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Optimum Pagefile size

By godzillex ·
Hi,

I have recently upgraded my system's RAM to 768MB. The primary purpose of this PC is to run Office 2000 software, and surf the Web.

(1) What would be the ideal Pagefile size for this system?

(2) Do I even need a pagefile, considering the large amount of RAM available ?

Thanks.
godzillex

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Optimum Pagefile size

by Gr@ndcri In reply to Optimum Pagefile size

The recommended size is equivalent to 1.5 times the amount of RAM on your system.

Usually, you should leave the paging file at its recommended size, although you might increase its size if you routinely use programs that require a lot of memory.Also if you rezised your paging file to 0 you'll get an error message at boot time.

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Optimum Pagefile size

by godzillex In reply to Optimum Pagefile size

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Optimum Pagefile size

by AirHockeyNinja In reply to Optimum Pagefile size

Microsoft states that the ideal pagefile size is 1.5 times the ammount of RAM that you have installed. In reality with that much RAM, an equal sized pagefile should be sufficient. YES you need a pagefile. If you don't have one, as soon as the RAM fills up, and it WILL happen, your computer is going to crash- and you will loose anything not specifically saved. Likely you will also recieve several error messages. If I can be of further help, please Email me.

Joe

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Optimum Pagefile size

by godzillex In reply to Optimum Pagefile size

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Optimum Pagefile size

by TheChas In reply to Optimum Pagefile size

I set up my systems rather conservatively for stability over performance.

I usually allow Windows to have a separate 2GB or larger partition to use as it wishes for the page / swap file.

If I feel a need to limit the size of the page file, I use the following formula:

The larger of 1GB - Installed RAM,
or 2 times installed RAM.

For your specific system configuration, I would set the paging file to 1.5GB

You may be able to get by with just 1GB or even 500MB for the swap file. It is a matter of how many windows you allow open at one time.

The more open windows, programs, and processes, the larger the paging file needs to be.

Chas

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Optimum Pagefile size

by godzillex In reply to Optimum Pagefile size

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by embassy_16 In reply to Optimum Pagefile size

When you installed the extra RAM and rebooted, your operating system increased the size of your paging file for you.

Do you need a pagefile? YES

Ideal Pagefile size: If a page file is too small, applications might run short on virtual memory. If a page file is too large, you might be wasting disk space that could be used for other purposes.

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Optimum Pagefile size

by godzillex In reply to Optimum Pagefile size

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by godzillex In reply to Optimum Pagefile size

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Optimum Pagefile size

by jwilczyn In reply to Optimum Pagefile size

By default, Windows places the pagefile on the boot partition where the operating system is installed. To determine the size of the pagefile multiply the amount of physical RAM by 1.5 to a maximum of 4095MB. However, placing the pagefile on the bootpartition does not optimize performance because Windows has to perform disk I/O on both the system directory and the pagefile. Therefore, it is recommended that you place the pagefile on a different partition and different physical hard disk drive so that Windows can handle multiple I/O requests more quickly.
The optimal solution is to create one pagefile on the boot partition using the default settings and create one pagefile on another less frequently used partition. The best option is to create the second pagefile so that it is on its own partition, with no data or operating system-specific files.

Windows will use the pagefile on the less frequently used partition over the pagefile on the heavily used boot partition. Windows uses an internal algorithm to determine which page file to use for virtual memory management.
The page file on the less frequently used partition will be used the majority of the time because it is not on a busy partition.
Another advantage of using a pagefile on its own partition is that the pagefile will not become fragmented. If the pagefile is on a partition with other data, the pagefile might experience fragmentation as it expands to satisfy the extra virtual memory required. A defragmented pagefile leads to faster virtual memory access and improves the chances of capturing a dump file without significant errors.
MS - Q197379

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