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Remote login & NAT???

By mdl3 ·
The company I work for has a small network, we are allowed 5 IPs, the network address is suneted to acomodate 7 addresses per subnet, only 5 available for hosts (255.255.255.248), now we have 7 workstations that need access to the network, the solution for that is NAT correct?
we want to be able to login remotely with PC anywhere software, but how do i get around NAT to access certain PC's on the network???
What is right "most efective way" to do remote loging to certain workstations in my company network????
Thanks !
Marlon D.

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Remote login & NAT???

by Ann777 In reply to Remote login & NAT???

If you have NAT going, the only way to access the other computers is to run PCAnywhere on each and have them wait as host.

You PCAnywhere into the NATted IP address, then from there you PCAnywhere into the second ip address. In other words, from the NATted computer you run PCAnywhere as host (yes, within the first), and connect to one of the other "remotes" setup on the machine with NAT.

Unfortunately, it's slow and clunky (you have a second PCanywhere screen within the first -- which limits the screen size and manipulations using scrollbars are difficult until you get used to it), but it does work and is a way around NAT.

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Remote login & NAT???

by mdl3 In reply to Remote login & NAT???

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Remote login & NAT???

by DEREKHYPS In reply to Remote login & NAT???

First of all, most companies with 5 or more pc's usually use NAT or PAT. If the internal pc's need access to the Internet than you need a device to convert ethernet to T1 or DSL or ISDN. The Cisco 1700 router will run NAT and convert to T1. Another device that is used to conect ethernet to the internet is a CSU/DSU or cable modem. If your converter does not have IP filtering capabilities (firewall) you should buy an firewall appliance like a Sonicwall SOHO box) It can run NAT and protect your network. With NAT you now can connect hundreds of PC's using private addresses. That is, if your using NAT and want to connect to the internet your need to change all your pc's IP addresses to 10.x.x.x or 172.16.xx~172.31.255.255 or 192.168.x.x. Now to access your Network from home you could buy a LanRover box and dial in using a regular phone line. The Lanrover, if DHCP is set up, will automatically give you an Private address from a poll of addresses you setup that is in the range of all your other PC's at work. now you login and its like sitting at work. run your pcanywhere using an IP address and your screaming. Good luck.

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Remote login & NAT???

by DEREKHYPS In reply to Remote login & NAT???

If you buy a Sonicwall appliance you could buy Sonicwalls client VPN software so you can connect to company network over your broadband connection at home. If you have people what work on road, they may need dial up and the lanrover would work for them. Also, if you have a Neware 4.11 server and want to connect using IPX either you'll need to use the Lanrover. some firewall boxes and NAT can't handle IPX. Another trick is to set up a NT box with a Gateway to the IPX network and log in that way to access your Novell IPX box.

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Remote login & NAT???

by curlergirl In reply to Remote login & NAT???

derekhyps answer is pretty complete, but here are a few alternatives and specifics - Get an inexpensive combination router/firewall from Linksys or Netgear - these include NAT and the ability to forward incoming packets by port number to certain internal IP addresses. This is important for pcAnywhere and also if you have an internal email or web server of any kind. Your DSL or cable modem will connect directly to the Linksys router through a special port, and then you connect the router to the rest of your network by either uplinking it to your internal hub or switch, or by using the hub built into the router (some have only 4 ports so you need to be sure you get one with at least 8 ports if you're going to do that). Assuming you have a full-time Internet connection (DSL/Cable/T1), you can use pcAnywhere directly over the Internet. Set up your router to forward incoming packets to your PC(s) that are running pcAnywhere and waiting as a host(s). You need to configure the router, the pcAnywhere host software on the internal PC and the pcAnywhere remote software on the remote PC to use the same ports. If you want to connect to only one PC from outside, then you can use the default ports of 5631 and 5632. Then, from there, you can connect to other internal PCs as suggested by Anna, but you will have you learn how to negotiate the double-window effect (we do it all the time). However, if you need or want to connect to more than one PC from different remote PCs simultaneously, you have to manually configure additional ports in the pcAnywhere software. Here's an example:

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Remote login & NAT???

by curlergirl In reply to Remote login & NAT???

PC configuration:

PC1 - uses ports 5631 and 5632 - IP 192.168.1.2
PC2 - uses ports 5633 and 5634 - IP 192.186.1.3
PC3 - uses ports 5635 and 5636 - IP 192.168.1.4
(etc. . .)

Router - external IP (example) 204.60.0.3
- internal IP 192.168.1.1

forwarding set as following:

ports 5631 and 5632 to 192.168.1.2
ports 5633 and 5634 to 192.168.1.3
ports 5635 and 5636 to 192.168.1.4
(etc. . . .)

Remote PCs need to be set to use the specific ports also, in the pcAnywhere software.

If you need add'l help, email me at synergy@synoffsys.com.

Hope this helps!

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