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Staffing Model

By anderman ·
My team and I are doing some consulting for a midsized insurance company. The company is growing rapidly (last year 40%) and cannot staff its claim reps fast enough to keep up with its growth. What IT resources can I use to begin to solve this problem and properly project staffing needs?

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by rmstoller In reply to Staffing Model

If it is ethical to recruit from relatives
of happy customers of the insurance, then is
it possible to get a brief listing of the
insurance company's most satisfied customer
contacts? If so, how about gently gently
asking said contacts if s/he knows of anyone
(related or not) who might be interested in
working for the consulting firm? I'm wondering if this is better than "raiding"
competitive consulting firms :)

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by anderman In reply to Staffing Model

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by RealGem In reply to Staffing Model

You're not going to find a magic tool that will solve the problem, although it might help you ask the right questions.

The best tool is a spreadsheet. Ask the company to project claims growth for you. This is a key factor, and one that you should not attempt.

How many claims can one rep handle? i.e. what is the capacity of the current system.

How long does it take to train a rep, and how does their productivity change. In other words, what is their learning curve?

You can put these three factors together to get an idea of the projected volume and capacity of your system.

You might also find some value in something called queuing theory. The simplest application of queuing theory can tell you how many bank tellers are required to handle x number of customers. Factors included in the model can include the arrival rate and pattern of customers, the capacity of the "tellers", and so on.

I know someone who has applied queuing theory to the management and staffing ofa call center, and was very successful.

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by anderman In reply to Staffing Model

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by JoOehrlein In reply to Staffing Model

One thing you might also consider is evaluating the work the claim reps are doing. What do they spend most of their time doing? Is it absolutely required that the claim reps be the ones doing that? Perhaps there is a software enhancement that could speed their work. Perhaps some of the work could be offloaded to someone else.

If they're having trouble recruiting, maybe they also need to evaluate the working environment and make sure that people WANT to work there.

Check out the retentionstatistics. Anytime you're having trouble hiring, you kill yourself if you can't keep the people you already have.

You might also consider a referral fee to current employeees who bring in the resume of someone who gets hired.

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by anderman In reply to Staffing Model

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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by anderman In reply to Staffing Model

This question was auto closed due to inactivity

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