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Network Wireing

By Digital_DNA ·
I'm getting ready to run cat5e cable to extend the distance of my lan and I have a few questions about what I need to do this.

First, do I need a crimping tool? I'm kind of confused. A friend said I need a crimping tool to make the connections. However, I was looking at the jacks and it looks more like I need a punch down tool to connect the cable to the jack. It looks to me like the only reason I would need the crimping tool would be if I were going to make patch cables. I'm not planning on doing that.

Second, it looks like the easiest way for me to run the cable is to run two seperate lengths of cable to the basement and re-attach the cable there. How do I attach the cable in the basement? Can I use a punch down block to attach the two together?

Last, what else do I need for this project? I'm assuming I'm going to need a cable tester to test the cable, punch down tool, RJ45 crimper tool (possibly), cat5e cable, jacks, wall-plates, wire cutter/stripper... I'm sure I'm missing something.

As you can probably tell I don't have a clue but some advice/help would be greatly appreciated.

thanks
ebcdic

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Network Wireing

by sgt_shultz In reply to Network Wireing

if it looks like you need to punch down the connection at the jacks, then you do. jacks are all different. look at www.blackbox.com for info. expensive but informative. cable tester. a good one is thousands. you could do with continuity tester just as well as a cheap one but admit is nice to test for crossed pairs. spend the money on a fox and hound device rather than a cheap tester...do you have a wire sales person? ask what the contractors like to use. often there the wire, cable, jacks and crimping tools that work better 'together'. they may offer free seminars. i schmoozed my free seminar instructor into free testing of my wire with his $4K tester. use solid core in the walls, plenum-rated. stranded in the patch cables...(those are theones you will need to crimp - i wouldn't make them, I would buy them, get good brand) cheap wire and accessories will cause baldness. keep in mind you may be not 'code' if you do it yourself...
the more breaks in the wire, the more 'attenuation' (weakening) of the signal. every time you cut the wire (like in the basement) you will lose signal. why not try dropping a pull string into the basement on one 'side' of the run, then drawing the cable up? all in one piece? the twists in the cable are engineered to be exactly so-to cancel out noise. so, you don't want to pull the cable too hard or bend it too sharply, that will distort the twists, see? depending on how fast and long your network is, you can get away with quite a lot of boo-boos. worst is crossed pairs. label everything and be very careful. only untwist the minimum you need to get the connection made. crossed pairs can function for the most part but cause strange disconnects and slowness. ideally, go slow and add one run at a time to aid in resolving any problems...keep the runs away from emi from flourescent lights and motor contacts...
good luck. it is not cost effective to do wiring yourself, imho.

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Network Wireing

by Digital_DNA In reply to Network Wireing

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Network Wireing

by timwalsh In reply to Network Wireing

You only need a crimping tool if you will be attaching RJ45 connectors.

As you surmise, you will need a punch-down tool to attach the CAT5 to the back of patch panels and wall jacks.

Other tools: You have most of the bases covered, except forpossibly a fish tape (for pulling cable through walls).

Connection in basement: Just to double check your intention here - It sounds like you want to run a cable from one location to the basement, run a second cable to another location, and connect the 2 cables. Is this correct? If so you CAN do this with a punchdown block. However, since there is no amplifying device (hub, switch, etc.) in the middle, the total length of the cables combined is subject to the 100m (@300 Ft.) restriction for Cat5.

Hope this helps.

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Network Wireing

by Digital_DNA In reply to Network Wireing

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by jose_12650 In reply to Network Wireing

If its a CAT5e (e for energized) your data run could be up to 1000 meters.

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by Digital_DNA In reply to Network Wireing

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by ReliableNetworking In reply to Network Wireing

Just go to Home Depot and buy the Cable and Jacks. If your only doing a few runs, the keystones (jacks) have cheap punchdown tools included in the package. Punch the cat 5 down using 568B standard on a keystone using a wall or surface jack. Plug the(store bought) patch cable into the computer and the walljack. You can use a 110 block on the other end or more wall jacks (depending on the number of runs) Use Patch cables to the router (switch or Hub) You don't need a crimper.

Cat 5e is sold in 1000' boxes and can be used for speeds higher than 100MBps however the distance is still 325' (100 meters)

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Network Wireing

by Digital_DNA In reply to Network Wireing

ReliableNetworkiing,

Actually thats exactly what I did, with exception of the 568B standard. I used the 568A and everything is working great.

Thanks
ebcdic

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Network Wireing

by Digital_DNA In reply to Network Wireing

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