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WAN design

By ehuebia ·
Hi,

I am a 3rd year university student majoring in Networking and Telecommunications.

For one of my networking courses we are to develop a WAN solution for a ficticious company. For our project we pretend to be a networking consultant group. We are to respond to an RFP with a proper WAN solution connecting seven cities (headquarters in Toronto) across Canada.

Here are some of the particulars of PHASE 1:

? Each city requiring bandwidths ranging from 704 Kbps to 3960 Kbps

? Voice channels per cities range from 3 to 15

? No video traffic needed at this time, but have the scalability and room for expansion in all areas

? The response should Include WAN connectivity methods, services, and equipment


As you know there are several options, but our original preference was ATM because of its scalability and robustness. However, after thinking about it some more, we realized ATM may not be the best solution right now as it is a lot more expensive than the other methods (i.e. Frame Relay, XDSL, VPN). So, in light this, we were thinking to implement Frame Relay first, and then after 3 years or so upgrade to ATM or MPLS.

So, my questions are:

1 Is our WAN solution good, or is there a better solution?
2 As the networking consultants, is this our job to talk to the telcos and negotiate pricing?
3 After deciding the connectivity method, will the client have to provide the necessary equipment or will the telcos provide them? (ie, if we were to go with ATM, would the client purchase the ATM switches, multiplexers, CSU/DSU)
3 If we go with FR and then decide to upgrade to a more scalable method, approx. how long will it be to upgrade, and will there be a lot of equipment changes and business disruptions?

Any help to our project would be fabulous! I am sincerely looking forward to your assistance.


E

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by Jim_MacLachlan In reply to WAN design

I'm no expert at this, but I've heard for voice you really want Point to Point (Lease) lines connecting offices when you have voice over the lines for quality. Otherwise, your packets are subject to other traffic delays.

I would not suggest using a VPN as there is a lot of overhead there with the encryption which would add to delays & reduction of voice quality, I would think. Besides, you'd need redundancy of big boxes & I'd think it would be expensive.

Check into a company called DataPoint, Inc. They deliver ethernet to your office instead of a T1. The advantage there is the initial provisioning of their line can be as low as a 2mb connection & can go up to 10mb with a phone call & 1 day turn around. No need to provision additional lines as your bandwidth expands, so it is faster.

Your scope of work should tell you what you need to look into, but I would say yes to all your questions on what you should do. Costs & types of those equipment & providers all help make your decisions. If you'll need to rip out a router if you need to expand, that makes a difference, depending on how soon the customer sees the need. If it is 6 months from now, that information is really important. If it is 3 years down the road, it might not be too important.

As for negotiating pricing - be careful. I wouldn't worry about digging down for a rock bottom price since any quote is only good for a short period, usually 30 days, & until something is signed, it isn't worth spit. What I really hate is when a vendor gives me a price & then it turns out to be low. I'd rather have a higher figure & have the final product come in under. Generally, I have to sell a solution to management, get the money & then implement it. If I have slightly higher prices, it makes padding the project budget for problems easier - always put extra in for problems because you always have them. I've yet to see anything come in on time & under budget, especially when dealing with Telcos.

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by Jim.Coyne In reply to WAN design

I would go with point to point frame relay and Cisco routers. Although I like the idea of using a solution like DataPoint, I think that if you do a cost analysis, you will find the frame solution is the most cost effective. One point on the frame is to make sure that your CIR is large enough to handle all of the required voice calls. Use the routers to mark non-essential traffic with DE bits if you go over the CIR and setup AutoQOS - VOIP (see link below) If the company wants to add video to the links you would need to adjust bandwidth and look into custom queuing. (see link below) Depending on your service provider, upgrading bandwidth should be relatively painless and custom queues could be implemented over night. Email me if you need help with the router configurations:
Jim.Coyne@gmail.com

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/iosswrel/ps1839/products_feature_guide09186a0080500b8f.html

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/iosswrel/ps1835/products_configuration_guide_chapter09186a00800b75ac.html

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by Jim.Coyne In reply to WAN design

I would go with point to point frame relay and Cisco routers. Although I like the idea of using a solution like DataPoint, I think that if you do a cost analysis, you will find the frame solution is the most cost effective. One point on the frame is to make sure that your CIR is large enough to handle all of the required voice calls. Use the routers to mark non-essential traffic with DE bits if you go over the CIR and setup AutoQOS - VOIP (see link below) If the company wants to add video to the links you would need to adjust bandwidth and look into custom queuing. (see link below) Depending on your service provider, upgrading bandwidth should be relatively painless and custom queues could be implemented over night. Email me if you need help with the router configurations:
Jim.Coyne@gmail.com

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/iosswrel/ps1839/products_feature_guide09186a0080500b8f.html

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/iosswrel/ps1835/products_configuration_guide_chapter09186a00800b75ac.html

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by jrmoores In reply to WAN design

Hi,

1. Wan solution is perfect
2. Depends on the company, larger companies will have a purchase department that deals with the telcos, smaller companies will have the network folks deal with the telcos for pricing.
3. If you pay for a managed service the telcos will deal with the equipment but this will increase your costs and take some of the control out of your hands so most companies with any knowledge will opt to do the equipment themselves. Which means the telcos will install a cable and you will buy the equipment it plugs into.
4.Frame is very scalable, but if you did want to upgrade them you would need new circuits which a are typically 6 to 8 weeks and then you would need new equipment to terminate the circuits, or at least different cards within the router to terminate the circuit.

Hope this helps :)

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