General discussion

Locked

Technical Education In NV??

By dickinsonc ·
Tags: Off Topic
blog root

This conversation is currently closed to new comments.

990 total posts (Page 1 of 99)   01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05   Next
| Thread display: Collapse - | Expand +

All Comments

Collapse -

IMT Student Response to:

by dickinsonc In reply to Technical Education In NV ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<strong>Student responses to the question:</strong>
<br />Author: Charley Dickinson Date: Wednesday, January 26, 2005 19:44<br />
<em>Why is a quality technical education so important in today's marketplace? How did you decide to use TMCC as a place to get your training? What would be your reaction if the technical training you are now receiving were no longer available in this area?</em>
<br />
<br />
<strong>Date: Monday, January 31, 2005 13:21</strong>
<br /> We live in a hi-tech world, we need people qualified to run and up keep our equipment and facilities. I worked in the maintenance department for four months, and could not stay in my job without becoming a student worker. So I figured I might as well get an education and learn the trade while I?m young so I could serve a career. If this training were not available to me I would not be happy about it. I would wonder who made the decision and why they did.<br />
<br />
<strong>Date: Tuesday, February 1, 2005 14:31</strong>
<br />As technology advances machines are taking over some tasks that<br />technician might have done in the past but there are still jobs that require a real person to do them. I chose tmcc because i heard it has good industrial classes, and wanted to further my education. if tmcc's industrial classes were unavailable I would probably working some dead end job.<br />
<br />
<strong>Date: Friday, February 4, 2005 11:43</strong>
<br />A technical education is important today because everything is run by computers. The more technical expertise one has, the better one's employment opportunities. TMCC has an excellent regional reputation for training technicians. If the technical training offered at TMCC were no longer available I would have to major in pre-engineering or accounting.<br />
<br />
<strong>Date: Monday, February 7, 2005 19:58</strong>
<br /> I think that a technical education is important because everything is changing so fast and becoming so much more complex. so in order to stay on top of what is changing you need to have a good education. I chose to attend TMCC because it has a great program with lots of great tool and new things to experience. If it wasn?t for TMCC I would not have the knowledge I have and I would not have such a great job. Without TMCC I would not have the opportunity to learn all the new things there are to learn and I would be so far behind in life. <br />
<br />
<strong>Date: Monday, February 14, 2005 21:32</strong>
<br />As with the increasing sophisticated technology, the equipment systems increase in their multi-level user control and programming methods. Without the availability of qualified technicians, the systems would eventually fail. With courses such as this one and the many others offered by TMCC and other institutions, the ability to properly and timely diagnose and repair problems benefit all in the community. Without the quality of instruction the quantity of qualified technicians would decrease, overburdening the workforce. Discontinuing such programs would be a major loss to all.<br />
<br />
<strong>Date: Sunday, January 30, 2005 6:19pm</strong>
<br />Quality technical education is ESSENTIAL to today?s marketplace because it provides the technicians with the "tools" that it takes to be a productive employee in a ever growing technologically advanced industry. Having the knowledge of how systems work and why they do what the do is crucial to becoming a skilled technician. I chose TMCC for my training simply cause it's the closest school and the only quality training center in the area. If this training wasn't available any longer in the area it would be detrimental to the local industries that utilize these skills in their employees. The labor force would be less qualified for positions, creating problems finding employment and it would create problems for the employers in that they would have fewer resources to find qualified employees.<br />
<br />
<strong>Date: Monday, January 31, 2005 7:04pm</strong>
<br />We can no longer rely on just basic skills to get us by in today?s world. There are<br />certainly more complex integrated systems today that incorporate computer controlled equipment with and a host of other newer technologies. <br />Having the technical education to confidently work on these systems is<br />important in achieving gainful employment. Knowing the rules, codes, regulations and best practices will assure a well rounded, educated person can do their job. Employers are looking for people who need little training and can do their jobs safely, by the code, in a timely matter. <br />With the dwindling manufacturing and industrial markets in this country,<br />competition for higher paying technical jobs will only increase in the foreseeable future. Having a good quality education can only enhance ones opportunities in an ever-changing job market.