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opinions wanted..

By Jaqui ·
on the business model being used by this company:

http://www.bondware.com/index.php

the fees aren't unreasonable.
( other than the setup costs for an ecommerce site )
the services are generally pretty good.
but, you MUST host with them to use thier cms solutions?

what do you think?

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Offsite hosting

by jmgarvin In reply to opinions wanted..

Pros:
You don't have to deal with networking issues
You don't have to deal with server/software updates
You don't have the typical "Why do we need reduancy" managment doodoo

Cons:
Offsite so you don't have complete control
You have to use what they have and follow their upgrade cycle
Remote CMS can be problematic if you don't have enough backend support.

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Well I can see it flying quite easily

by Tony Hopkinson In reply to opinions wanted..

There are plenty of people out there who would like to farm out or gain a web side to their business without having to go through the pain of setting one up. If I was them I'd get on with the domain name registration as well.
As for the limitation on hosting, it does give them a common interface and deployment and good control over what is used to power it, so it makes sense from that point of view, if the quality is good it shouldn't matter.
I wonder what they'd do if someone big came along with a proposal though.

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look at

by Jaqui In reply to Well I can see it flying ...

my posts re high usage web site.
it's one of thiers, 4 terabytes a month data transfer for thier "Flagship" site that showcases thier products.

http://www.renderosity.com

I think they do offer domain name registration.
they do not include it by default.

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I didn't see bandwidth limits mentioned

by stress junkie In reply to opinions wanted..

I looked at several of their pages including the pricing page. I didn't see any mention of bandwidth limits. Other hosting services that I've looked at had price points on bytes/month.

I looked them up in whois. I didn't see anything that looked obviously unsavory. They've had their domain registered since 1999. I also looked up their ISP in whois. Same thing. If either of these had been registered recently I would have said that it could be a problem.

The next step before doing business with them would be to look them up in the Better Business Bureau database and in the home state's consumer advocacy web site. They are listed in whois as being physically located in Nashville, Tennessee, USA. I don't know about Tennessee specifically but a lot of the states in the US have government run consumer advocacy web sites.

If they passed this test then I would ask them about bandwidth limits before moving ahead.

Then you want to find out if their web design tools are M$ oriented. You don't want to create a web site that is only friendly to IE. You also don't want to take someone's advice, (I won't mention names but they work for CNET), and make a web site that is only friendly to Mozilla either. :-)

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re web design tools...

by Jaqui In reply to I didn't see bandwidth li ...

I was looking at thier sdk a few months back, they only require that it fits thier api ( naturally ), and they have extremely tight testing before they will accept the plugin module as being acceptable for inclusion.
thier servers are red hat linux, and the cms is a lamp / lapp* app. :)

I have been a "member" of thier flagship site for longer than I have been a member here.

it wasn't so much a looking to do business with as a what about the concept of paying thier fees, and not having complete control over what could contain sensitive data for your business.

with all the time I have been a member of renderosity, there has never been a serious hacking attempt that was sucessfull, they actually do very well at monitoring for unwanted activities and will take legal action to stop it, before the person can do any damage.

it doesn't scale well, once you are doing 4 terabytes of data transfer a month, but it can handle up to that quite well.


*it may be postgresql rather than mysql. I have never probed to find out.

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