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Smart, young IT staff: helping them understand "sorry, we can't use your.."

By mirabelle1 ·
I've managed helpdesks in a large IT corporation for five years, but haven't yet been able to master the, "the tool you have written to help increase [productivity and accuracy] of [KPI] is excellent, but [insert 'security/non COE/technical lead rejection' reason here]" conversation.

Granted, these bright young individuals of 19-21 years of age may not have this higher level of thinking. I've done everything I could to try and help get their program approved, but in the instances where I've met rejection and I'm in agreement of it, I cannot seem to bring my employee on board successfully.

And yes, they are a core performer in my team, and we have regular performance and career development meetings to help him find a role more suitable for his skills.

All in all, this wouldn't be a problem if this happened only once, but this particular employee has now tried this FOUR times with me (in his own time) and each time, he ends up with rejection. I worry I'm killing his motivation by being a "no" woman.

Advice would be much appreciated!

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Not really sure I understand why you feel this way

by HAL 9000 Moderator In reply to Smart, young IT staff: he ...

I used to go through the reasoning why things where rejected so that the person understood what it was that they failed to take into account.

I found that just telling them no was no solution but giving them the Official Reasoning even if it was stupid was always the sensible way to proceed as they could improve the way that they worked in an attempt to get their work accepted.

Col

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Hmm you've got an support person who wants to

by Tony Hopkinson In reply to Smart, young IT staff: he ...

develop, and he is, and their excellent output is being rejected for non securirty and non technical reasons?
That can only mean there is something wrong with it business wise ie doesn't offer enough business value.

So given they haven't realised this for themselves, direct them at something that will satisfy your criteria for acceptance. If they are motivated from the desire to develop and move into that arena, what they have to work on to do so will be irrelevant.

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[insert 'security/non COE/technical lead rejection' reason here]"

by seanferd In reply to Smart, young IT staff: he ...

If this is a valid reason, then this budding developer needs to understand writing secure code, or how the code needs to properly integrate with the existing code and business process.

If this is not a valid reason, then welcome the young dev to the world of inertia, corporate, personal, or otherwise. Optimistic and confident people are great, but they need to direct their energies and productivity in a more reality-based manner. (Or start their own company, or work for one which will use their talents.) Heck, I'v gone through the same thing but involving simple, physical processes. If the PTB don't want to listen, they won't listen.

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Hmm..

by mirabelle1 In reply to [insert 'security/non COE ...

If this is a valid reason, then this budding developer needs to understand writing secure code, or how the code needs to properly integrate with the existing code and business process.


You've nailed it as above; and that's the thing he can't seem to understand. He's extremely logical (and I mean programming logical) and doesn't see why the company doesn't see it his way.

Thanks anyway, I'll need to ponder this one and make some mistakes to get this one right.
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Best way would be to get him seconded to your development department

by Tony Hopkinson In reply to Hmm..

for a bit.
It's basically the same problem as the business asking for stuff it turns out it didn't want, or enforcing through one means or another a set of constraints that leaves them with something that they didn't want.

Dealing with that is a key to surviving as a successful developer.
And it's essentially learnt through getting it wrong.
There should be plenty of existing examples to learn from....

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