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PC Performance

By vmaniks ·
Dear All

I had recently purchased the pc with the following configuration :
Windows 2000 professional operating system
Pentium IV 2.53 Ghz processor
ASUS P4T533C motherboard
1GB RDRAM @ 1066 Mhz
Seagate Barracutta 40GB @ 7200 rpm
Seagate Barracutta 80GB @ 7200 rpm
Creative Audigy platinum sound card
Creative 5.1 inspire speakers
Sony 40X CD writer
Samsung 16X DVD Rom
Asus V8460 Ultra GF4TI4600 128MB Memory AGP card

Created a following partition :
In 40GB - C and D drives
In 80GB - E,F and G drives

To get a maximum performance requesting all to recommend me what is the paging size i have to set in all drives or whatever recommended.
Expecting your earliest reply in this regard

Thanks

Manikandan V
India

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by dmiles In reply to PC Performance

In this setup I would setup the paging file on one of the logical drives

It is best to set the Initial size and Maximum Size values the same to avoid fragmentation of the page file as it grows
A minimum value of 2.5 times the amount of physical memory.

For more info see the following:
www.is-it-true.org/nt/atips178.shtml
cut and paste in Address bar
Also refer to previous posts in Tech Republic using search in upper right corner pertaining to paging file setup

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by vmaniks In reply to PC Performance

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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PC Performance

by KhongPhuTu In reply to PC Performance

Hi,

1. Paging size for NT4 should be 2.5 times the amount of physical RAM or 2.5 GB, not W2K.
2. Since you have W2K Pro, you only need about 1.5 times (1.1x min recommended) the physical RAM you have or 1.5GB. To gain the best performance outof the paging file you must know or make best guess as to how the physical disks will be access for read/write and the frequency.

3. Generally, putting the paging file in a least read/write accessed physical disk is the best way to go, assuming of course you set up the paging file right from the beginning before populating the physical disk with data. Putting the paging file on the same physcal disk but separate logical disk yields little in performance.

4. Since your 2nd drive is bigger, I presume that you'll be keeping more of your data there. If your apps access these data in the second physical drive more than the sum of the access by the apps and the OS in the 1st physical drive (C: or ), then it's better to put the page\ing file in the 1st physical drive.

5. If you want a full core dump when the system (not apps) crashes, then you must have on the OS [logical/physical] drive the paging file of size at least 110% of the physical RAM or, in your case, 1.1 GB paging file in the C: drive.

6. It's also good but to a lesser extent to have more than one paging file (at least one in each physical drive).

7. Fragmentation is a fact of life in NT (NT4 and W2K) that can not be avoided. Buy defragmenting software to automate defragmentation or manually do it periodically.

Confucius

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by vmaniks In reply to PC Performance

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by F-Baer In reply to PC Performance

at 1 gb-ram u don?t need a swap file, but some progs like adobe that use shared memory a swapfile at 128mb is good enough, the fastest hd and on this the first partition is the best place for swap memory. try and test, hth cu obe

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by vmaniks In reply to PC Performance

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by vmaniks In reply to PC Performance

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