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To Touch or Not to Touch

By Sheryl V ·
We are beginning the automation of an automated overtime scheduling process involving Employee Self-Service Kiosks. We used to have production employees volunteer for OT with paper & pen & supervisros fill schedule slots accordingly trying to match preferences. The original automation concept was to use touch-screen kiosks to volunteer, & to keep it as simple as the "Gift Registry at Target" because 30+ percent of our end-users are NOT computer savvy.

Vendor is recommending not using touch screens & going with mouse & keyboard only. We are looking at Nema 4 & 12 standards for the enclosures, so the mouse would be integrated in the keyboard. The goal is to keep transaction times to a minimum as the OT volunteers are production line employees.

Any solid arguments or knowledge on whether "To Touch or Not to Touch" will be accepted! Thanks!

P.S. Can the touch screen & mouse be used interchangeably?

PS We are deciding Touch or No Touch TODAY at 10:30 CST so Immediate HELP is needed!

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To Touch or Not to Touch

by Ann777 In reply to To Touch or Not to Touch

Acceptance of a new system depends on whether the employees who will be using the system, have had any input into it. It depends on how you introduce it and whether or not you take the time to train staff on how to use it.

The touch screen kiosks that I've setup before have been as a touch screen directory (where do I go from here type of maps). They work well for people that are aware of them -- which menas that the kiosks for your purpose needs to be in plain sight... where staff will not forget to use it if they wish to work OT.

You should be able to swap mouse and keyboard if so desired, but you need to take that question to your vendor (We locked the keyboard, mouse and cpu in a cabinet below the unit).

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To Touch or Not to Touch

by Sheryl V In reply to To Touch or Not to Touch

The union is involved in the whole process, we have 3 reps on the project team. My question is more that the vendor is recommending NOT using touch screens when our original concept was FOR touch screens. Locations will be in the same place currentsign-ups are.

Training will definitely be covered.

The whole issue is to Touch or Not to Touch, I'm looking for solid arguments on why NOT to touch as we are under the impression that we WANT to touch.

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To Touch or Not to Touch

by maxwell edison In reply to To Touch or Not to Touch

My observation is that the touch screens are easier and faster for those who are not computer savvy and/or familiar with the system. They are appearing more and more in places to interact with customers and the like. They are being used in airports for checking in passengers, restaurants to place orders, and grocery stores for quick and easy check out.

This is just opinion, since I’ve never implemented a touch screen system, but it is based on observation and from the perspective of a user who would like to quickly get through something like that.

? With those systems, a person can be more easily “guided” to the next step instead of trying to figure out what to do next.

? With a keyboard and mouse a person might be more prone to “tinker”, so to speak, and attempt to go someplace he/she is not really authorized to go.

? No keyboard and/or mouse to get grungy and/or damaged.

? Less space required.

Look at these links for some more “food for thought”.

Designing a Touch Screen Kiosk for Older Adults: A Case Study:

http://wsupsy.psy.twsu.edu/surl/usabilitynews/3W/kiosk.htm

Touch Screen Introduction to HTML-Kit:

http://www.chami.com/html-kit/help/screen.html

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http://www.touchcontrols.com/tci/touch_info.htm

REMOVE SPACES from the pasted URLs.

Good luck

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To Touch or Not to Touch

by Sheryl V In reply to To Touch or Not to Touch

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To Touch or Not to Touch

by mswit10296 In reply to To Touch or Not to Touch

No and No and No and No mouse or kybd. There are touch bezels out there that will give you a touch screen scenario. The main objection to a touch screen is up front COST. My bet is this vendor does not have much experience with just how abusive customers can be. We went thru this at a large car company. We designed and manufactured a gismo that the mechanics used to trouble shoot the car. You should have seen what they did to the prototypes that had things which they could pull. DON’T DO IT!!!! Believe me things will be better without something upon which the customer can take her/his frustration.

mike

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To Touch or Not to Touch

by Sheryl V In reply to To Touch or Not to Touch

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To Touch or Not to Touch

by James R Linn In reply to To Touch or Not to Touch

Yes Touch!

I worked with a team that did employee self service kiosks for thousands of non computer literate users with Kiosks located on manufacturing floor space etc.

First off you should really limit the number of times any data is keyed in-by presenting as many yes/no choices, or pick lists as possible. Its definately easier for computer illiterates to touch their way through choices rather than type.

On screen keyboards for the times when they must key data work fine. Make the keys big and remember the challenge of height(if you have a 7' person calibrate on touch,, it will make a big difference in the error rate for a 5 foot person).

If you can eliminate the external keyboards, do it. They are failure prone, abuse magnets.

James

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by Sheryl V In reply to To Touch or Not to Touch

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To Touch or Not to Touch

by timwalsh In reply to To Touch or Not to Touch

In my mind it comes down to usability.

If the software has been / can be written such that the entire transaction can be accomplished by an employee pushing a series of buttons on the screen, I would go solely with a touch-screen.

If the application requires that any information be typed, obviously a keyboard/mouse combination would be required.

What are the vendors reasons behind their recommendation? It may be an issue of using an off-the-shelf software application requiring keyboard/mouse usage vs. needing a specially developed application to use a touch-screen. I would ask.

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To Touch or Not to Touch

by Sheryl V In reply to To Touch or Not to Touch

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