Lead at a time till the Keyboard & or Mouse stop working or you have everything connected.

If you altered setting inside Windows you will probably need to perform a Repair/In Place Install by following the directions here

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315341

But you need a M$ Branded Install Disc not a System Makers Recovery Disc to do this.

The following is the important bit on the site.

Prerequisites
Windows Installation CD
Before you start, have your Windows installation CD and the product key available. Without these, you cannot reinstall Windows. If Windows was preinstalled on your computer, contact the computer manufacturer for help in obtaining the Windows installation files and product key.
Device drivers
Many of the device drivers for your hardware components are integrated into Windows. However, devices such as printers, monitors, graphic cards, sound cards, modems, external drives, and scanners usually have separate installation CDs. If you do not have all the drivers for your hardware components, you can download the drivers from the Internet and then write them to a CD.

If your computer requires a third-party mass storage device driver or hardware abstraction layer (HAL), make sure that you have a copy of the files on a separate storage media before you start the reinstallation.
Internet Explorer 7
If Internet Explorer 7 is installed on your computer, you must uninstall it before you reinstall Windows XP. For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
**7964 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/**7964/) How to perform a repair installation of Windows XP if Internet Explorer 7 is installed
Programs
Collect and store the CDs and product keys for your programs in an appropriate location so that you can reinstall the programs after you have reinstalled Windows. These programs may include the following: ? Microsoft Office programs
? Antivirus software
? CD writing software
? Internet Provider software

Data backup
Before you reinstall Windows, back up all important data to another location. Data that you may want to back up could include the following: ? My Documents (documents, pictures, music, videos)
? Program folders (configuration data, user data)
? Favorites
? Address books
? E-mail messages
? Document templates
? Macros
? Boilerplates
The original backup copies of your registry files (located in the %systemroot%\Repair folder) are replaced when the reinstallation is completed. These original registry files in the Repair folder were created either when you started Windows XP or when you last used the Backup utility to back up the system state. If you think that you might have to use the registry backups after the reinstallation is complete, copy these registry backup files to another location before you perform the reinstallation.
Network settings
You can restore certain network settings after you reinstall Windows. Before you start the reinstallation, record your computer's network settings so that they can easily be available if this step is required. These settings include the following: ? Computer name
? Workgroup or domain
? TCP/IP settings
To find these settings, do the following steps:1. To find these settings, click Start and then click Run.
2. Type control ncpa.cpl in the Open text field and then click OK.
3. Right-click Local Area Connection and then right-click Properties.
4. Record the network settings.

Internet provider information
To make sure that you can reconnect to the Internet after you have reinstalled Windows, record your Internet provider information. This includes user name, password information, and names of mail servers.
Startup sequence
Warning This procedure may involve changing your CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) settings and changing your Basic Input/Output System (BIOS). Incorrect changes to the BIOS of your computer can result in serious problems. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems that result from changes to your BIOS can be solved. Change your CMOS settings at your own risk. Incorrect or corrupted CMOS and BIOS settings can cause startup problems or shutdown problems.

If you must adjust the BIOS startup sequence of your computer so that it can start from the installation CD, the sequence should be in the following order: ? CD drive
? Hard disk
? Floppy disk drive
During startup, BIOS searches for a disk that has an operating system it can load. On a computer that has an operating system installed, this is usually the hard disk. The BIOS is configured to search disks on the computer in a certain order, called the startup sequence. If the computer hard disk is configured in the BIOS as the first disk in the startup sequence, the computer starts by using the hard disk and does not search the CD drive for a startup disk.

To configure the BIOS to search the CD drive for a startup disk before it searches the hard disk, follow these steps: 1. Restart your computer.
2. When the computer first starts, it performs the power-on self test (POST). This test checks that all connected devices are functioning. As part of the POST, the memory is checked. During the memory test, a message will appear that tells you how to access the BIOS. For example, you may see the following message or a similar message that explains how to start the BIOS setup:
PRESS DEL TO ENTER SETUP
In this example, you must press the DEL key immediately after the memory test is finished to start the setup process. You may have to press the key several times to make sure that you access the BIOS setup.

Tip There are other keys that may provide access to the BIOS. They include the following: ? F1
? F2
? F10
? CTRL+ENTER
? ALT+ENTER
? CTRL+ALT+ESC
? CTRL+ALT+INSERT
If you are not sure how to access the BIOS setup, see the user manual for your computer's motherboard.
3. Look for the startup sequence settings (also known as boot sequence or boot order). You can usually use the arrow keys to move through the menus and settings.
4. When you find the startup sequence setting, you can usually press ENTER to modify it. Press the PLUS SIGN (+) or MINUS SIGN (-) key until the CD drive is selected as the startup disk.

