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processors

By suleimein ·
what are the distinct differences between an intel celeron with a pentium M processors and which could be prefered to the other.

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by pierrejamme In reply to processors

If I remember correctly the Celeron does not have Math Co-Processor, runs cooler and costs less so is a good option for laptops where cooling is critical.
Your best bet is to visit www.intel.com for tons of info.
Here is a link for a comparison chart for the different types of mobile processors:
http://www.intel.com/support/processors/mobile/pm/sb/CS-007967.htm
Quote from same site:
"If Intel? Celeron? M processors and Intel? Centrino? mobile technology are both part of Intel's mobility family, what are the differences?
Intel? Centrino? mobile technology represents a combination of Intel's best mobile technologies (Intel? Pentium? M processor, Intel? 855 chipset family or Intel 915 chipset family, and Intel? PRO/Wireless 2100, 2200BG, or 2915ABG network connection) delivering all four vectors of mobility: performance, integrated wireless, enables great battery life, enables thinner/lighter form factors.
The Intel? Celeron? M brand represents only the Intel? Celeron? M processor. Designed for mobility, the Intel? Celeron? M processor delivers exceptional value with a balance of mobile processor technology enabling thinner and lighter systems.
How is the Intel? Celeron? M processor different from the Intel? Pentium? M processor?
The Intel? Pentium? M processor is designed, tested and tuned for mobility, including breakthrough mobile performance, enabling great battery life, enabling sleeker, lighter laptop designs.
The Intel? Celeron? M processor delivers a balanced level of mobile processor technologies mobile performance, lower voltage enables sleeker, lighter laptop designs at an exceptional value. "

Good Luck
Peter

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by HAL 9000 Moderator In reply to processors

What Peter also forgot to mention is that the Intel Centerno M also cuts back on speed when not in use so it helps to extend Battery Life by sucking less power by the CPU and colling solutions.

The Celeron which is never mentioned at Intel Chanel Partners Meetings doesn't have this ability and while it now carries some L2 Cache it doesn't have anywhere near as much as the M version so it is much slower and also consumes the battery faster.

If you want sheer processing power and longer battery life the M version is the only way to go the Celeron is only produced to compete with the AMD and really isn't of much use in a professional Notebook but may prove fine for a domestic version of the same thing.

Col

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by suleimein In reply to processors

It is pretty obvious that the Intel Celeron M is designed for average performance at low cost. What i would recommeded to Designers (Processors) to carry out a feasibility study of the Tropics (West Africa) and design processors, system boards that can will withstand the erractic voltage supply. These parts constitute 60% of the consumers in terms of Intel Products.

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by suleimein In reply to processors

It is pretty obvious that the Intel Celeron M is designed for average performance at low cost. What i would recommeded to Designers (Processors) to carry out a feasibility study of the Tropics (West Africa) and design processors, system boards that can & will withstand the erractic voltage supply. These parts constitute 60% of the consumers in terms of Intel Products.

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by denodave In reply to processors

It seems to me the real issue here is the power supply. This individual has described "erratic voltage" as an issue. Answering the processor question in my mind is easy: The original Celerons are cheaper and in my experience have *mostly* withstood a lot of abuse. The design of newer processors assumes newer circuitry and associated hardware. My experience is that the newer the hardware, the less durable it is. We are discussing a "developing region" here, so it seems logical to look for durability. Actually I would recommend PentiumII or pentiumIII (Slot1) processors for this scenario, provided the cpu speed is not too much of an issue. They are easily and cheaply found on the internet, but the mainboards are becoming a little scarce.

NOW MY MAIN THOUGHT -- you should be focusing on quality power supplies (psu) and mainboard durability rather than the cpu design. The psu is what does the power conditioning, and the mainboard quality has a great deal to do with whether the machine will withstand power fluctuations over an extended period.

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