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SHARING

By adcdesk ·
I noticed that an exeucutive user on the network was sharing her c drive. When I questioned her about it, she didn't know that her c drive was shared. When I right clicked on her c drive to select the not sharing button, I received a message saying that someone was connected to her c drive at that moment and selecting the do not share will diconnect them. Is there a way I can tell who is connected to her c: drive? I know there are utilities out there that will let you know who is trying to or getting into your network.

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by tamj123 In reply to SHARING

goto Control panel click on server, it will tell you who is connected to her shared drive and what files is open and how long it has been open, etc.

hope this will help

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by tamj123 In reply to SHARING

Sorry, above answer is for Windows NT only,

for you question, goto website www.adkins-resource.com and download software call "Hyena" it should solved you problem.

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SHARING

by adcdesk In reply to SHARING

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by jsarinana In reply to SHARING

Go to Start button, Settings, Control Panel, Server and select the In use button

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by adcdesk In reply to SHARING

I neglected to tell you that the user is using Windows 98. Thanks for replying.

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by mmcdade In reply to SHARING

There's a Windows-native utility called "NetWatcher" that should answer your question. Assuming you're running WIN98, goto Start>Programs>Accessories>System Tools and select "NetWatcher". That will show you who on the network is connected to the share. You can also manually disconnect them using the utility without having to shut-down the PC.

If "NetWatcher" isn't listed, you'll need to add that component via your WIN98 CD (Add/Remove Windows Components).

NOTE: You should also probe further into the reason why an "executive user" (or any user) has their C: drive shared out (one, I'm assuming by your post that the entire C drive is shared out, and not just a folder; and two, that the share isn't password protected). There is no legitimate reason I can think of to have an entire C drive shared out, notwithstanding the fact that the share isn't password protected.

You should definitely let your user know the security risks (include virus spreads) involved. Since the user didn't even know the drive was shared, she probably also doesn't know the implications of doing so.

Hope that helps!

- Mark

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SHARING

by adcdesk In reply to SHARING

Thanks a lot Mark, I will use your suggestion. This person is using Windows 98. She suspect fowl play. They have very sensitive data on their computer and yes it was the entire c: drive that was shared and was not password protected!

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by mmcdade In reply to SHARING

Glad I could be of help! Can you switch the answer to "Accepted" and give me the points? Sounds trivial, I know, but if you could indulge me...

About the "foul play" suspicion -- that's bad (but, unfortunately, it happens).

Another point -- if the data on her C: drive *is* very sensitive, she shouldn't be storing it on her C drive, anyway. If her Hard Drive crashes, and you can't retrieve the data, well then...you get the point. At *least* have her back-up that data on a regular basiseither via the network or to another storage device, and put it in a secure location. Regardless of the "share violation", since the data resides on her local drive, anybody can get to it anyway, even if you invoke BIOS password protection. So thereare some real security issues here!!

Best of luck, and I hope it works out well.

- Mark

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by adcdesk In reply to SHARING

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by adcdesk In reply to SHARING

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