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server behind router

By Fred100 ·
Hi all; I have been assigned 2 public/static ips from my isp. One I have put on my little linksys 4 port cable/dsl router (model befsr41), so the router has the ip, the subnet mask, gateway, and dns info that my internal network all look at. I have a small server (non-windows) that I have put the other ip and all associated info onto. But I cannot see this small server and its dedicated ip....cant ping it, cant see it with the client software.

The cablemodem is plugged into the router, the router into a linksys 8 port switch as well as this server I am trying to connect to. The rest of the internal lan is on a hub which is connected to the switch.

What am I missing that I cannot see the second ip from the outside world--I think it may be something simple. A linksys support person told be I had to get a different router to support NAT tranvergence or something like that???

Fred100

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by CG IT In reply to server behind router

humm the routers firewall might be set to block WAN ping as WAN ping is a form of attack.

Need clarification. Do you have 2 seperate inbound DSL lines from your ISP? if so, do you have 2 seperate modems for the DSL lines? if so is one connected to a router and the other connected directly to the modem?

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by CG IT In reply to

consumer leve DSL lines come in over POTS. To have 2 DSL lines, you have to have 2 POTS lines which would require 2 DSL modems. What all that means is that you have 2 networks. to ping one network from another you need the public IP address of the network you want to ping AND that network can't block WAN ICMP requests. Remember typically with consumer level routers, your LAN is a private non routable IP addressing scheme so if you use the addresses behind to router in which to ping, ICMP requests will fail as the address is not routable.

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by Fred100 In reply to

Poster rated this answer.

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by Fred100 In reply to server behind router

I do not have 2 dsl lines---only one and I have a consumer type router. I think I threw the question off by talking about the "pinging of the second ip".

This is a typical kind of small business set up with one dsl line, 1 modem, 1 router and now a server with a public ip address.

So in all this, do I require a different router???

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by CG IT In reply to server behind router

humm well if you have 1 domain name for the small business you can dump the second DSL line and use the $$ they charge you for the second public IP to increase the bandwidth on the first line for the web server. Map port 80 via port fowarding to the web server. Then have DNS resolve the domain name to the single ISP assigned IP address. All inbound port 80 requests will be fowarded to the web server. For the other computers on the LAN behind the router, just connect em up to one of the switch ports [no port mapping]. If there are other servers on the network that provide other services like SMTP mail, just map port 25 to the machine that provides mail service.

Note: all LAN machines providing services such as web, email, DNS, require a static IP address and since they are behind the router use a non routable private IP scheme [most use a Class C private].

Don't need a different router to provide public services. Just need to map public services to the LAN server that provides it.

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by CG IT In reply to

note: typically phone company ISPs with DSL service won't give you a pool [more than 1] of IP addresses for 1 consumer level DSL line over POTS.

If you have a pool, your consumer level router [Linksys] as an setup area for you to enter static IP, subnet mask and DNS information. If not, yes you'll have to get a different router. Which one is a good question. A consumer level router isn't going to cut it.

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by howie.erickson In reply to server behind router

Ok,
Lets review. You have the cable modem plugged into the router. Coming off the router, you have an 8 port switch (with the server and static IP) and a hub connected to it with workstations DHCP (from router) assigned addresses (probably 192.168.X.X) . This puts both sets of addresses on the same subnet. Here is what I would suggest. Plug the 8 port switch into the cable modem. then attach the server and the router to it. plug the hub into the router. This will put the addrresses on different subnets. This does put the server outside the firewall. Install a SW firewall on the server, or purchase a different HW firewall.

Hope this helps!
Howie

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by Fred100 In reply to

Great Howie, thats exactly the type of suggestion I was lookign for...many thanks

Fred100

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by Fred100 In reply to server behind router

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