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Multiple router Network with Access Point

By MasterC3501 ·
Ok so this is what I am trying to accomplish. We have several devices that are going to be put on the network many wired and many wireless.

My plan : I have the linksys E3000N router. The location I am going to has a netgear wireless G router on the network.

What I "plan" to do is hook up the modem and the E3000 as normal network setup. Now in another room where the netgear is. I was thinking I would get a WAP610N access point and configure it to connect to the E3000 wirelessly and plug it into the netgear for the hardwired devices. Now if the wireless is turned off I think this should work fine and wireless devices would feed off the E3000, however is it possible to also have the netgear feeding out a wireless signal so that if the signal is weak or slow from the E3000 that the signal is essentially extended through the netgear and that wireless signal can be used as well. Now I also am hoping that the "network" will look as just one whole network and not two separate ones etc.

I have been looking all over the internet for the answers I am looking for but can?t find anything relevant to the situation I am in.

Also if there is just 1 device I can get that will do this with the E3000 please let me know, meaning I eliminate the netgear and access point all together and just get one device for that room that allows for wireless access and hardwired access on the same network without having to run cables. So it should receive a wireless signal and send one out at the same time.

If anyone can help me with some clarity I would greatly appreciate it as this has been just giving me a huge headache.

Thanks

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RE: Multiple router Network with Access Point

by lgarbarini In reply to Multiple router Network w ...

Ok from what I can tell you are planning on using the WAP610N as a wireless bridge and connecting the Netgear to that bridge? If my assumptions are correct (tell me if they aren't) then you can (However I don't know what exactly is the goal of this project). First Setup the E3000 as you said and connect the WAP610N to the E3000 in bridge mode. Then on the Netgear DO NOT connect it to the network first and change the following settings, First make sure the IP address of the netgear is not within the DHCP server's (on the E3000) pool of addresses or that it does not conflict with the static address of the other device. Then disable the DHCP server on the Netgear. Then set the wireless SSID on the network to the same name but a different channel (preferably six channels apart for best performance). Now connect the WAP610N to a LAN port DO NOT CONNECT IT TO THE LAN PORT! After that you should be good to go. **There are some devices that will show the same SSID twice but most will swich seamlessly between the two.**

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RE: Multiple router Network with Access Point

by MasterC3501 In reply to RE: Multiple router Netwo ...

You post kind of conflicts with itself a bit can you clearify? For instance you said plug the wap610n into the e3000 but later you said to plug it into the netgear. Then you said plg it in a LAN but DO NOT PLUG IT IN A LAN.... i think one of those are a typo lol and im honestly not sure which. In this whole deal you said at the beginning that what i was trying to do may not be best way. Is there something else I can do to accomplish my goals? I am willing to purchase another device. The only stimpulations are I for sure want the E3000 on the network and I need hardwire ports for the second room. Other than that any suggestion on altering what I am doing at all would be extremely helpful. I posted this on 4 sites. Your so far the only one to respond. Thanks again I am appreciative. Hope to hear back soon

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Oops

by lgarbarini In reply to RE: Multiple router Netwo ...

Sorry I need to reread my posts before I publish them... But before anything else I looked into your problem more carefully and i think you need a WET610N not a WAP610N to connect wired devices to a wireless network... First I meant for you to connect the WAP610N (or is it WET610N?) to the E3000 WIRELESSLY (sorry not clear on my part)
LAN but DO NOT PLUG IT IN A WAN is what I meant...Also a better way if you are willing to buy two devices the WAP610N (again is it the WET610N?) and a range extender that would simplify the setup dramatically... I addition there MAY be a single device solution this device: http://www.hawkingtech.com/products/productlist.php?CatID=19&FamID=84&ProdID=400
will repeat the wireless signal but it is unclear whether it acts as a bridge...

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RE: Oops

by MasterC3501 In reply to Oops

I was referencing WAP610N but I have not purchased it yet so its not required. I looked at the WET610N and I have never had any experience with any access points or bridges in the past so I am not totally knowledgable about how they work.

So if I am understanding correctly.... I would have the e3000 hooked up in room 1, then i would configure the WET610N to access the network provided by the e3000 and hookit into the netgear LAN port (and not the wan port). Does any configuration need to take place on the netgear?

