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routers Memory

By dsarneja ·
I have seen that routers have DRAM & Flash
So what r benifits of 16MB DRAM & 8MB Flash over 2 MB DRAM & 4 MB Flash

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routers Memory

by Michael Roark - CCNA/DA MCP 3CSA In reply to routers Memory

Some IOS's, (the mini kernel Operating System of the router) require more memory to run in than their older versions, so if you are updating the software of a Cisco, (or other company's) router, make sure that you have the memory required, Routers don't have hard drives for swap space like PC's...
for more info on routers, check out some whitepapers at CCO, www.cisco.com

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routers Memory

by dsarneja In reply to routers Memory

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by McKayTech In reply to routers Memory

The Flash memory is used to store the operating system image so if you upgrade the OS to add features or functionality, you may need the Flash upgrade so the image will fit.

The DRAM is used to temporarily store operating information such as routing tables or logs. So, for example, if you're using a router on your Internet interface and are implementing BGP, you may need to upgrade the DRAM to provide enough space for the rather large routing tables that will result.

paul

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routers Memory

by dsarneja In reply to routers Memory

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by Kevin Anderson In reply to routers Memory

Flash RAM will be for the router Operating System.

DRAM has 2 uses. One matters, the other doesn't. DRAM will hold routing tables, adn stuff. All switches and routers will have enough RAM to do this adequately. The other reason for DRAM (the one you'll notice) is basically for storing packets. For example. We have a setup where a 10/100 switch connects to 24 clients at 10 Meg, but to the server at 100 Meg. When a client makes a request to the server, the server will respond faster than the client can recieve. The DRAM will hold the excess data until it can be 'fed' to the client. Additional DRAM simply allows more packets to be queued up rather then dropped. When they are dropped, they need to be re-requested, slowing down theprocess. This could be even worse if 24 clients made requests to the server at the same time. With 24 ports all running 100 Megs at the server, and it only able to accept 100 at a time, there would again be a delay. So the router stores the requests, and forward them as soon as it can. Same as the first example, but in reverse.

In short. Additional DRAM will make a busy router/switch seem faster. Flash RAM means nothing, except maybe upgradeability, though not usually.

Kev.

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routers Memory

by dsarneja In reply to routers Memory

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by dsarneja In reply to routers Memory

This question was auto closed due to inactivity

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