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server splitting

By glenn_billie_jo ·
I would appreciate any input on how to put together ashared use server, running 2 keyboards, mouses, and monitors. I know it can be done using a KVM splitter, but this is for my home office, and funds are tight, (lol) business xp platform. thanks for any help you can provide

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very confused

by LordInfidel In reply to server splitting

why would you want to "share" a system in that manner? Only 1 person can use the system at any given time (ie. have control of the mouse and keyboard)

<this excludes the radmin and pcanywhere style acess>

I'm just not seeing the point to this. It's one thing to have 1 monitor/keyboard/mouse controlling mutiple systems. But not the reverse.

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I'm with you here LordInfidel

by HAL 9000 Moderator In reply to very confused

I don't understand it either. What would be the point of having two of everything for one box?

Sure you could use splitter leads to be on the cheap but I can't for the life of me understand what you would hope to achieve particuarly on a Server.

Perhaps he has got it mixed up and is trying to say what you suggested using a couple of computers with one keyboard, mouse, monitor combination but even with the remote Desktop that is available in XP only one person at a time can use the computer. The same applies to any of the programs that you listed as well but he did say Server didn't he?

I don't know about how things are done where he is but here servers are mostly left to their own devices and left to do their own thing whatever that may be from a gateway to data storage unit.

I can understand the need in not wanting any of these things on a server but having two of then is just beyond me. Perhaps we both should ask for some clarifaction here.

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There IS a point!

by GuruOfDos In reply to very confused

And there was a company that did just this!

One PC, two graphics cards, two monitors, two keyboards, two rodents (with a tiny 'dongle' for splitting them)...and a small piece of software that 'timeshared' the computer between two 'virtual' copies of Windows. Running on a 350MHz PC, this gave two users the opportunity to use two 'Virtual P120s' (there is obviously some overhead in the splitting software).

It was designed as a multi-user system for use in schools, colleges etc where funds were limited but more than one PC was needed (for simple jobs like web-browsing, word-processing, etc). Obviously, you wouldn't want to use it for games!

I understand that it was expandable to five users, subject to enough PCI slots for the additional graphics cards. Mind you they did say in their advertising 'blurb' that 6 virtual PCs on a 350MHz system would be the equivalent of running 486DX2-66 machines. More than adequate to run Office or IE, but not very quickly! I think at the time, a decent 350MHz PC cost about ?900 (US$1500) and the splitter software and hardware was ?200 (US$330) per 'channel', plus the cost of keyboard, rat and monitor. Of course, and CD drive, scanner or printer would be 'shared', like on a p2p network.

I forget the name of the company, but I think I still have a PC magazine from 1999 floating around with the advert in it and an editorial on the system....I shall try and unearth it!

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Here is a link

by GuruOfDos In reply to There IS a point!

Not the original one I remember, but a similar system, circa 2001.

http://tinyurl.com/qo42

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Well that's stupid....

by LordInfidel In reply to There IS a point!

That is what stuff like Terminal Services was made for.

Obviously with linux this is built in ie (multiuser).

Why build something so convulted that degrades system resources when you can use something that was explicitly designed for that scenario.

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Well you learn something new every day

by HAL 9000 Moderator In reply to There IS a point!

But what is the point of this?

The original poster said he wanted to split a Server not a Workstation/Home Computer so why would anyone ever consider something as silly as this?

I can understand it for schools long ago when this stuff was just too expensive but nowdays there is no point and a lot to be said against it as well. Also was I reading that right that two installations of an OS and software where required? If that was correct then I can understand M$ pushing the idea after all they would be selling several copies of thier software for one box but it is hardly a fesable alternative to a proper setup school solution. Even the old Wang units that relied totally on the server for all processing and only had dumd workstations made far more sence than this idea.

I'm still with L.I. here I still don't see the point and a lot of issues that make it undesirable as well.

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Ok...WAS a point rather than IS a point

by GuruOfDos In reply to Well you learn something ...

Back in the days when monitors cost $150 plus and computers were ten times that.

Many educational establishments had a mix of older computers and newer ones. Old crusty 386 and 486 machines couldn't be upgraded too far but recycling an old 486's monitor, keyboard and mouse and only paying $200 for the software and interface made sense back then. Not today maybe when a diskless workstation costs less than $100 for the hardware!

It was often more cost effective to take say twenty older 486's and scrap the system units keeping the monitors, keyboards and mice, and buying ten 350Mhz system units (costing say $800 each) plus 10x $200 for this system (one per two monitors....you get the picture) for a total of $10k than it was to go out and buy 20x 233MHz pc's at say $700 a throw (for a total of 14k, saving 4k).

Don't ask me why, but there are at least four local schools I know that did actually use such systems until very recently!

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Don't get me wrong G.O.D.

by HAL 9000 Moderator In reply to Ok...WAS a point rather t ...

I wasn't dsaying that there was no point rather why on a server? As the original poster asked. I can understand just why it would be a good idea to have done these things a long time ago and even if the hardware was continued to be used could still be around even now.

But why would anyone want to do this now? Particuarly on a Server?

That's what lost me with the original question nothing else. Actually talking about old hardware I've got a Stallion network system here that runs through the com ports and has the amasing processor speed of 100 Meg H. It was ideal for the 486 days but totally useles nowdays and it is still new and other than me taking it out of the box ocasionally never been fitted to a computer. It consists of a 16 Bit ISA card with two 50 way ribon cables that go into a black box with 15 Sub D15 connectors. It would have been interesting in its day but nothing more than a novelity now days. I get a kick out of telling one of the junior staff who is showing off to set up the network for some client and then hand then this thing. It is good for seeing how they get along and just how long they remain so smug about all that they don't know.
I've even had a few try to fit it to a server but as I use Tyan M'Boards for this purpose they just don't have ISA slots so it is interesting watching them try to fit it and just reading the books that come with it. Well it amuses me anyway but then I'm easly amused and I have removed the 5.25" floppies so there are only the 3.5" floppies so they still think that it is some form of current device.

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