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TCP/IP supernet

By Mrgdstuff ·
What type of issues would there be with supernetting a class C address with a 255.255.254.0 subnet.

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TCP/IP supernet

by Stillatit In reply to TCP/IP supernet

None really, but you had better own both of the included ranges. Not only do you need two class C's, but they need to be in the same supernet. (You need, in this case, an even numbered class C and the following odd-numbered class C.)

Example:

192.168.0.x and 192.168.1.x are in the same supernet.

192.168.1.x and 192.168.2.x are NOT in the same supernet, since their network number differs other than in the last bit.

Good luck.

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by Mrgdstuff In reply to TCP/IP supernet

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by McKayTech In reply to TCP/IP supernet

StillAtIt's answer is correct about the ranges - I just wanted to point out that if you're not connected to the Internet, or are connected behind a NAT firewall, you can use any address range you want so the issue of ownership is a moot point.

Also, though, there can be issues with router configurations, depending on the make, model and OS version of the router. You have to make sure the router is set up to handle Classless routing (CIDR).

The other issues are clerical and primarily involve making sure that anyone configuring a network device enters the subnet mask correctly.

paul

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by Mrgdstuff In reply to TCP/IP supernet

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by Mrgdstuff In reply to TCP/IP supernet

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