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Setting up point to point T! connection

By chrisk ·
We have just leased a full T1 line for a point to point connection. We are trying to have the two networks talk to eachother through 2 netopia pn660 routers and have encoutered a whole mess of problems. What do i need to do to get the two networksto talk to eachother.

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Hate to tell you this

by LordInfidel In reply to Setting up point to point ...

If you are not sure about routing and have not done this before.

My advice would be to contact your ISP and see about hiring a engineer.

They won't be cheap. CCIE's generally get on avg $200/hr. So make sure that you know what you want to dobefore hand.

Unfortanetly there is just 2 much information that would need to be covered to get your 2 networks up and running.

Sorry for the bad news. But it sounds like it's time to call in an engineer.

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Basically...

by eBob In reply to Setting up point to point ...

Your PTT can verify that you have connectivity between the CSU/DSUs at each site (or at least between the demark points if they did not also supply the datasets).

Having established that, and assuming that you're running TCP/IP, and that routing is appropriate between sites (as compared with bridging - yuk) you need:

- a subnet for each site
- a small subnet for the serial line
- a router at each site

Plug the router into the dataset at each site, and with a console in the console port of the router, power the routers up.

You should be able to enter a comand to display the interfaces ("sh int" in Cisco) at the command prompt, and somewhere in the results should be an indication that it has found the Serial port ("S0" or "Serial 0") and that it is "up".

Great.

Contact the vendor to see if they have a config wizard, or sample config files, then setup a config file, applying the appropriate subnet masks and addresses. Remember, the serial ports need to be on the same subnet as each other, but have different addresses, and the need to be on different subnets than the LANs at each site. Remember also that each LAN should have its own subnet, and the Ethernet ports on the routers should be addresses from the range for each subnet. And make sure to exclude these addresses from your DHCP scopes.

E.G.,

LAN "A":
Network: 192.168.80.0
Router Ethernet: 192.168.80.1
Available addresses: 192.168.80.2 thru 192.168.80.14
Broadcast: 192.168.80.15
- subnet mask: 255.255.255.240

LAN "A":
Network: 192.168.80.16
Router Ethernet: 192.168.80.17
Available addresses: 192.168.80.18 thru 192.168.80.30
Broadcast: 192.168.80.31
- subnet mask: 255.255.255.240

Serial Connection:
Network: 192.168.80.252
Serial at LAN "A": 192.168.80.253
Serial at LAN "B": 192.168.80.254
Broadcast: 192.168.80.255

Hope that helps.

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Correction...

by eBob In reply to Basically...

LAN "A" and LAN "B", not both "LAN `A`"

(of course...)

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