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upgrading a pc

By kikabi01 ·
What factors should one put in consideration before one upgrades a computer?

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upgrading a pc

by ysleau In reply to upgrading a pc

Upgrade Factors :

1.Usage of the PC
2.Budget of new PC
3.Software /devices' drivers compatibility
4.Performance Expectation of PC

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upgrading a pc

by opatzg In reply to upgrading a pc

1) What shortcomings does your current machine have that makes you want an upgrade?
2) Upgrade or replace the entire system?
3) What operating system do you currently use and do you wish to continue doing so?
4) How much do you want to spend?
5)How much use did the current machine already have? Are there salvageable parts? Hopefully its at least an atx case with floppy and dvd 12-16x, or has a fast cdburner. Otherwise package deals with new monitors with new operating systems are tough to beat proce wise even assembling it all yourself and it arrives working. You could always sell your current machine for a couple hundred to someone going off to college or give it as a gift to a needy person of your choice and then replace with bigger/better. Or do you want a backup pc if the new one goes down?

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upgrading a pc

by nccorthu In reply to upgrading a pc

Also
1. Is your hardware Compatible? If some is not are you prepared to replace it. I assume you have the drivers for the new OS available.

2. Is the system good enough and fast enough to handle the new OS and provide decent service.
While a 300 Mhz machine might run XP and it can be done, the thing will really not be worth it. It will just run sluggish. Non one needs a good XP crash. It will fix itself better but if it does a real dump you will really feel badly.

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upgrading a pc

by TheChas In reply to upgrading a pc

Cost of the upgrades versus the cost of a new PC is my primary consideration.

You could also look at the value of the PC on the used market, and set the value as the maximum amount to spend for upgrades.

Generally speaking, if only 1 or 2 items need to be changed it is worth upgrading.

Any more, and the cost of a minor upgrade gets to be too high.

Even a motherboard swap can be hard to justify versus building up a whole new PC.

Then, after the economics, the performance increase may not be what you expect.

CPU speed upgrades are not very cost effective.
Doubling the CPU speed usually results in less than a 25% performance increase.

Older motherboards can have problems recognizing new RAM and hard drives.

Some upgrades WILL require a new power supply.

Chas

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upgrading a pc

by Aaelwyn In reply to upgrading a pc

1. What is the role of the computer? is it for personal home use, business? network? etc. This could influence the type of hardware you require.

2. which items are being replaced? will they work with the items remaining? ie. a geforce 4 with an 8x agp will not work in a mobo supplying a 2x agp port.

3. how much ram do you require? do you have enough slots and is it compatible ram? ex PC2700 DDR with a 333mhz bus will not work or fit in a board that uses SDRAM only or boards with two RAM type combos may not allow for the higher bus speed in the PC2700 etc. avoid boards with options for two different RAM types, also, if you want 2gigs, make sure the board will take 2 gigs.

4. CPU - different CPU's use different kinds of slots, make sure they match. AMD XP series i think all use Socket A. also, the the mobo must support the type of CPU and bus speed that comes with it.

5. Harddrives - do you require SCSI? if so, you need the proper mobo for the the job or controller cards. doyou need RAID? get a RAID board, the RAID clones are horrendously unstable.

6. Sound? avoid onboard, anything else should be fine.

(continued)

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upgrading a pc

by Aaelwyn In reply to upgrading a pc

1. What is the role of the computer? is it for personal home use, business? network? etc. This could influence the type of hardware you require.

2. which items are being replaced? will they work with the items remaining? ie. a geforce 4 with an 8x agp will not work in a mobo supplying a 2x agp port.

3. how much ram do you require? do you have enough slots and is it compatible ram? ex PC2700 DDR with a 333mhz bus will not work or fit in a board that uses SDRAM only or boards with two RAM type combos may not allow for the higher bus speed in the PC2700 etc. avoid boards with options for two different RAM types, also, if you want 2gigs, make sure the board will take 2 gigs.

4. CPU - different CPU's use different kinds of slots, make sure they match. AMD XP series i think all use Socket A. also, the the mobo must support the type of CPU and bus speed that comes with it.

5. Harddrives - do you require SCSI? if so, you need the proper mobo for the the job or controller cards. doyou need RAID? get a RAID board, the RAID clones are horrendously unstable.

6. Sound? avoid onboard, anything else should be fine.

(continued)

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upgrading a pc

by Aaelwyn In reply to upgrading a pc

oops, seem to have a lot of problems on these boards once i hit Submit, anyway

7. slots - how many of each slot do you need ie.
RAM slots
AGP slots
PCI slots
ISA slots (for older legacy cards)
USB ports can have up to 6 physical ports

8. Cooling - newer machines require much more cooling. not only does the CPU need adequate cooling, but DDR Ram, 7200rpm and SCSI drives need cooling, actually just about everything needs cooling these days and there are fans specific to every device inyour box, but most importantly, the case needs to bring cool air from one point and should pass over the general inside and exiting from the opposite end. Cooling should be taken seriously. also, round IDE cables help

9. Power supply - if you plan on having 4 IDE devices installed as well as extra case fans, a powerful vid card, cpu, etc. don't go below a single 450watt PS. and make sure you have enough connections on it to support your hardware.

10. should be standard these days, but make your EPROM is flashable (the BIOS brain). as well, the video card ROM should be flashable. again, standard these days.

11. IMHO - If you want personal box for graphics intense games as well as other home stuff, i would go with AMD XP series of CPU's over P4's. The reason being, AMD uses a shorter pipeline in the cpu allowing for broken data streams to be analyzed and re-sent much faster than the long slow pipeline in P4's. This means, faster performance in aboslutely everything except AdobePhotoshop which seems to be faster on a P4. also an AMD XP 2400 (2 gigahertz) out performs P4 2.5ghz, though they do run slightly hotter.

anyway, my opinions and suggestions, good luck

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