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routers vs switches

By sparklyscotty ·
Hi there!
I have a small network of 6 computers (all on a mixture of Windows OS) these are on an ethernet, and access the web through a LAN.
Our ADSL router is playing up, and I need to purchase a new one. However, I am wondering if the problem might also lie in the Switch? The connection to the internet goes down and the router freezes usually when our internet traffic is high. If I try to transfer a large file over the internet the router will almost predictably freeze.
I currently have ann MRI 8port 10/100 MBps Switch, and a DLink ADSL Router.
How can I tell if the Switch is doing it's job properly?
If anyone can help me in this area, I will be really greatful.
Thanks.
-Angel-

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Here you go

by jbaker In reply to routers vs switches

Routers:

A device that forwards data packets along networks. A router is connected to at least two networks, commonly two LANs or WANs or a LAN and its ISP?s network. Routers are located at gateways, the places where two or more networks connect.
Routers use headers and forwarding tables to determine the best path for forwarding the packets, and they use protocols such as ICMP to communicate with each other and configure the best route between any two hosts.

Very little filtering of data is done through routers.


Switch:
(1) In networks, a device that filters and forwards packets between LAN segments. Switches operate at the data link layer (layer 2) and sometimes the network layer (layer 3) of the OSI Reference Model and therefore support any packet protocol. LANs that use switches to join segments are called switched LANs or, in the case of Ethernet networks, switched Ethernet LANs.


As opposed to,

Hub:
A common connection point for devices in a network. Hubs are commonly used to connect segments of a LAN. A hub contains multiple ports. When a packet arrives at one port, it is copied to the other ports so that all segments of the LAN can see all packets.
A passive hub serves simply as a conduit for the data, enabling it to go from one device (or segment) to another. So-called intelligent hubs include additional features that enables an administrator to monitor the traffic passing through the hub and to configure each port in the hub. Intelligent hubs are also called manageable hubs.

A third type of hub, called a switching hub, actually reads the destination address of each packet and then forwards the packet to the correct port.
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addendum

by jbaker In reply to Here you go

All of the information in my previous quote comes from www.webopedia.com.

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Posted in error

by CfK In reply to routers vs switches

Ignore this post

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Test and test again

by CfK In reply to routers vs switches

A simple test - if your router goes down does this stop your whole network from functioning or can you still continue to share files and print locally (I am assuming you do these things)?
It this is true there is nothing wrog with your switch as it is functioning still and is probably unaffected by the router vagaries.

If your ADSL Router "goes down" does this mean the link has been dropped and the ADSL has not automatically reconnected, or has the ADSL router completely stopped and locked up? Are you able, when it is "down", to telnet to the Router from your internal PC at all?

What I am trying to establish is exactly what is affected rather by a systematic breakdown of component parts. Look at it this way:
1. Internal network depends on the switch. If the internal still works the problem is probably elsewhere.
2. Internet connection depends on the ADSL Router, the link to the ISP, and the ISP.
a. The link to the router needs to be checked on the switch to see if it stays up, then check the router is contactable from the internal network via ping, telnet.
b. Then check the link to the ISP is up and how often it goes down.
c. Lastly check the ISP that they do not have a capping on volume, traffic limits, or time limits on the link you have.
The problem you describe is most likely to be one of the latter two categories.

Let me know how you get on.

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Ok..next step

by sparklyscotty In reply to Test and test again

Thanks guys. I think I have the concept of switches/ routers down now. The internal network is running, if a bit sluggish at times. I have installed Ping software and am ready to test the router now. I know the IP addresses of each workstation, but how do I find out the IP addresses of the Switch and/ or router?

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Ok..next step

by sparklyscotty In reply to Test and test again

Thanks guys. I think I have the concept of switches/ routers down now. The internal network is running, if a bit sluggish at times. I have installed Ping software and am ready to test the router now. I know the IP addresses of each workstation, but how do I find out the IP addresses of the Switch and/ or router?

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by DeN inc. In reply to routers vs switches

there shouldn't be a problem with the switch. you should look into other matters such as Ip conflicts, cables etc. Do you have another modem connecting to the switch??

my advice to you is to check all of these things first, then go get a new router.

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Router is the problem

by adc24 In reply to

I agree with Dennis your problem has to be in the router.

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by sparklyscotty In reply to Router is the problem

I have upped my broadband limit, which might solve the problem, but would still like to work out how to ping my router to make sure that it is functioning properly. If someone can tell me how to find the IP address to ping, that would really help me out. Cheers!
-Angel-

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Finding the router's IP

by Jdelawder In reply to

Finding the router's IP is actually very easy. Click "Start" --> "Run" and in the text box type "cmd" to get to the command line. After getting to the command line, type "ipconfig" or "ipconfig -all" and the IP of the router will be the "Default Gateway" value.

In addition, you should be able to log into your router by typing "http://<ipaddress> into a browser, which should then prompt you for a password. Consult your owner's manual for the default login credentials.

Logging into your router will usually give you options to release and renew your IP address if your connection goes down, which usually solves most connection problems. Also, if you have never changed the default settings of your router and are comfortable with doing so, you should change the default settings, which can also be done by logging into the router. Keeping default values can be a security threat.

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