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People & Technology Management

By Darren Moss, em3 pty ltd. ·
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Hello and Welcome...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Hello and thanks for stopping by to read my rants and extracts from the material I use when working with customers.<br />
<br />I'm part of the management team at em3 pty ltd, located in Melbourne Australia. Our organisation helps companies manage and grow their technical teams and individual talent.<br />
<br />Our goal is to:<br />1. Manage People and Infrastructure<br />2. Motivate and encourage to increase productivity<br />3. Mentor for growth of technical and management teams<br />
<br />Click by our website to find out more at <a href="http://www.em3.com.au">www.em3.com.au</a>
<br />There's free stuff you can read and apply today, including courseware extracts, mentor newsletters and presentation packs that you can customise for your own team.<br />
<br />Enjoy.<br />
<br />Darren Moss</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://darrenmoss.blogspot.com/2005/09/hello-and-welcome.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Do you subscribe to more of the same?

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">I'm writing this sitting interstate at the airport waiting for my return flight to Melbourne.<br />
<br />Taking a look around, all the shops have similar items for sale, yet people always seem to flock in and buy up the same stuff every day.<br />
<br />Toys, novelties, cheap stuff with a not so cheap price tag are selling like hotcakes.<br />
<br />Do you see similarities in your technology environment? Are there people in your organisation who come back everyday to buy the same stuff and as a result achieve the same outcome?<br />
<br />Sometimes even our most talented people get caught up buying the same theories and strategies everyday they come into the office.<br />
<br />Are you one of them? Perhaps you are someone who is always looking for a better way to do things.<br />
<br />Over the past 16 years I have noticed that sometimes those people who go against the grain (ie: don't buy into the same strategies expecting the outcome to be different) may just have the flair and drive that's needed to assist with influencing a change within the team.<br />
<br />Take a look around your workplace. Do you see people who could be a key part of making a change for the better?<br />
<br />They may not be change drivers, however they might just have enough spark to create a flame that organisational change agents can carry further.<br />
<br />Think outside the "normal process" to make a change. It's time to stop buying the same old stuff and become an agent of change for a better future.<br />
<br />Go well.<br />
<br />Darren Moss.<br />
<br />About the Author.<br />Darren Moss has more than 16 years experience in the information technology industry specialising in technology strategy, team development and operational management within corporate organisations.<br />
<br />Darren can be heard on talkback radio and is also available for presentations, workshops and engagements with your business and technical teams.<br />
<br />To comment on this article or to make contact with the author, please visit www.em3.com.au or telephone the office at em3 pty ltd people and technology management on +61 1300 131 083.</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://darrenmoss.blogspot.com/2005/09/do-you-subscribe-to-more-of-same.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Shape your own career, before someone else does