<br />My general manager recommended TMCC to me shortly after I transferred to the Reno area. He has had contacts with the schools administration and staff members over the years and given them positive marks. I have also talked with several co-workers who are attending or have attended the school in the past. They also have given TMCC high marks and have had mostly positive experiences at school. The classes offered and the times are convenient for me to attend while working full time. I believe the types on technical classes available are applicable to help me in my everyday work. <br />I have attended a fair number of community colleges and many seminars<br />over the last 25 years. The institute and education is only as good as its teachers. I?m drawn to learn more from teachers who have been in industry over the years and bring back to the classroom real world examples and experience.<br />In the past I have inquired about on-line training for the maintenance people who work for me. However, the cost is substantially higher than attending a community college like TMCC. From a company standpoint it would be a burden particularly on small businesses if education cost increase. Thus halting the technical background for the company?s competitive edge and hindering opportunities for their employees. In the same manner convenience and cost would certainly factor in if I had a child that wanted to attend a technical school. If TMCC were not available it would certainly be a hardship on most working class families to send their children elsewhere.<br />
<br />
<strong>Date:</strong>
<br />The reason I came to TMCC for there technical programs is Idaho State University was a little to expensive for me. I was paying 5,000 a semester even with the WUE scholarship and I was only taking welding classes. Another reason was I couldn?t fight fire for a full season going to ISU because they had pipe in the fall semester and Tig in the spring semester. At TMCC I am able to fight fire and pick up my welding classes in the Spring. If TMCC tech programs were to disappear I would probably move back to Elko and go through GBC welding program.<br />
<br />
<strong>Author: Charley Dickinson Date: Wednesday, February 9, 2005 17:08</strong>
<br />
<em>As compared to other training you have had in the past, how do you rate the training and facilities here at Edison (be specific, what did you like, what did you dislike)? If the technical training you are now receiving were no longer available in this area (courses cancelled, program dropped), how "vocal" would you be ("oh well, just another unneeded program"... through... writing letters to Congressmen, media, etc.)</em>
<br />
<br />
<strong>Date: Thursday, March 3, 2005 14:40</strong>
<br />I have been very pleased with the training, instructors, and facilities at the Edison site. Although I get the feeling that you could do great things with a little larger budget, the resources have been present to get the job done and provide a good educational experience. <br />I believe that the loss of either the Industrial Maintenance or the Electronics Technology programs would be a significant **** to the community. It is often said that this area's economy needs to diversify beyond gaming to provide stable, long term job growth. I know of a number of local companies that have moved here from California, and they depend on classes here at Edison to upgrade the skills of their workers.<br />As a large number of electricians and technicians in the 'baby boomer' group begin to retire, the lack of skilled qualified workers is already being felt. Even though many manufacturing jobs are being lost to Asia, the work of a technician must be done on site. So there will continue to be a very strong demand for technicians to program, troubleshoot, install, and service electronic systems in industry. <br />I realize that the programs here are under threat of reduction or elimination, and believe this is very unwise. There is nowhere else in this area where similar high-quality education can be obtained. Most of the students in the programs here work in the area and have families, so relocating to attend school is not an option.<br />A focus on effective marketing of the Edison programs could make a large difference, in my opinion. There are employers and workers in our community who don't even know the programs here exist, or don't know what is offered that they could benefit from. Even TMCC counselors appear to be very poorly informed about the programs at Edison, based on comments from a number of very credible students.<br />Employers in this community are having trouble filling jobs that pay $30/hour or more, and the very skills needed for these jobs are being taught right here at Edison. There appears to be a disconnect between making students aware of the opportunities, and working with the employers. The results of solving this issue could be dramatic.<br />I have written to the TMCC President and VP of Academic Affairs, with copies to the Governor. The replies sound nice, but seem to paint a different picture that what I actually observe at Edison. <br />
<br />
<strong>Date:</strong>