If the above is correct how will it work? If i am understanding right the e3000 would have its network rockin and the netgear ethernet ports would be configured exactly as if the devices were plugged into the e3000 even though they are in the netgear but the wireless will technacally have 2 wireless clouds and when accessing wireless in the house whatever wireless device we are using will essencially transition between the two networks depending on which is giving out the best connection etc. Is that right? Thanks again for helping me understand what im doing here.

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Sorry

by lgarbarini In reply to RE: Oops

Sorry about the lateness of the reply, but I got caught up in some stuff that i had to deal with. Anyway as far as configuration goes you must: First make sure the IP address of the netgear is not within the DHCP server's (on the E3000) pool of addresses or that it does not conflict with the static address of the other device. Then disable the DHCP server on the Netgear. Then set the wireless SSID on the network to the same name but a different channel (preferably six channels apart for best performance). hope this helps.

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Range Extender?

by oldbaritone In reply to Multiple router Network w ...

Have you looked into using a wireless range extender? As others have alluded, trying to daisy-chain AP's as a way to extend coverage can get to be a headache, especially when using different brands of equipment.

A "range extender" may accomplish what you're trying to do. Inexpensive units are available from linksys (WRE54G), netgear (WGXB102) and others. They simply extend the range of the wireless network by repeating the AP or Router's signal, digitally, from an advantageous location.

They're fairly easy to set up; some routers need to be configured to allow repeating, and the unit needs to be plugged in next to the router/AP to initialize. After that, you just take it somewhere, plug it in, and forget it.

If you're looking for "flat" topology, no wires, and easy - the range extender may be a better answer for you.

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RE: Range Extender?

by MasterC3501 In reply to Range Extender?

the problem with that solution is that the second room where the netgear is has several peices of equiptment that must be hardwired into something and cannot be wireless.

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Wow a diagram could really help here....

by robo_dev In reply to RE: Range Extender?

In general, here are some pointers:

It sounds like what you may need are a WLAN bridge and a WLAN Access Point (AP).

Some WLAN APs can be configured to work strictly as a bridge or to work only as an Access Point. Some models can work as both at the same time.

An AP provides a mac-layer connection between a wired and a wireless interface, nothing more. Devices connected to the AP will get their IP address from the router where the wired devices get theirs.

Think of a WLAN bridge as a long ethernet cable. There's an ethernet jack on each end, but the middle part is a WLAN connection.

You can also buy products that are strictly WLAN bridges, as these are useful for certain types of applications such as building-to-building data links.

Just to confuse people, there are also WLAN routers, which are effectively an Access Point with a WAN router built in. It is possible to use a WLAN router as an AP through configuration, or just by disabling DHCP and plugging into one of it's LAN ports.

Even more confusing, APs can be configured as a repeater (range extender) where the WLAN device has no ethernet connection at all. These are used in wide open areas like car rental parking lots.

It is important to note that you typically cannot take 'brand A' Access Point and make a bridge by connecting to 'brand b'. This does not work.

Also, note that if the same AP or bridge radio is being used for both bridge and AP communication, the throughput is cut in half. Same thing with a repeater or range extender.


To make a diagram, here goes


Room A
WAN router
Bridge1

Room B
Bridge2
Ethernet switch for wired clients
AP for wireless clients

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Let me Reinterate the issue to make it easier

by MasterC3501 In reply to Multiple router Network w ...

I want to simplify this issue in hopes of getting some more direct answers.

I have 2 seperate rooms

One room has a wireless router which has several wired devices plugged into it.

The second room has several devices that need to be plugged in and cannot be wireless

What are some model numbers for devices that can allow those hardwired devices in the second room to have internet without running cables.... (if it can also extend the wireless signal that would be of great benefit)

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wait, you have devices that must be wired but you don't want to run wires?

by CG IT In reply to Let me Reinterate the iss ...

and you don't want them to be wireless?

so you have 2 options. running fibre.

Fibre isn't copper wire it's fibre, so there ya go :)

or ethernet over the house power wall sockets.... not sure how good those devices are...

here's a bing search:

http://www.bing.com/search?q=ethernet+over+powerline+adapter&src=IE-SearchBox&FORM=IE8SRC

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