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Tech Perspective: Prepare for Office.NET

By techperspective ·
You've been hearing quite a lot about Microsoft's .NET initiative lately, but what about one of its key components, Office.NET? Microsoft's been keeping quiet about the details of this Web productivity application service (PAS). If you're not sure what you can expect from Office.NET, how can you plan ahead effectively? And if an upgrade is in your near future, how do you know which road to take?

According to Gartner, don't expect Office.NET to replace the Office suite you know and love. Gartner predicts Microsoft will market Office.NET as a set of services that will complement Office instead. That doesn't mean you should wait around for Office.NET to be launched: Gartner says its features are too vague to influence Office upgrade decisions for now.

What has been your approach to upgrading versions of Microsoft Office in the past? Do you agree with Gartner that it's best to upgrade every other version of Office? How do you feel about the changes coming with Office.NET? What will be the most important factor in deciding whether you implement Office.NET?

You can read the related Gartner article, which will be posted 3 A.M. Monday, at
http://www.techrepublic.com/article.jhtml?id=r00220010305ggp01.htm

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Tech Perspective: Prepare for Office.NET

by JimHM In reply to Tech Perspective: Prepare ...

It's like asking someone to plan for an unknown something to happen at an unkown time, sometime this year.

"What will dotNET have in it?" - don't know excatly! "What will it do" - Don't know for sure! "What functionality will it have" - Don't know excatly it may do this!
How can any corporation plan for anything like that, call a physic friend.

We aren't looking at .NET at all this year and maybe not next year either. We will continue the use and development of JAVA, JAVABEANS, EJB's and JSP's.

We have found that most of MS's first releases are so buggy you need to double your efforts for support. And waiting until the second or third release is the safest.

As for upgrading Office that will depend on their licensing - if it becomes difficult by registering over the internet and separate licensing per copy - then we will start to evaluate other suites. (10,000 licenses of Office)Large volumes of upgrades - each a different license will just be to much effort and the selection of another suite would prove cost effective.

I believe we may be seeing the "DOMS" - (Dieing of Microsoft) - Going the way of IBM. Maybe when Gates loses another few billion in stock prices he will wake up - MS grew because he made it easy to install and use. Now it's turning BLUE - register here, separate licensing, pay for support, pay for certifications, pay for upgrades, can't build a common image for distribution to thousands of pc's (separate licensing), - time to switch gears and move to another suite - Hello Lotus - Gear Up -

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Tech Perspective: Prepare for Office.NET

by techperspective In reply to Tech Perspective: Prepare ...

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Tech Perspective: Prepare for Office.NET

by dmccammishjr In reply to Tech Perspective: Prepare ...

I agree with the somewhat skeptical Gartner position. I read Microsoft's marketing and keep wondering what's in it for the customer to compensate for MS' growth. I use Office 2000 at work because that's what we bought with a new machine. I use Word and Excel 97 at home and don't really miss any function. I'm probably more interested in stability (= productivity) rather than new features.

For PCS as well as other .NET options, I get concerned that my productivity and stability will be challenged when not in good connection to some base. Another concern is the number of bases - I need to move freely working in the office, home (both home and office contexts), and other contexts.

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Tech Perspective: Prepare for Office.NET

by techperspective In reply to Tech Perspective: Prepare ...

Your answer was featured in our Tech Perspective TechMail. To receive your free subscription to the Tech Perspective TechMail, sign up at
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Tech Perspective: Prepare for Office.NET

by kingmans In reply to Tech Perspective: Prepare ...

I work for a Big 5 Business services firm. If we don't upgrade the office version fairly quickly we end up dealing with clients that have upgraded and depending on the upgrade this can create quite a large problem. We end up using a conversion program or installing the new version on Tech Support computers and provide a conversion service for our users.

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by techperspective In reply to Tech Perspective: Prepare ...

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Tech Perspective: Prepare for Office.NET

by flat0027 In reply to Tech Perspective: Prepare ...

It's like Gartner is in bed with MS, but they're not having any sex. Should we--will it hurt--should we wait--whadda ya think so far...

Gartner needs to put this subscription talk in context. First, aren't we all moving toward online storage and software rental where the need to have and to hold on the PC is no longer necessary?

And, we're getting all excited about subscription, from Napster to Webnoize--and to the best of my knowledge, the only industry that has yet to master the fine art of subscription is the porn industry.

Then, there is MS2000 itself. Gartner talks about the bundle as though it is this all-in-one God. Does anyone in their right mind ever use Photodraw or Publisher? Photodraw is THE worst graphics program on the market.

Powerpoint is getting real boring. I'm already passing out at the thought of another PPP at another conference on another screen you can't see.

I'll be damned if I go PP when I can Flash it!

AND, my final point: customization. If MS is heading in this direction, then good--because not everybody needs every program or add-on or plug-in and not everybody needs full functionality.

So if we can XML, personalize and customize our way through the digital minefield--then thumbs up for new developments via Office.Net.

Oh yeah, upgrading? Every other piece of software I own I want to upgrade the second the upgrade notice flashes on my screen. I'm a bug hunter and I like new features so Gartner's recommendation of "every other" is bogus.

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Tech Perspective: Prepare for Office.NET

by techperspective In reply to Tech Perspective: Prepare ...

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