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  • #4108533

    What are the 3 basic website structures?

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    by mindmadetechnologies ·

    Hi guyz,
    What are the 3 basic website structures?

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    • #4108624
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      Re: 3 basic website structures

      by kees_b ·

      In reply to What are the 3 basic website structures?

      That’s a question only the person who says so can answer. So ask them.

    • #4110030

      Reply To: What are the 3 basic website structures?

      by simbacker3 ·

      In reply to What are the 3 basic website structures?

      three basic website structures are as under:

      Linear Structure: All website content is presented on a single page, allowing users to scroll vertically to navigate through the content.

      Hierarchical Structure: Content is organized in a hierarchical manner with multiple levels of navigation. Users start from a homepage and can navigate to different sections and sub-sections.

      Sequential Structure: Users progress through the website in a predefined order, with each page or section linked to the next one, creating a linear flow.

      Note: URL of example site removed by moderator.

      • This reply was modified 11 months, 3 weeks ago by simbacker3.
      • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by Avatar photokees_b.
    • #4113858

      Reply To: What are the 3 basic website structures?

      by wpminds ·

      In reply to What are the 3 basic website structures?

      Linear Structure: A linear or sequential structure is the simplest and most straightforward website structure. It follows a linear progression, where each web page is linked to the next page in a predetermined order. Users navigate through the website by following a predefined path, typically through a series of “Next” or “Previous” buttons. This structure is commonly used for tutorials, storytelling websites, or step-by-step guides.

      Hierarchical Structure: A hierarchical structure organizes web pages in a hierarchical or tree-like fashion. It consists of a main homepage, which serves as the top-level page, with subpages or sections branching off from it. Each subpage may have its own subpages, creating a hierarchical structure. Users can navigate through the website by clicking on menu items or links that lead them deeper into the website’s content. This structure is commonly used for websites with clear categories and subcategories, such as e-commerce websites or news portals.

      Webbed Structure: A webbed structure, also known as a network or interconnected structure, allows for non-linear navigation and interlinking between web pages. It does not follow a strict hierarchical order, and pages are connected to each other through hyperlinks. Users can move between pages by clicking on relevant links within the content, which may lead to related topics or associated information. This structure is often used for websites with a large amount of interconnected content, such as blogs or informational websites.

      It’s important to note that modern websites often combine elements from these basic structures to create more complex and dynamic website architectures. Additionally, advancements in web design and technology have led to the emergence of other structures, such as grid-based layouts or single-page applications (SPAs), which offer different approaches to organizing and presenting website content.

      • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by wpminds.
      • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by Avatar photokees_b.
      • #4115562

        Reply To: What are the 3 basic website structures?

        by TechsTitans ·

        In reply to Reply To: What are the 3 basic website structures?

        The three basic website structures are:

        Hierarchical Structure: This structure is also known as a tree structure, where the homepage is at the top, and the subsequent pages are organized in a hierarchical manner. This structure is commonly used for websites with a lot of content, such as e-commerce sites or news.

        Sequential Structure: This structure is also known as a linear structure, where the pages are organized in sequential order. This structure is commonly used for websites that have a specific flow, such as tutorials or step-by-step guides.

        Matrix Structure: This structure is also known as a grid structure, where the pages are organized in a grid-like pattern. This structure is commonly used for websites that have a lot of content that can be categorized in multiple ways, such as a directory or a portfolio website.

        It’s important to note that these structures can be combined or modified to fit the specific needs of a website.

        • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by TechsTitans.
        • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by TechsTitans.
        • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by Avatar photokees_b.
    • #4115802

      Reply To: What are the 3 basic website structures?

      by pattersonshaun663 ·

      In reply to What are the 3 basic website structures?

      The three basic website structures are:

      1. Linear Structure: Also known as the “one-page” structure, this design follows a linear flow where all the content is presented on a single page. Users scroll down to access different sections of the website. It is suitable for small websites or landing pages with concise information.

      2. Hierarchical Structure: This structure organizes content in a hierarchical manner, with a main homepage that branches out into different categories or sections. Each section may have subpages, creating a tree-like structure. It is commonly used for websites with a large amount of content and helps users navigate through different levels of information.

      3. Webbed Structure: Also referred to as the “network” structure, this design connects various pages through hyperlinks without a strict hierarchical order. Users can navigate between different pages or sections of the website in a non-linear manner. It is often used for websites that aim to provide multiple pathways for exploration and offer a more interconnected browsing experience.

      These structures can be combined or modified based on specific website requirements and content organization needs.

      • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by pattersonshaun663.
      • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by Avatar photokees_b.
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