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Than it was then?

By Oz_Media ·
Okay, some who know me have seen me post my confusion over 'than' being replaced with 'then'.

ie: "It was greater THAN I had expected" is often written as "It was greater THEN I had expected"

or as noticed in Google's SketchUp tips today, "Looking around Google Earth is more fun then a winning spree of solitaire and it looks more productive to your boss too."

There's the use of THEN when THAN should be used again.

From what I recall, THEN is used as a pronoun for time, not as a comparitive remark.

Is this a new example of how English being trashed by those who have never been corrected or is it that so many people make the same mistake that it has now become acceptable English. A real pet peeve...not as bad as saying you COULD care less though (shivers up spine)...that is becoming more and more annoying.

So, what is it?
"Looking around Google Earth is more fun then a winning spree" or is it
"Looking around Google Earth is more fun than a winning spree"

Has than now become then?

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"Has than now become then?"

by CharlieSpencer In reply to Than it was then?

No.

Also, "effects" isn't "affects". The first one's a noun, the other is a verb.

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That's my horror

by Oz_Media In reply to "Has than now become then ...

I have always had issues with Effects vs Affects. That's why I use an editor for copy. :) But I agree it's a mistake, like how many M's and S's to use in commission.

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Could of...

by boxfiddler Moderator In reply to That's my horror

I could of used correct English and said 'could have' instead... :)

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That's my horror

by Oz_Media In reply to "Has than now become then ...

I have always had issues with Effects vs Affects. That's why I use an editor for copy. :) But I agree it's a mistake, like how many M's and S's to use in commission.

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Experience teaches me

by mjd420nova In reply to Than it was then?

The mix up is usually made by those who are not high school graduates. These are simple english that is taught in american high schools. "There" and "their" are the most common I see, but the two you point out are pretty common too. I could cite many more but as long as I get the jist of what's being said, it doesn't bother me. The broken english that is common to Indian and Arabic immigrants really makes it difficult to read and harder to understand when spoken. That does steam me, as most are supposed to be citizens and should be able to read and write the language.

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Hey, I am not a high school grad

by w2ktechman In reply to Experience teaches me

and I know the difference. Also I do not read too much except online and tech books.

Does this mean that I am smarter than most?
I think not, I must have picked this up in school at some point.

Maybe it is due to mixed language students, and others who do not have language skills.
My little bro for example, when in Afghanistan, he used to write every few weeks. We could barely make out what he was trying to write, and he was a high school grad....

I do not think that it really has much to do with if they are dropouts or not, but the quality of education and the will to learn proper English!

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Bingo

by Oz_Media In reply to Hey, I am not a high scho ...

Well said. People learn English from hearing it, not from reading it and payign attention to the root, meaning or context of words.

That's why people say (my buggest pet peeve again!) "I could care less". This completely detracts from teh intent of the comment, it s so illogical that it makes me puke. Don't people THINK about what they say or do they just hear it and parrot it?

From reading many posts here, I'd say parrot is the key, not because of grammar (everyone knows mine is far from perfect) in a forum, but there are so many here who simply parrot what has already been said, often missing the conext and removing validity from their comments.

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Why?

by Oz_Media In reply to Experience teaches me

Why do you expect today's immigrants to read and write your version of the English language? Are "Americans" not just immigrants too?

Is it a need for conformity? A fear of disassociation or undetectable wrongdoing? Or is it just another illustration how instead of being mulitcultural (as some Americans feel they are), America is simply a melting pot of culture?

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reminds me of a joke

by Neon Samurai In reply to Experience teaches me

"That does steam me, as most are supposed to be citizens and should be able to read and write the language."

the question explaimed - "Why cain't they learn to speak propper Amarican (written for accent)?"

the answer asked politely - "That doesn't sound like Mohawk, Can't you speak proper American?"

Poor language skills suck but when it's a second language, there is room for acceptance along with improvement. It's the people who grew up speaking and writting the local English dialect that have little excuse. That includes my own poor grammar and spelling after growing up speaking English.

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English as a second language

by CharlieSpencer In reply to reminds me of a joke

Hey, as long as you're making the effort, that counts for a lot with me. Now if you want to become a citizen and expect to the test to be written in a language other then English, we may have a point of contention.

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