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Processor descriptions on Microsoft Windows

By Healer ·
I have been trying to google to get the generic information without any success for the equivalent plain language Microsoft Windows puts up on the System Information window.

On one of my laptops, it says "Processor x86 Family 6 Model 9 Stepping 5 GenuineIntel ~1498Mhz" I am not too sure what "Family 6", "Model 9" and "Stepping 5" stand for and what other classifications available?

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Here is a short description

by IC-IT In reply to Processor descriptions on ...

taken from this reference;
http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/25481.pdf

The processor Family identifies one or more processors as belonging to a group that possesses some common
definition for software or hardware purposes.
The Model specifies one instance of a processor family.
The Stepping identifies a particular version of a specific model. Therefore, Family, Model and Stepping, when
taken together, form a unique identification or signature for a processor.
The Family is an 8-bit value and is defined as: Family[7:0] = ({0000b,BaseFamily[3:0]} + ExtendedFamily[
7:0]). For example, if BaseFamily[3:0] = 0Fh and ExtendedFamily[7:0] = 01h, then Family[7:0] = 10h. If
BaseFamily[3:0] is less than 0Fh then ExtendedFamily[7:0] is reserved and Family is equal to BaseFamily[
3:0].
Model is an 8-bit value and is defined as: Model[7:0] = {ExtendedModel[3:0],BaseModel[3:0]}. For example,
if ExtendedModel[3:0] = 0Eh and BaseModel[3:0] = 08h, then Model[7:0] = E8h. If BaseFamily[3:0] is less
than 0Fh then ExtendedModel[3:0] is reserved and Model is equal to BaseModel[3:0].
Stepping is analogous to a revision number.

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It is still not very clear to me.

by Healer In reply to Here is a short descripti ...

Thank you for your explanation though it is still as clear as mud to me. I was hoping the terminology would directly correspond to something like pentium, celeron or duo core etc.

Perhaps Microsoft should explain that. It is better for them not to provide the information if the information is not clear and could be misleading and confusing.

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X86 Family

by pnoykalbo In reply to Processor descriptions on ...

Check (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/216204)

showing a list as follows:

Intel Celeron Intel, x86 Family 6 Model 5
Intel Celeron Intel, x86 Family 6 Model 6
Intel Mobile Pentium III Intel, x86 Family 6 Model 8
Intel Pentium II Intel, x86 Family 6 Model 3
Intel Pentium II Intel, x86 Family 6 Model 5
Intel Pentium II Intel, x86 Family 6 Model 6
Intel Pentium III Intel, x86 Family 6 Model 7
Intel Pentium Pro Intel, x86 Family 6 Model 1

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Microsoft is not helping

by Healer In reply to X86 Family

Microsoft should not provide information which is not helpful at all and could be misleading. What is the point of developing a program while one is expected to take into account of as many possible scenarios as they might happen. If they can't interpret the information then and there they should display even the raw data they pick up from the processor and ask people to refer to some web sites I suppose for further explanation.

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Why should they help?

by ThumbsUp2 In reply to Microsoft is not helping

Did you come here to BASH Microsoft, or did you come here for an answer to your question?

Why blame Microsoft? After all, the OS is simply reporting what the manufacturer built into the processor TO be reported. It's the manufacturer who determines what this processor is capable of and publishes that information from within the processor itself.

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Are you just wanting the plain name then?

by IC-IT In reply to Microsoft is not helping

GenuineIntel Intel(R) Celeron(R) M processor

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