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Real Power= Power v. Power

By ffarjad.farid@checknetwor ·
An old wise adage goes something like this “Necessity is the mother of invention”.

As the cost of energy continues to rise exponentially shouldn’t the purchasing decisions of the computer industry be based on the balance between
the CPU power v. overall power consumption of the workstation/severs.
Rather than the traditional view of CPU power.

The other compelling reason for this is the growing need for greater participation of 700+M Africans in the global economical activities. As they grow their energy requirement is likely to further increase base cost for the whole of humanity. This is not to say we can justify allowing African continent to remain tarred by and trapped in poverty. I believe humanity has passed such point. Plus their active participation will benefit everyone in other ways.

Hence there is a need for innovative yet practical solutions from every sector of society. Including the computer industry.

One such solution would be to substantially reduce the *over all* power consumption of every workstation without significantly hitting the raw CPU power. Of course servers require more raw CPU power. Nevertheless even their power consumption could be reduced. By substantial I mean 70+% relative to current usage.

For example motherboards could be designed to shut down every major region (chips/parts) that are not used. For example many machines have 1G memory installed on them but do you use it all.
Others have hard disks and IDE controllers which are constantly drawing some power. Why not completely isolate such parts until they are needed.

Finally why not have PSUs which can draw some of their power from solar panels which could be part of the casing.

The question is what do you think?

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