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proxy server

By rodger ·
Probably basic question but Im getting ready to setup Proxy server 2.0 on home network to practice for test. I have a external DSL 675 cisco router configured in ppp mode. I have a nt 4.0 box with 2 nics using bogus 10.0.0.x ip addresses. I have aquired 5 ip addresses from my isp. Now for the quesion do I need to assign real static ip addresses to both of the nics and router? Should I configure router in bridging mode?

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by lylea42 In reply to proxy server

you really only need one Static IP for your proxy server which is connecting to the internet and make sure your router is set for bridging mode. Depending on the number of workstations you have set up in your domain you are better off using 192.168.0.X for your local intranet. They will be connecting to the internet through your proxy server so they do not require a legitimate IP address, although it is fun trying to get everything to work.

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by rodger In reply to proxy server

My friend is using linux and he has always used bridging mode. The documentation that came with static ip stated must use ppp mode

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by curlergirl In reply to proxy server

You need one static IP for your router and one for one of the NICs in your server. The other NIC in your server retains its 10.0.0.x IP and the server acts as a bridge between the external and internal IP network. The NIC with the external IP bridges to your router and the outside world. You can use a crossover cable or straight through depending upon whether your router has a hub or not. Hope this helps!

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by rodger In reply to proxy server
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by McKayTech In reply to proxy server

The NIC going to your DSL router will need to be set with one of the IP addresses leased from your ISP - theoretically, you could actually bind more than one to that NIC if you wanted but these must be real IP addresses.

The other NIC could be any addresses you wanted but in the interests of protecting the Internet against configuration errors, you should choose addresses in one of the private IP address ranges.

I don't have enough experience with the Cisco 675 to speak with authority, but it seems to me it should not be in bridging mode.

paul

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by rodger In reply to proxy server
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by stemarie In reply to proxy server

The NIC connected on the Router side needs a public IP (one of the 5), the other needs a private ip (one of the 10.0.0.0).

The Router does NOT need tampering with, if it works now, then it will continue to work.

The router should not operate in bridging mode since this re-transmits broadcasts, you don't want this unless you have another subnet on the other side that needs to be aware of broadcasts. (Like an NT domain controler)

My advice: Don't touch the router and get a big book on microsoft proxy, especially if you plan to use the IIS service in-house for intranet publishing. If you don't get proper documentation, you're gonna cry, I guaranty it.

Why ?

Well Microsoft proxy installs a new winsock.dll on all client machines,they make a DCOM call on the proxy machine which then decides were the network call goes.

The proxy has to know what's inside and what's not, and you can't (unless you jump through flamming hoops backwards, blindfolded) host virtual websites on the private side on th

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by rodger In reply to proxy server

best answer really apprciate help. I agree keeping router in ppp mode isp's documentation states must be in ppp mode. Not all isp's will allow you to use bridging

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