<br />I am writing this letter to express my feelings about the needed training at a facility like TMCC - Edison College. There seems to be a growing concern lately about whether this is needed or not. I feel strongly that it is needed more now than ever.<br /> My 20+ years as a facility technician began in my senior year of high school, and as a graduate from a 2 year vocational school in New York State in the building trades. In these 20 years, I have taken many night school classes to keep up with the ever changing demands that this field encounters. <br />Having relocated to Reno six years ago, I have kept up with my continuing education at Edison TMCC. The courses I have taken there are excellent, and I feel with any career, trade or occupation , even though you have a Certificate or Degree you need a place to challenge your abilities, compare and trade ideas, and keep up with others in the ever changing market. Yes, there are independent courses available that I have taken but they do not seem to fill the needs of an area as a local school can.<br />Hopefully, with this letter you will see the needs from the community and keep the continuing education programs available to the public.<br />
<br />
<strong>Date: Monday, February 7, 2005 4:04pm</strong>
<br />I hope that someone important reads this!<br />All of the technical training that I have received has either been on the job training or from TMCC. I have been a student at TMCC since I was junior in high school. The first course. the first courses that i took was building trades. When I graduated from high school I got a job working for Gurr's Roofing Heating and Sheet metal. On the job I was already ahead of the game for a young apprentice. During the four semesters that I spent in the Building trades program, other high school students like me built two, two bed two bath homes complete ready for the real estate market and they sell fast because they are quality built homes as a result of instructors who are skilled professionals in their field. Also, don?t forget all of the dedicated students like me who need trades to make a living. You also shouldn't forget that we are the people who build your homes,<br />and fix them. TMCC is home to many other technical trades that our economy relies on every day, automotive, welding, Industrial Maintenance, I could go on and on. The question you need to ask is how much do you need to train us. Or we could be un-trained and then we would be sure to do it nice because we would do it twice or you could do it your self. I also have taken five semester of welding and I have a certification to show for it translation $. Now I am currently in my third semester of Industrial Maintenance, and I won't be happy if some smart guy cancels my program. Trades are a large potion of my studies but I also study the basics; English, mathematics?, and sciences. To answer<br />your last question I would search elsewhere for the training required to do the job right not twice. <br />
<br />
<strong>Date: Wednesday, April 6, 2005 9:08pm</strong>
<br />This is mi first technical course in this country and my own thinking is, this course is very good. Sometimes when I don't understand something, the teacher explains it several ways so I can learn and understand the class. I don't understand why this course is no longer available.<br />TMCC's decision to remove this course may affect many people. It is my understanding that TMCC's main purpose is to teach and to help the development of the people and by cutting any course such as this may not be in everybody's best of interest. I would appreciate it very much if you would reconsider making this decision. <br />
<br />
<strong>Date:</strong>
<br />The TMCC technical trades department was once a star in the school?s offerings to prospective students. These programs were actively promoted and supported to attract a student pool large enough to support a growing program. What happened?<br />In the 1980s and early 1990s the focus of the Community College was two fold. Academic preparation for students advancing to the University and a technical education programs for the trades and service industries. Each program had several instructors who brought applied theoretical and field experience to their respective programs. This technical excellence made graduates of these programs highly desired by local employers. <br />Beginning in the late 1990s the programs began to change. These changes included program and staff cutbacks and a focus on the pure academia of college bound students. The recruitment of new students toward this new focus further reduced the student populations within the technical programs. Hence today, the programs are typically centered around a single core instructor and struggling to get enough students to run a quality program.<br />If the Community College decides to drop these programs; I believe there would be a backlash from students, alumni, the local and federal government, and local industries. These groups would demand reinstatement of these or equivalent programs. The local governments have been pushing for diversification of the local economy using high technology. The question is: where will the technicians and machinists come from if there is no program to train the required workforce in the Reno area?<br />Hopefully TMCC will see the light and properly support and promote these necessary programs.</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://dickinsonc.blogspot.com/2005/04/imt-student-response-to.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

