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Tapes into CDs

By Intel Inside Me ·
I have billons of tapes. Is there something that could change tapes in to CD? If it cost, i would love to buy.

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by p.j.hutchison In reply to Tapes into CDs

I have done this myself. You need:
1. A Tape player, a 'Walkman' style will do with
headphone socket.
2. A Sound card with MIC (Microphone) port
3. A cable to connect tape player to sound card
4. Sound sampler software e.g. Wave Editor

To record from tape to CD
1. Load wave editor program, click Record button
2. Play tape in Tape Player (make sure volume is set correctly)
3. Wait till song finishes (may have to time this)
4. Stop Recording
5. Save sample as a WAV, MP3 or whatever
6. Use WMP or iTunes to record music files to CD

I have used this method to record music from my tape collection to CD and be able to hear it on my iPod.

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by Intel Inside Me In reply to

I recorded it but it mayde noice.

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by lhatcher In reply to Tapes into CDs
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by Intel Inside Me In reply to

cool divice. I got it and it works

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by TheChas In reply to Tapes into CDs

2 comments on PJ Hutchinson's answer.

1. You want to use the line in jack, not the microphone in jack on your sound card.

2. If you have high quality tapes, you might want to use a stereo component tape deck as your source.

Other comments:

Most CD Burning suites come with at least a rudimentary audio recorder and editor.

If you wish to clean up the sound from old and noisy tapes, you might want dedicated audio recording and cleanup software.

Audio Cleaning Lab is one.

Here is a link to another.

http://www.voyetra.com/site/products/audiosurgeon/producthome.asp

If your system has on board sound rather than a sound card, I STRONGLY recommend installing a quality sound card for best results.

The critical specifications for a sound card for recording are the signal to noise ratio and frequency response of the A/D section.

I myself use a Turtle Beach Santa Cruz. At one time, this card had the best input section among "affordable" audio cards.

If you desire to get into serious recording, there are a number of dedicated A/D input cards that will allow your PC to rival studio recording equipment.

Chas

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by Intel Inside Me In reply to

Ok thanks.

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by Intel Inside Me In reply to Tapes into CDs

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