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">It's been a tough week for some of the staff in one of our customer organisations. There were redundancies, part of an overall rationalisation of roles across the company.<br />
<br />I happened to work closely on a number of initiatives with one senior member of our customer's organisation, when he was given some bad news about mid week. The team knew redundancies were on the cards for some players, probably outside of the information technology area, however they didn't expect a key senior person to be the next one out the door.<br />
<br />This guy was initially shattered, especially since he had given over 15 years of service across the organisation, mostly in information technology department. He was well liked and respected.<br />
<br />The whole experience highlights an important lesson about self development.<br />It doesn't matter if you are an information technology expert or a salesperson, maintaining your own career path and skills development is key to maintaining value in the marketplace.<br />
<br />Sometimes when people are made redundant it's because they are either no longer required due to a merger where someone else has better skills to do both jobs, or the organisation is taking another path for which you might not be deemed as suitable to take on in a role sense.<br />
<br />Luckily for my customer's staff member, he has great skills across a broad range of areas and will easily find another opportunity in the marketplace. That's the key point in this article.<br />
<br />How are your skills? Do you have a career plan?<br />Are you a technical support engineer working your way through the ranks onto a management position later?<br />
<br />Have you determined how long, what training, which types of companies to approach over your career to obtain the experience, skills and recognition required to move through the ranks?<br />
<br />Taking care of yourself is paramount and needs to happen before looking after your customer (or employer). You are in charge of your destiny, don't rely on anyone else to help develop or manage your skills and experience. This is your call. Get started. If you are already on a journey, put reminders in your calendar every 3 months to ensure you review progress.<br />
<br />"But it's Saturday, I don't need to do it right now". Come on, this is your career, your life. The sooner you get started the sooner you'll be reaching targets and enhancing your own employability.<br />
<br />Don't let someone else shape your career.<br />When you develop more skills this grows your experience and increased suitability for employment.<br />
<br />Growth opens the door to options you currently don't have. Growth enables networking with others who also open doors to opportunity - I'll talk more about this in future articles.<br />
<br />Aim high, set some goals for at least the next 12 months.<br />Your manager or team leader should be helping set at least some of your goals for the next year that are relevant to your current role.<br />
<br />Set targets with measurable output... "I will increase my management skills through reading correspondence A, B and C by the end of this quarter". Write it down. Put targets in your KRA/KPA/Performance plans so your manager can also track progress.<br />
<br />A good leader will help you set some goals.<br />A great leader will help you set goals, and look beyond your current role, even if this means leaving the team.<br />
<br />How long have you been doing the same job? Are you growing (your skills and experience)... or waiting for someone else to make the call on your next move.<br />
<br />Shape your own career, don't leave it to someone else.<br />
<br />Go well.<br />
<br />
<br />Darren Moss.<br />
<br />About the Author.<br />Darren Moss has more than 16 years experience in the information technology industry specialising in technology strategy, team development and operational management within corporate organisations.<br />
<br />Darren can be heard on talkback radio and is also available for presentations, workshops and engagements with your business and technical teams.<br />
<br />To comment on this article or to make contact with the author, please visit www.em3.com.au or telephone the office at em3 pty ltd people and technology management on +61 1300 131 083.</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://darrenmoss.blogspot.com/2005/10/shape-your-own-career-before-someone.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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Preparation smooths the interview...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">This week we've been interviewing technical candidates with one of our customers in Melbourne. We put together some behavioural competency questions and then asked our client to help pull together some technical questions relevant to the position. Then, we sit on the interview panel and assist with finding the right person for the role.<br />
<br />I was amazed with the number of candidates who were unprepared for some of the questions asked during the interview. Questions like strengths and weaknesses, and career goals for the next 12-18 months. There was silence and fidgeting when these questions were asked, then answers that were embarassing for me to write down on the candidate interview runsheet.<br />
<br />This particular customer is doing quite well in the Australian marketplace and is becoming more attractive to candidates who want to be part of something big utilising leading infrastructure and equipment. Even so, that's not a reason to go in head first without preparation!<br />
<br />When you take the time to map out answers to at least some of the questions you might be asked by a prospective employer, you will respond more confidently with credible answers and the interview will be much smoother.<br />
<br />In my opinion there are at least four parts to a technical candidate interview:<br />1. Behavioural competency questions (interviewer finds out about how you might respond in a situation)<br />2. Technical competency questions (interviewer finds out about your technical capability)<br />3. Your opportunity to ask questions<br />4. Final opportunity to sell yourself (this should also be performed throughout the interview).<br />
<br />Make sure you've planned for each of these types of question areas, then you can concentrate on selling yourself with relevance to the role... without worrying about what answers to figure out on the fly.<br />
<br />Have you made a list? Do you have a plan?<br />Write down some of the questions you would ask someone if you were interviewing them.<br />What is your plan to move through the ranks or positions to advance your career?<br />Is your next step a team leader, manager, department head or director? Write it down.<br />
<br />Whether you are a candidate or employer, we can help with questions, candidate interviews, goal setting, negotiation and induction into your existing team. Send us a note through the contact us page on our website at www.em3.com.au.<br />
<br />Good luck with the interview!<br />
<br />
<br />Darren Moss.<br />
<br />
<br />About the Author.<br />Darren Moss has more than 16 years experience in the information technology industry specialising in technology strategy, team development and operational management within corporate organisations.<br />
<br />Darren can be heard on talkback radio and is also available for presentations, workshops and engagements with your business and technical teams.<br />
<br />To comment on this article or to make contact with the author, please visit www.em3.com.au or telephone the office at em3 pty ltd people and technology management on +61 1300 131 083.</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://darrenmoss.blogspot.com/2005/10/preparation-smooths-interview.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

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