Resignation letter sent to TMCC administration by part-time instructor

by dickinsonc In reply to Technical Education In NV ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<span style="font-family:lucida grande;">
<span style="color:#000066;">"I regret that this will be my last semester of teaching.<br />Too many things have happened and many concerns have not<br />been met by the college. I have waited too long for equipment.<br />We should have had the equipment for at least 2 plus semesters.<br />Manufacturing and Industry is upset. They have asked me if<br />I would be willing to teach if they got equipment themselves<br />and didn't use the college system. They don't care about credits.<br />They want training.We need less meetings and planning. Instead,<br />we need more action. It's been a great ride, but it's over.<br />Thank you."</span> </span>
<br />
<span style="font-family:lucida grande;" />
<br />
<span style="font-family:lucida grande;">
<span style="font-family:courier new;font-size:85%;">Resignation letter sent to TMCC administration by part-time instructor</span> <br />
</span>
<span style="font-family:lucida grande;" />
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://dickinsonc.blogspot.com/2005/05/resignation-letter-sent-to-tmcc.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

Dear Senator Ensign

by dickinsonc In reply to Technical Education In NV ...

Dear Senator Ensign,<br /><br />It is with great regret I feel I must write this letter to you today. When Rich Green wrote the grant for Edison (TMCC) and you pushed it through and got it funded, there was no one more optimistic than I. However, the path that TMCC administration has taken has caused me to question, and ultimately lose all hope. I may be wrong, but it appears the administration?s handling of this project is at the least ludicrous, at worst criminal.<br /><br />It was my understanding that a new position was to be created, ?Manufacturing Technology Instructor?, and that the new position would interface and/or the IMT department would merge into it (there are seven IMT classes which I developed which are specifically mentioned in the grant). I was a stunned to find my contract is not being renewed. I still do not know if the IMT instructor position will be filled or is gone. The new MT instructor position also has not been filled (I applied, but it appears the committee felt I nor the other applicants were not qualified,). The College is continuing the search. <br />Another problem, in my opinion, neither the machining (CNC) instructor nor myself were consulted as to what we felt would be desired for lab equipment (although the grant had outlined a plan, it was clear from the first meeting that the administration was not going to follow it). I do not know whether this had anything to do with the CNC instructor quitting, but I do know that he is pretty well disgusted and will not work for TMCC again. The electronics instructor is also leaving. The administration will tell you he is retiring (true) but he also is fed up, and would not stay under any circumstances. The diesel instructor is retiring. The construction trades program is gone. The truck-driving program is gone. The librarian is gone. The ?grants person? is gone. The testing center?. gone?<br /><br />In hindsight I see now that the ?reassignment? of Dean Verbeck was the beginning of the end for technical education at TMCC (automotive, welding and computer repair will most likely be all that survives). It?s been like watching a train wreck. Although I don?t think it can be saved, I would encourage you to look into where the money for the grant is being spent (maybe enlist the folks out at GBC and get their opinion). Even then, I?ve been told that when the equipment comes in, it will be boxed and stored. I?m sure the equipment in my labs (about $60,000 worth of equipment I have collected in the past five years) will also be ?stored?. I?d wager that equipment, once boxed & stored, will never again see the light of day (except maybe at state surplus).<br /><br />I?ve heard rumors that several local manufacturers would like to start their own training center (free from ?academic ham-handedness? no doubt). If this is true, then maybe this equipment could be donated. Or maybe we need a state technical college system here in Nevada (I?d look up Dean Verbeck to run it). Right now, the only industrial education that will be delivered in northern Nevada will be delivered by Great Basin College (great program by the way). As I was the ?part-time? electrical instructor for WNCC, and developing courses for Nevada Works, and worked for MAP, and Business & Industry (both Reno and Carson City), ? my employment back in the private sector may leave a bit of a ?hole? in industrial training in this area.<br /><br />Before coming to TMCC, I was employed for eight years by a national training company (Sr. Instructor & Program Coordinator, electrical controls division). I quit a $64K job ($85K w/bonus?, close to $100K ?total compensation package?) to go to work for TMCC ($41K) because I really thought I could make a difference (plus got tired of flying out Monday, flying back Friday). I guess the good news is that I will again be contributing quite a bit more to the tax rolls. The ?bad? news is now that I?m a concerned taxpayer again? I?m going to watching TMCC & their handling of the vocational / occ.ed. programs like a hawk!<br /><br />I don?t want to embarrass the administration at TMCC, nor harm the instructors (great instructors by the way? never seen such a dedicated bunch). But if it comes down to the ?good of the students? vs. ?the good of the College?, I?ll side with the students.<br /><br />Thank You for your attention to this matter.<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://dickinsonc.blogspot.com/2005/05/dear-senator-ensign.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

An open letter to the VPAA

by dickinsonc In reply to Technical Education In NV ...