Tip More information about how to modify the BIOS can be found in your user manual. It usually contains descriptions of the menus and instructions on how to modify the options. The BIOS itself usually contains context-sensitive Help with the individual steps.
5. As soon as you have specified the CD drive as the first location to search for a startup disk, you can usually press ESC to return to the menus. In the main menu, select the option SAVE AND EXIT SETUP or a similar option. When the confirmation SAVE TO CMOS AND EXIT or a similar option appears, select YES.
6. If you cannot select YES, type the letter y.

Note BIOS uses a QWERTY keyboard layout. If your keyboard settings follow a different layout, you will have to press the Y key as it appears on a QWERTY keyboard.
7. After you exit the BIOS setup, your computer will restart.
8. Make sure that the computer starts by using the CD drive. Insert the Windows XP installation CD and restart the computer. If this is successful, you can start reinstalling Windows XP.
If you are not comfortable trying to perform this task, you may want to ask someone whom you know for help. Or you may want to contact Microsoft Support to help you resolve this issue.
Windows XP preinstalled
If Windows XP was preinstalled on your computer, view the following article before you continue with reinstallation:
312369 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/312369/) You may lose data or program settings after reinstalling, repairing, or upgrading Windows XP
Note If Windows XP was preinstalled on your computer, you may not have the Repair option that you may require during the reinstallation process. Contact your computer manufacturer to make sure that you have the installation CD for a repair install.
Windows XP Service Pack 2
If Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) is already installed on your computer, you must reinstall SP2 after you reinstall Windows XP. One way to do this is to combine the SP2 files with the Windows XP files and reinstall them at the same time. Follow the links in this section to try this method.

Note There are also two methods to reinstall SP2 separately after you have reinstalled Windows XP. You can find those two methods in the "After you reinstall Windows XP" section.

Note Service packs are cumulative. Each new service pack contains all the fixes that are included with earlier service packs and any new fixes. You do not have to install an earlier version of a service pack before you install the latest version. For example, you only have to install Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2), you do not have to install Windows XP Service Pack 1a (SP1a).
Combine the Service Pack 2 files together with the Windows XP setup files
For more information about combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
894947 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894947/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 1: Introduction)
894948 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894948/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 2: Copying the Windows CD to the hard disk)
894949 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894949/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 3: Integrating Service Pack 2 in the Setup files)
894950 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/894950/) Combining Windows XP with Service Pack 2 for reinstallation (Part 4: Reading the boot image file)
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Reinstall Windows XP
To reinstall Windows XP, try either of the following methods. If the first method does not work, try the second.

Note You may want to disconnect from the Internet during the installation. This helps protect you from malicious users.
Method 1: Start the reinstallation from Windows XP
To reinstall Windows XP by using Windows XP CD, follow these steps: 1. Start your computer.
2. Insert the Windows XP CD in your computer's CD drive or DVD drive.
3. On the Welcome to Windows XP page, click Install Windows XP.
4. On the Welcome to Windows Setup page, click Upgrade (Recommended) in the Installation Type box (if it is not already selected), and then click Next.
5. On the License Agreement page, click I accept this agreement, and then click Next.
6. On the Your Product Key page, type the 25-character product key in the Product key boxes, and then click Next.
7. On the Get Updated Setup Files page, select the option that you want, and then click Next.
8. Follow the instructions that appear on the screen to reinstall Windows XP.
If you successfully completed the reinstallation, congratulations. You are almost done. Please continue to the "After you reinstall Windows XP" section to finish.

If you received an error or if the reinstallation did not finish, try method 2.
Method 2: Repair install of Windows XP by starting your computer from the Windows XP CD
Note If Windows XP was preinstalled on your computer, you may need the installation CD to reinstall. Contact your computer manufacturer to make sure that you have the installation CD for a repair installation.

To reinstall Windows XP by starting your computer from the Windows XP CD, follow these steps: 1. Insert the Windows XP CD into your computer's CD drive or DVD drive, and then restart your computer.
2. When you receive the "Press any key to boot from CD" message on the screen, press a key to start your computer from the Windows XP CD.
3. The following message on the Welcome to Setup screen will appear:
This portion of the Setup program prepares Microsoft Windows XP to run on your computer: To setup Windows XP now, press ENTER. To repair a Windows XP installation by using Recovery Console, press R. To quit Setup without installing Windows XP, press F3.
4. Press ENTER to set up Windows XP.
5. On the Windows XP Licensing Agreement screen, press F8 to agree to the license agreement.
6. Make sure that your current installation of Windows XP is selected in the box, and then press R to repair Windows XP.
7. Follow the instructions that appear on the screen to reinstall Windows XP. After you repair Windows XP, you may have to reactivate your copy of Windows XP. For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
310064 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310064/) How to troubleshoot Windows XP Setup problems when you upgrade from Windows 98 or Windows Millennium Edition
If you successfully completed the reinstallation, congratulations. You are almost done. Please continue to the "After you reinstall Windows XP" section to finish.

