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Running out of Ip addresses

By lhatcher ·
Our current network setup is one single subnet, with a class c subnet range 192.168.1.0/24. We have a second building that we have ran cat 5 cable to, this second building. We are running out of ip addresses, and would like to make this second building use 192.168.2.0 ip range. We dont want to change our current ip range or subnet mask if at all possible. What equipment, etc, will we need to accomplish this?

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by ccthompson In reply to Running out of Ip address ...

Setup Vlans within your router... Although i dont know what equipment you currently have, if it is Cisco, you should be set, depending on the model.

Please post your current equipment.

Another Route would be to setup another Internet Connection to the second building, and use two Linksys VPN routers, i used these for a few years, they work very good.

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by curlergirl In reply to Running out of Ip address ...

If your buildings are close enough together to have cat5 cable running between them, then all you have to do is have a router on each end. Router A on the 192.168.1.0 subnet would need to have a static route to Router B, which would be on the 192.168.2.0 subnet, and vice versa. Or, if you have only one Internet connection, assuming it is on Router A, then on Router B, all you would need is a single IP Address in the 192.168.1.0 subnet assigned to Router B as the "WAN" address and used as the default gateway for all packets not on the 192.168.2.0 subnet.

Hope this helps!

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by CG IT In reply to Running out of Ip address ...

the real question is how many workstations/devices like printers are there and how many does the company plan on having in the future? you get 254 addresses from a Class C with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 [24 bit network, 8 bits for hosts].

if your running out of addresses [approaching 254 workstations/printers/devices] might consider a Class B ip scheme. there's 65,000 odd host addresses available for Class B 16 bits for network 16 bits for host [ (256*256)= 65,534 ]

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by Junkmail1979 In reply to Running out of Ip address ...

Just let you know I am still getting my education on Network Specialist, But from my understanding is that you are behind a NAT Usint a Class C Private Network Range 192.168.x.x

Question are you trying to keep them all on the same network ID? if so you will need to give yourself a private class B or even Class A ip address and subnetting since you are behind a NAT you can keep your What ever Class IP you have registered to you and work behind the nat for your own private ip.

If you dont need them to be all on the same Network IP range you can always do a VLAN if your switch has the capabilities to do so

Another Suggestion is how often are all the users logged onto the computer, if you dont have all 254 users on at one time then you can set up a DHCP service which then you shouldnt have to worry about running out of IP for your current clients, but then you also need to keep in mind that you need to leave room for the company to Expand which means you need to keep Reserved IP ranges.

I personally would just have to tough it out and redo the IP Range and go for a Class B Private Network or a Class A private network

Class A Private IP range
10.0.0.0-10.255.255.255 /8

Class B Private IP range
172.16.0.0 ? 172.31.255.255 /12

Remember I am still new and correct me if I am wrong in some parts or even add on to what I have said.

These are just some of my suggestions

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by NOW LEFT TR In reply to Running out of Ip address ...

You can use a 2K3 server as a router if needed. Routing and Remote Access. One at each site would split the network. Mind you rebooting said server(s) would kill the WAN connections...

Better with a Layer 3 switch at the heart and layer two switches at each end of the LAN. If it is all cabled you can create VLAN's on the layer three (+ routes) and use the layer two as the connection points.

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