Jowel C. Laguerre May 6. 2005<br />Vice President for Academic Affairs<br />Truckee Meadows Community College<br /><br /><br />Mr. Laguerre,<br /><br />Last year (at the precise time prescribed by UCCSN code... and as a total surprise to me)?. You decided to hand me my walking papers. When I asked (then) about who would continue the IMT program (especially the new Manufacturing Technologies degree) you did not answer (actually asked me something about could I teach math)? About a month later, at a Manufacturing Advisory Group meeting, I again inquired as to who would be teaching these new proposed classes? This time you answered "We have a year to find somebody". <br />The letter thanking me for my application (Manufacturing Technologies Instructor) states the College is going to ?continue the search?. The letter notes that there were ?a number of well-qualified candidates? (however none were hired). While I applaud your decision to find the most qualified instructor possible for the new position, handling of this does bring to mind an old proverb about switching horses in mid-stream. The academic year is about over, and it appears your search to find this ?new and improved? instructor has, so far, been fruitless. <br /><br />At the end of the semester, I have obtained employment back in the private sector. So closes my thirteen year career in training and education. As a result I will no longer be training for MAP, Nevada Works, Business & Industry or WNCC, which almost certainly will mean bringing in out of state ?hard-skill? trainers to service local manufacturers and new companies relocating to Northern Nevada. I have informed my students that while I will not be returning next semester, I have been assured by the College the program will continue; there will be new class offerings, and there will be instructors hired (it would appear you actually have three ?full-time? positions to fill: IMT, Electronics, and Manufacturing Technology and, I believe you will discover also a couple of ?part-time? positions). <br /><br />As a concerned Nevada citizen and taxpayer, I hold you to the task. I can only hope, for the sake of community and students, you are up to it. Regrettably, while you have had the option to expand the programs, all I have seen you do is ?fire? the Dean and ?shoot the only available horse?! I hold you personally responsible for the future of these programs at Edison. President Ringle has accepted grant money and I do expect you to find qualified instructors (qualifications at the very least equal to mine and superior to those applicants rejected in the last round of interviews) and to institute the program as detailed in the grant. <br /><br />I hope you are as proud of your past accomplishments as I am of mine.<br /><br /><br /><br />Charles L Dickinson <br />(Former) Instructor, Industrial Maintenance Technology<br />Truckee Meadows Community College<br /><br /><br />CC: Faculty Senate<br />President P. Ringle<br />Senator J. Ensign<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://dickinsonc.blogspot.com/2005/05/open-letter-to-vpaa.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

To: Faculty Senate, TMCC

by dickinsonc In reply to Technical Education In NV ...