If you received an error or if the reinstallation did not finish, unfortunately, this article did not resolve your problem. For your next steps, you may want to ask someone whom you know for help. Or, you may want to contact Microsoft Support to help you resolve this problem.
Back to the top

After you reinstall Windows XP
After you finish the reinstallation, complete the following final tasks.

Note You may also want to enable the firewall in Internet Explorer. For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
283673 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/283673/) How to turn on or turn off the firewall in Windows XP
Reinstall Windows XP Service Pack 2
If Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) was installed on your computer before you reinstalled Windows XP, you must reinstall SP2. If you did not already reinstall SP2 with the Windows XP in the previous section, use one of the following methods to reinstall SP2 now.
Method 1: Obtain the service pack CD and reinstall the service pack after you reinstall Windows XP
To order Windows Service Pack 2 on CD, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/updates/sp2/cdorder/en_us/default.mspx (http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/updates/sp2/cdorder/en_us/default.mspx)
Method 2: Download the service pack after you reinstall Windows XP
For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
322389 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322389/) How to obtain the latest Windows XP service pack
Reinstall all updates to Windows
After you reinstall Windows XP, you must reinstall all updates to Windows also. To reinstall Windows updates, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com (http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com)
Reinstall Internet Explorer 7
When Windows XP is repaired and is running correctly, reinstall Internet Explorer 7. To do this, you will need the Internet Explorer 7 installation package. This package is available through Windows Update. Also, the package may still be on the computer from the first time that you installed Internet Explorer 7. Locate the installation package in the folder in which you saved the files, and reinstall the program.

Note This package may be located in the Temporary Internet Files folder. If you cannot locate the Internet Explorer 7 installation package, visit the following Microsoft Web site to obtain this package:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/downloads/default.mspx (http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/downloads/default.mspx)
To connect to the Microsoft download site, you must have a functional Web browser. If Internet Explorer 6 does not work on the computer after you uninstall Internet Explorer 7, you cannot download the Internet Explorer 7 installation package. In this situation, you can use a computer that has a functional Web browser to download the Internet Explorer 7 installation package. Then, use a shared network drive to install the program onto the repaired computer. If you cannot use a shared network for this purpose, copy the Internet Explorer 7 installation package onto a CD, and install Internet Explorer 7 on the repaired computer from the CD.

If you had difficulty completing these final steps, unfortunately, this content is unable to help you any further. So, you might want to ask someone for help, or you might want to contact Support.

Col

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keyboard not working

by vikki.louden In reply to What does this mean?

The Keyboard is not working so I can not do any of this.

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Well if you can not enter BIOS

by OH Smeg In reply to keyboard not working

You only have one option available to you. It has to go to a Shop for repairs but I didn't ask you to open Windows I asked you could you enter BIOS the First thing you should see when you boot the system is either a Power On Self Test Screen with lots of Specifications of the system or a System Makers/M'Board Makers Logo.

At this point I asked you to push either the Delete or F2 Keys on a PS2 Keyboard plugged into the computer.

If it's not working at thins stage and the keyboard works on a different computer the M'Board is damaged and needs replacing.

You can double check this function by removing all of the USB Leads/Devices from the computer and try again if it still will not enter BIOS the M'Board is history so you should decide if it's worth the cost of Repairs or if you want to buy a new one.

Col

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Take it to the shop for repairs.......

by ThumbsUp2 In reply to mouse and keyboard are no ...

You said: "So i messed around with the USB ports and everything went out. Didnt think nothing of it because the wires are somewhat sensitve."

If you've shorted something out by causing a spark, chances are you'll need to replace the motherboard. Take it to a repair shop and let them use their diagnostic equipment to determine if you've already destroyed it.

.

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Take it to the shop for repairs.......

by vikki.louden In reply to Take it to the shop for r ...

thats not it because we took it downstairs to computer store and it worked.

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Have them come upstairs with you....

by ThumbsUp2 In reply to Take it to the shop for r ...

... and see what is different at that location vs. their location.

Is this, perhaps, a wireless keyboard and mouse? If so, where is the receiver being placed that would be different than where it was at downstairs?

.

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Have them come upstairs with you....

by vikki.louden In reply to Have them come upstairs w ...

What do you think about the fan not working?

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""What do you think about the fan not working?"", i would get a new one.

Get a new keyboard so that you can test it out. :)

Please post back if you have any more problems or questions.
If this information is useful, please mark as helpful. Thanks.

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frustrated!!!!!

by vikki.louden In reply to ""What do you think about ...

I've bought new keyboards new mice USB and PS/2 ports and nothing is working in that computer. Its works on my laptop. How do you explain it working on other computers and also it working outside the home?

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