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what is refresh frequency

By RG11 ·
What does the refresh frequency display setting do? NT 4.0

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by LCM Man In reply to what is refresh frequency

It is the refresh rate for your video card and/or monitor. Some video drivers for Windows NT may not support the Refresh Frequency box feature on the Settings tab in the Display Properties dialog box. However, you can control this setting using a Windows NT registry value. See Q216166 in the Microsoft Knowledgebase for further details.

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by RG11 In reply to what is refresh frequency

How do I determine what the proper setting is for this?

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by sgt_shultz In reply to what is refresh frequency

pretty sure that is the frequency with which the ion gun paints the crt...it kinda goes away with lcd monitors, doesn't it? we need the chas here...
anyhow, if the card displays ok from the monitor you are using, you got the refresh rate set ok. you can overdrive the monitor and damage it if it is not rated high enough for rate at which video card is trying to drive it. but you get obvious garbaged displays when that happens and was only issue on older monitors.
you can fine tune the refresh rate a little if you are in an environment with florescent lights which may 'beat' with the video refresh rate some users see it some don't. good explanation i am guessing to be found at ati website...

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by TheChas In reply to what is refresh frequency

In relation to video, the refresh frequency is how often the image on the display is written (refreshed).

The "correct" refresh rate depends on your video card, monitor and resolution settings.

If you have the manufactures driver for both the video card and monitor installed, Windows should set the "optimum" refresh rate on it's own.

There are only 2 situations where you may need to change the refresh rate:

Sometimes when you have no display, it means that the refresh rate has been set to a value that the monitor does not support.

Secondly, if you see too much screen flicker, you may want a higher refresh rate.

The scan rate is the rate for how quickly the electron beam traverses across the screen.
Scan rates are in the 15,000 to 25,000 hertz range.

You still have a refresh rate for a LCD monitor.

Chas

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by semmelbroesel In reply to what is refresh frequency

Most LCD monitors I have checked use 60Hz, that is 60 complete picture refreshes per second.
On a regular monitor, 60Hz shows a slight flickering. You will start seeing a lot less flickering after 72 or 75 Hz, and I like to use 85Hz a lot.
If your monitor is very old, be careful with these settings.
I don't remember if NT offers this - if you change the refresh rate, it should give you a 15 second test mode during which it switches the refresh rate. If you do not see anything, just wait for 15 seconds, and it should go back to the original state. BUT if NT does NOT have this option, then you could be in trouble if the refresh rate is too high.
Anyone else know if NT 4 supports this?

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by stinor In reply to what is refresh frequency

Your description is a bit short, but I quess as everyone else here, that we are talking about
"screen refresh rate" (SRR).

the SRR is the times your screen is redrawn/sec, the higher the number the more "stable"/"calm" your screen will apear.

On almost all system it will default to 60 hrz, which is always too slow!

I don't think you will find a monitor today that don't support 75 hrz in 1024*768.

as a rule, the higher the resolution of your screen, the lower the SRR you can use.

If you have a monitor that is more than ~7 years old, you might get into trouble if you try to make the SRR higher than the monitor can handle, but almost every monitor you can buy has a built in protection if you try to enter a too high SRR

I suggest that you try to put the SRR to atleast 72 hrz, and if it works and you have the option for higher SRR try 80 hrz. the visible area on your monitor might change when you do this, in order to fix this you'll will have to go into the menu on your monitor and adjust the borders...

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