To: Faculty Senate, TMCC 5/10/05<br />From: Charles L. Dickinson<br />(Former) Instructor: Industrial Maintenance Technology<br />TMCC Applied Industrial Technology, Edison Campus<br /><br />As this is my last semester of teaching at TMCC (due to non-renewal of contract) I believe it is the faculty who must ultimately demand that programs the College is on record of supporting are actually supported. If the following are not addressed, I believe the coming ?train wreck? at Edison will doom the center into a ?technology center? in name only (one might look at the technology center at Montgomery College for example).<br /><br />In my opinion, currently there are no faculty left at Edison who are qualified to teach industrial/manufacturing subjects in the mechanical/ electrical/ electronics field. This is due mainly to the current administration whose measures resemble those of the ?PHB? of Dilbert fame. Since the ?reassignment? of Dean Verbek, and unfortunate self-destruction of Associate Dean Green, there has been a collapse of leadership and support for the programs and personnel at Edison. While blaming the faculty is a time honored tradition, upon examination it is just not the case here (although the administration has done an excellent job of changing the focus of a once tight group into ?protect turf at all costs?). Although there will be plenty of problems for the new MSET Dean to solve, the following in ?my? area are critical to the continuation of industrial / manufacturing programs as well as the reputation of the College, and must be resolved well before the start of the new semester. This concerns me greatly as I have put a great deal of effort into this program and felt workforce development was the mandate. The economic loss to the community and personal loss to the students will be significant if current programs are not supported and promised programs are not instituted. The problems as I see them:<br /> <br />1)The Manufacturing Technologies Instructor position has not been filled.<br /><em>Note: The MT instructor I assume will be handling the CNC machining classes as the part-time instructor has had enough and has quit.</em><br />2)The Electronics instructor appears also to have ?resigned?.<br />3)The IMT instructor position (my former position) is open and has never, to my knowledge, been posted as such.<br /><em>At the very least, someone with at least the skills I possess will be needed to handle the ?electrical? training. Pleas note that even if one is familiar with electrical concepts it does not make one qualified in all aspects of the field! Even though I started out in electronics, the field is extremely specialized and I have found very few ?experts? spanning both electrical and electronics). In addition, there are also a world of differences between residential, commercial, and industrial electrical (not to mention control, automation, and instrumentation)</em>? <br /><br />It appears ?The College? feels it can find one ?super instructor? to do it all. In my travels I?ve only met one man who could perhaps meet all the ?requirements? in the MT Instructor position (granted I don?t travel much in academic circles, possibly I?ve missed these ?super instructors?).. <br /><em>In my opinion, while the electrical/electronics fields might possibly be blended together (even though they are separate fields), finding one instructor who is able to teach these in addition to mechanical / machining will be extremely difficult, especially at the salary offered.</em><br /><br />The Bottom Line?<br />1) I have been perusing the ?classifieds? and national search engines looking for a training position (preferably local as this is home and god knows the need for training in this area)! I have been struck by the lack of recruiting being done for these open instructor positions. Last Sunday?s RGJ job postings are representative of what I have been seeing; half a dozen TMCC posts, not one word on IMT or MT. The College may argue that to advertise locally is a waste of money (I agree, it?s been done before, the local talent pool at the salary offered is sparse to non-existent), but why am I not seeing any postings for these positions on any national search?s either? <br />2) Mr. Laguerre has repeatedly stated ?we have plenty of time? and has informed my students of this fact <br />3) In addition, I have been silent when involved in tours by new industry visiting Edison. While the programs at Edison were being dismantled, I was being introduced as the IMT, electrical control & PLC instructor, and my programs were being promoted (and available)!<br /><br />Therefore, I would suggest that the positions be aggressively advertised and promoted. To generate response at a national level, a fair and realistic salary range be posted. A contingency plan must also be formulated (waiting until the last minute as the Administration did with the electronics instructor last Fall is not good enough). I will expect the selected candidates to have superior qualifications to those who are being replaced; (In this I must insist). My students deserve no less and, as the College has promised industry and the legislature there will be training available, (numerous RGJ articles attest to this as well) the College must keep live up to it?s commitment?s, or lose all credibility.<br /><br />And one personal note: As to ?reassigning? and ?non-reappointment? and ?non-renewal of contract? (and other such fine ?termination verbiage?)? how dense does one have to be to fire the bus driver while the bus is in motion? <br /><br />Thank You for you time. Sorry to raise the alarm but the hour grows late.<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://dickinsonc.blogspot.com/2005/05/to-faculty-senate-tmcc.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

<strong>Re: Front Page article RGJ 5/18/05</strong>

by dickinsonc In reply to Technical Education In NV ...

