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STOP errors. Faulty Power Supply?

By Delosky ·
I recently built a high end system and until I added an AGP card, I had no problems. Since then, I have had nothing but problems. Original specs: ASRock G Pro motherboard (latest BIOS), Intel 2.4 GHz 533 FSB CPU, 256 MB Lifetime RAM, Windows XP SP1, DigitalDoc5 thermal sensor, 420W PS. I built the system and everything was fine, but when I went to add a Ti4600 AGP card (that ASRock says will work on the board) I began getting random STOP errors - 0A, 7F, ... After replacing the motherboard and RAM and reformatting and reinstalling the OS, everything was working fine except that the BIOS was showing 1.8 GHz @ 100 bus instead of 2.4 @ 133 bus. After changing BIOS settings, I now get the STOP errors again. But I also noticed that the DigitalDoc5 would show a real quick power spike right when the STOP error occurs. Is this normal for a STOP error, or do I have a bad power supply or a bad CPU?

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STOP errors. Faulty Power Supply?

by TheChas In reply to STOP errors. Faulty Powe ...

I don't believe that you have a bad power supply.

It may however, be undersized for your system.

How many drives and fans do you have hooked up?
If more than 3 drives, and / or more than 5 fans, you may need a larger power supply.

Many newmotherboards are calling for a MINIMUM of 400 Watts.
That means that a power user will need 500 or 600 Watts!

I also suggest that you add up the wattages for each supply listed on the side of the power supply. Take into acount any limits on total power for 5 and 3.3 volts outputs.
I have seen supplies rated at 400 watts that provide a sustained maximum output of 270 Watts!

Yes, the CPU itself could be the problem, but I suspect that it is a combination of events that are causing the system to draw maximum power.

Chas

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STOP errors. Faulty Power Supply?

by Delosky In reply to STOP errors. Faulty Powe ...

Poster rated this answer

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STOP errors. Faulty Power Supply?

by memyslfni1969 In reply to STOP errors. Faulty Powe ...

It is defiantely you video card the memmory address 0x00000000A is IRQ2 which is reserved in bios in most systems today for video redirected to IRQ 9 the identifiable IRQ for video. the 0x00000007f also indicate video drivers as they begin their IRQrequesets the address 0x00000070 in th in an unknown or supported request by either bios or the hardware. DOn't bother trying MS for info their help files are useless. Try to root out the driver by reading the exact message in your *.dmp files. Viewthe minidmp.dmp files in wordpad using the following fonts if you can find them is makes the coding almost all regular english and all the actual letters are bold while any other charectors are lightened TxfNT08B an ALTSYS Fontographer font 4.0.4 1996. It should give you some idea of the faulty call or requests or the driver causing the problem so you can contact the manufacture well informed and they can solve you problem.Check the shadowing settings for your bios as well this can be cause by in correct bios settings or simple an outdated bios.

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STOP errors. Faulty Power Supply?

by Delosky In reply to STOP errors. Faulty Powe ...

Well I know it isn't the drivers because the system was working okay prior to the card installation and after I rebuilt it. But once I started playing around in the BIOS with the CPU clock speed (the BIOS was reading the CPU at 100MHz bus speed andnot 133MHZ), then I started getting the STOP errors. I think the power it took to run the CPU at 133 instead of 100 was just to much for the faulty PS. After plugging in a known good 350W PS with only the motherboard and 1 HDD, everything was fine. Now the only thing I don't have plugged in is the AGP card, a secondary HDD, and the DigitalDoc5 thermal sensor.

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STOP errors. Faulty Power Supply?

by int In reply to STOP errors. Faulty Powe ...

I think y should test yr memory on faults in clusters. The problem should be resolved when y insert a new memory DIMM.

use Docmem.exe or something like that

Good luck

INT

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STOP errors. Faulty Power Supply?

by Delosky In reply to STOP errors. Faulty Powe ...

Nope, the RAM passed all Windows software and DOS boot tests. I originally had 1 stick of "Lifetime" 2700DDR and bought a second "PNY" 2700DDR just to make sure.

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STOP errors. Faulty Power Supply?

by Delosky In reply to STOP errors. Faulty Powe ...

So now that I know a good 350W PS will run the system fine, my next question is how powerful of a power supply do I need?

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STOP errors. Faulty Power Supply?

by int In reply to STOP errors. Faulty Powe ...

just use a test prg for memory testing
windows and dos boots are not accurate with testing a memory dimm

INT

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STOP errors. Faulty Power Supply?

by Delosky In reply to STOP errors. Faulty Powe ...

Poster rated this answer

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STOP errors. Faulty Power Supply?

by csmith In reply to STOP errors. Faulty Powe ...

You did not understand answer number two.
He pointed you in the right direction.
A PCI card and an AGP card are not driven the same way.
This is not a power supply problem or a CPU problem.
There is nothing wrong with the memory. (DIMMs)
This is a timing problem.
When you increased the bus speed from 100 to 133Mhz and the system went flakey, that was the clue.
Usually the problem is the installation of too slow memory, but not in your case.
The PC will run with a 133 MHz bus, without the AGP card. That means everything else is OK.
The second HD does not really count.
Modern HDs draw only about 5 watts.
The first step to troubleshoot this is, to set both the MB BIOS and the Video BIOS to NOT shadowed.
This forces the instructions to be timed by the original hardware, not the RAM speed.
The MB BIOS is slightly slower, and the AGP Video card is faster, than RAM.
Now back to what #2 (MeMyselfAndI) was trying to tell you.
The error codes all point to the video card.
The failures are an inability to implement the video BIOS functions using the RAM Image (Shadow) at 133MHz.
We know the functions are there and work, because they work at 100MHz.
That points to timing.
Thus, no shadow of the video BIOS as the first test.
(When in doubt, use the hardware, not its virtual image.)
If the No Shadow setting does not work, then its probably time to send the error codes to the video card manufacturer. As stated by MeMySelfAndI, (#2), or, exchange the video card.
Regards, Chris

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