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Too much critisism.

By Zulj ·
I have enjoyed over a year working for my current company, and have built up excellent relations with almost all the staff here. I am the soul IT technician/administrator, but because of the small number of users (<100) I get tasked to many different projects. However, in the last month I have got nothing but critisism from my boss, who before that was my strongest supporter to give me a decent raise.

I also have a reputation of been able to handle critisism better than anyone else in the company, (I've been in IT support for 5 years now) but I feel now that it getting abit much. Absolutely everything I do, no matter how good or bad, I get flak for it. And it's not even constructive critisism. It's as if every time he sees me working on something, he has to try an belittle my work.

Now I believe that I'm a scape goat for something thats bothering him, and that I'm getting blasted 'cos he thinks I can handle it. But I could be wrong.

Does anyone have any advice for me? Should I speak to him about it, or wait it out. And if I do go speak to him, how should I approach the matter?

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By all means, discuss it!

by Cactus Pete In reply to Too much critisism.

It is in your interest to bring this up. It's almost as if you've got to manage your boss here.

You can say, "I would like to set aside a time to speak with you about my job performance. I think the feedback I'm getting shows that I'm not meeting your expectations, and I would like to discuss ideas for getting me on track with your goals for me."

It's honest, and it's good for the company. It doesn't accuse your boss of anything, and it shows a concern for the situation. I think you're mostly there already.

It's a scary thing to do, obviously, but you need to confront [in a kind manner] your boss since he is not giving you the solution you need.

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Some Suggestions

by maxwell edison In reply to Too much critisism.

Keep a journal of what you're asked to do and by whom. Write down the what's, when's, why's, and so on - and especially the outcome. It doesn't have to be a lengthy entry, but rather a few notes that outline a particular request. This will be helpful when performance review time comes around. Moreover, it may show that the criticism is unjustified. (On the other hand, it may show areas where you really need to improve.)

Try to turn the criticism lemon into lemonaide. Maintain a friendly and professional attitude, and ask your boss to make suggestions on how you might handle that particular situation better. If you find that you are (or were) wrong about something, admit it and move on by learning from the experience.

Do a Google or Yahoo search for "How to handle criticism", and you'll get loads of hits from a variety of sources. You'll get some ideas of how to personally fend it off, how to approach your boss, how to keep a positive atitude about it, and so on.

Some examples:

http://tinyurl.com/j8mz

http://tinyurl.com/j8mc

http://tinyurl.com/j8mg

http://tinyurl.com/j8mp

(I could have posted dozens of links)

But whatever you do, try to correct the situation. It wouldn't be to anyone's advantage to let it fester until it blows up into something really big.

Best of luck.

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Start Looking For Another Job

by JackOfAllTech In reply to Too much critisism.

I was at one company for 16 years with mostly rave reviews. Then, my last year, it seemed to me they were making up things to criticize me about. After a very bad review that I protested, I was put on a probation period. Even though I satisfied all their requirements, they wrote up a document with all kinds of other things I should have done. Since I had no proof they were able to fire me. Don't wait for ulcers, start looking for a new job now.

Ralph

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Make him put up or shut up.

by Mike@MRI In reply to Too much critisism.

What I would do is ask him for a reference. Make him put down on paper exactly what he thinks of you. If he asks why you want one, simply tell him that it is for future reference and that you do not have any other motive for doing so, you are not looking for any other jobs, but you want a reference on file because you are updating your CV. When you receive the reference, if it is bad you can question it and argue your corner, and if it is good then just ask him why he is being so negative about you usually. Also, when he gives you the reference it will make him think about how he really feels about you and the quality of your work, and it might stop all the pettyness.

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I think...

by kiddanger In reply to Too much critisism.

...the first suggestion from dpetak was the best one. However, you were not given a suggestion of what to do if you're boss continues to be unreasonable or refuses to discuss it. You can only reason with reasonable people.

I went through a similar incident and it is very frustrating. If your boss continues to give you grief, you need to right down the issues you're having and visit HR. Yes, it will make it into more of an issue but it documents your concerns. Someone also suggested documenting everything you do, which should be done even if you're having good relations because, as they said, review time is important.

Confronting your boss should not be done however, HR may want to talk to both of you together. If that makes you uncomfortable, suggest upfront that you'd rather deal directly through HR alone. Also, get your resume ready. Your boss could just be having personal issues or grief from his boss. Worse it could be professional jealousy, which is what I experienced but know this... Seldom will you win in a contest against your boss. It's not worth trying unless it's a legal issue.

The bottom line is, if you want to stay, you'll have to work it out. If it's not worth it, move on and try to get a favorable review, IN WRITING, before you leave. Handing a copy of a review to a recruiter or your next potential employer is critical in case your boss later tries to state otherwise. It could also help you in case you wish to pursue legal action in case he does. Yes, it sounds ridiculous but isn't it ridiculous now?

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