To: Ray Hagar (RGJ)<br /><br /><strong>Re: Front Page article RGJ 5/18/05<br /></strong><span style="color:#ff0000;">?Lawmakers could boost high-school trade training?.. Senators want to increase funding??<br /></span><br />An excellent proposal, however ?students whose motivation in school centers around career and technical education? is not a new idea (<em>I won?t tell you my grade point Freshman & Sophomore years in high school, but after changing to ?Industrial Arts? I did make the honor roll Senior year</em&gt. But what about those students who have already ?dropped out? or are ?underemployed?, or plan to continue on to college or just want to increase their job skills?<br /><br /><strong>The Community College system should be serving the community here</strong>.<br /><span style="color:#ff0000;">But why are the ?CTE.? instructors quitting or being laid off (even while money is flowing into the programs)? </span><br />Sure, there are plenty of ?instructors? coming out of College (with no practical experience), and some very talented people with plenty of experience but no teaching experience (or ?proper? credentials). I have been teaching full time for TMCC, part time for WNCC, teaching classes for MAP & B&I, and developing classes for Nevada Works (along with continuing my association with NTT). These are all ?CTE? training organizations (in one form or another). Because of TMCC?s ?short-sightedness?, these organizations will have to find another electrical, automation, instrumentation & control instructor. <em>Note: These organizations are disappointed that my contract with TMCC was not renewed and, with a loss of benefits, I can no longer do part-time training for industry,<br /></em><br />I have repeatedly tried to bring this subject up (to RGJ) to inform the community of the loss, no one seems the least bit interested. Why?<br /><br />I am currently attempting to receive permission to publish at least parts of three resignation letters. They are not very ?polite? letters, and show the frustration of skilled vocational instructors up against a rigid system.<br />Thank You<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://dickinsonc.blogspot.com/2005/05/re-front-page-article-rgj-51805.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

Open Letter to TMCC admin

by dickinsonc In reply to Technical Education In NV ...

I was asked the other day why I thought the AIT classes had such low enrollment... after thinking about it, I answered <em>"marketing" (or more specifically, lack thereof).</em><br />As I have just finished the last of my classes in this area for MAP & NTT, I believe this to be true (as I had 8 students in the MAP class, even with NO hands-on equipment thank you) and 14 students in the NTT class (at $1195 a head for a 3 day class!). Seems to be some interest here? (especially in short-courses), which brings me to my point?<br /><strong>Looking over the Sunday paper classifieds, I see a nice big ad for TMCC (as per usual?) but see no mention of recruitment for the ?Manufacturing Technologies Instructor? (or any instructors for that matter, just a lot of admin & staff positions? again as per usual). </strong><br />When is TMCC going to actively recruit for these MT & IMT positions? There?s only a couple of months left & there really isn?t any ?canned? curriculum out there for the PLC program I?m aware of (the only reason I got it off the ground that first semester was I already had a lot of it in the can from other jobs ?.). <br />And? IF & when the new manufacturing tech courses are offered, are we going to see any mention of it in the media, or will these programs be left to die like the IMT program?<br />cl<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://dickinsonc.blogspot.com/2005/06/open-letter-to-tmcc-admin.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

Technical Instructor Recruitment

by dickinsonc In reply to Technical Education In NV ...

Searching higheredjobs.com with a search string of state of NV only.... I see no mention of Manufacturing Tech. instructor or CNC machining instructor (although I do see a drafting instructor position among the many "Deans" & "Specialists" TMCC is looking for). I do note that GBC & WNCC seems to be actively pursuing Technical Instructors.<br />see: <br />http://www.higheredjobs.com/freetext/SearchJobs_Action.cfm?Keyword=&JobCat=&PosType=1&State=NV&InstType=2&InstType=3&Submit=Search+Jobs <br /><br />It isn't going to look very good for the Accreditation coming up if there are no qualified instructors for the program is it? (seems like GBC is looking good with theirs)<br />http://www.gbcnv.edu/acred/mod.php?mod=userpage&menu=3811&page_id=11 <br /><br />Just a thought<br />cl<p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://dickinsonc.blogspot.com/2005/06/technical-instructor-recruitment.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

Some good news (for a change)

by dickinsonc In reply to Technical Education In NV ...

<div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<span style="font-family:trebuchet ms;">
<span style="color:#33cc00;">
<strong>Good News!!!</strong>
</span>
<br />TMCC (in their finite wisdom) has posted two of my former classes (out of seven) in the Fall Schedule.<br />
<br />These are both intro classes (an introductory electrical and an into to PLC) but, if there is a building to house them, means they haven?t killed the program yet! I don?t know the man who is teaching the ?electrical? class, but Randy, who is teaching the PLC class, is a good guy who I know will be giving 110%.<br />
<br />
<span style="color:#cc0000;">
<strong>Bad news</strong>
</span> (gawd I hate to be so negative all the time)? Rumor has it that the electrical apprenticeship program is going to sever ties with TMCC (do to lack of support). Hopefully they will align with Great Basin College (who has an excellent record of supporting vocational/technical education) or possibly WNCC (which I hear is expanding their offerings in Industrial Maintenance due to TMCC?s inability to service this area). </span>
<br />
<span style="font-family:Trebuchet MS;">
<em>(more as soon as I hear...)</em>
</span>
</div><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://dickinsonc.blogspot.com/2005/09/some-good-news-for-change.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Collapse -

Check-out newspaper article

by dickinsonc In reply to Technical Education In NV ...

<span style="color:#990000;">Check out article in "The Plain Dealer" Business section 10/16/05<br /></span><strong>Blue-collar blues: Workers needed </strong><br />Many trades face shortage in work force<br /><br /><a href="http://www.cleveland.com/search/index.ssf?/base/business/1129368699179170.xml?bxbiz&coll=2#continue">http://www.cleveland.com/search/index.ssf?/base/business/1129368699179170.xml?bxbiz&coll=2#continue</a><br /><br /><br />Letters generated due to article:<br /><br />To: <a href="mailto:agrant@plaind.com">agrant@plaind.com</a><br /><br /><br />I've been a vocational "trainer" (in the trades) for over 13 years now. I used to work for a national training outfit, (that paid me more money than God....) but got tired of only getting home on week-ends.<br /><br />So..... I went to work for the local Community College her in Reno (NV), at about half pay, and brought them seven "Industrial Maintenance" courses which I developed (plus put them on-line on the web).<br /><br />Then they brought in the new ?administration? who (as near as I can figure) decided that the CC should be a ?mini-university?, and to **** with that ?dirty fingernail, ******* step-child? voc-ed program! (since they ?reassigned? the Dean, and started ?non-renewing? contracts, they have set occupational/vocational programs back 100 years).<br /><br />Yes, I was one of those ?non-renewed? (so I guess this sounds like bitter grapes). I should be thankful (from the money standpoint anyway). Taught 4 days last week (for the old company which seems delighted to have me back), spent 9 days on the road, and should clear $5,000 after expenses.<br /><br />But I can guarantee that no high school or college student will be getting the benefits of my experience (not at $400/day per head). But I have learned (finally) that ?no good deed goes unpunished? (and won?t make that mistake again.<br /><br />Keep up the good work?. And take a look at your local Community College to see if they are doing anything to solve the problem (besides talk it to death).<br /><br />CL Dickinson<br /><br /><br />To: <a href="mailto:lpowers@rgj.com">lpowers@rgj.com</a><br /><br />CC: <a href="mailto:mmartine@rgj.com">mmartine@rgj.com</a><br /><br />Read a good news article (in the business section) while passing through Ohio on business... "Blue-collar blues: workers needed"? (see link)<br /><br />http://www.cleveland.com/search/index.ssf?/base/business/1129368699179170.xml?bxbiz&coll=2#continue<br /><br />Ms. Grant makes some really good points (I know... I've been a vocational/technical trainer for over 13 years). I also know that the local Community College (which really wants to be a mini-university so bad it can't stand it) has had so many chances to help with this problem... but really doesn't like associating with that "dirty fingernail" crowd (again very definite, just look at the voc-ed people that have been ?non-renewed? or ?reassigned?? not to mention those who have retired early or quit because of the total lack of support).<br />Note: I?m sure the ?informational department? at TMCC has told you ?all is well.. there is no problem? just a few disgruntled employees making waves? (as the Titanic slowly slips deeper)?<br /><br />Be a good topic to tackle? I?d love to do it myself or help? (with or without the CC angle) especially since TMCC did not renew my contract and I?m only doing ?project-based? training a few days out of the month (nationally) for the same money.<br /><br />CL Dickinson<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><a href="http://www.cleveland.com/search/index.ssf?/base/business/1129368699179170.xml?bxbiz&coll=2#continue"></a><p><div class="blogdisclaim"><a href="http://dickinsonc.blogspot.com/2005/10/check-out-newspaper-article.html">This post originally appeared on an external website</a></div>

Back to After Hours Forum
990 total posts (Page 1 of 99)   01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05   Next

Related Discussions

Related Forums