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What is Virtualisation?

By VAR1016 ·
I was recommended to download VMWare, which I did. I subsequently uninstalled it because it doesn't tell me what it is - at least not in any way that I can recognise/understand. They keep sending me nice emails hoping I'm getting on with it (VM converter, virtual server etc.) and I thought I would try to find out something.

I looked up Wikipedia and got this page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtualisation. This tells me zero - just a lot of choices I do not recognise/understand except disk partitioning, which I do not understand but at least know how to use!

How can a computer be "virtual"? Either it's there or it isn't. Something has to work the numbers and store the stuff and so on.

Can anyone point me to a site that explains this in normal language?

Thanks

Paul

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I will try to keep it simple

by Jacky Howe In reply to What is Virtualisation?

Full virtualization, in computer science, is a virtualization technique used to implement a certain kind of virtual machine environment: one that provides a complete simulation of the underlying hardware. The result is a system in which all software capable of execution on the raw hardware can be run in the virtual machine. In particular, this includes all operating systems.
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It simply means that you can create an environment that is similar to useing your normal PC. It is a PC within a PC. This is created by creating a Virtual PC (Machine) which really is a file on your Hard Drive that acts like a hard Drive and you can install an Operating System to that File (Machine). You run it in a Virtual environment. I have found that Virtual PC 2007 is easier to use than VMWare. Useing Remote Access is similar as you are controlling another PC from the PC.
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Scandisk

by VAR1016 In reply to Remember this

I don't see the connexion here, but this is interesting: is Scandisk running in XP there? I ask because I do not appear to have Scandisk on my computers.

And how do you post a picture on this forum?

Best

Paul

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In XP, it's called.....

by ThumbsUp2 In reply to Scandisk

... Error Checking. If you right click drive C and choose properties, then go to the tools tab, you'll see it there.

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Sorry about that

by Jacky Howe In reply to Scandisk

I thought that everyone had used Windows 98. That photo is of my XP PC running Windows 98 in a Virtual PC. A lot of the old timers here would be familiar with that screen.
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What you are refering to is Dual Booting using two Physical Hard Drives or Partitions.
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Win 98

by VAR1016 In reply to Sorry about that

Hello.

I started with Windows 3.1. My first computer had, I think Win 95. I still have a Win 98 installation disk but couldn't remember what it looked like!

Paul

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Basically Virtualiztion is

by California Dead Head In reply to What is Virtualisation?

Virtualization is taking a single computer (the hardware)and installing more than 1 copy of an operating. So let's say I have only 1 server and want to run a web server and an email server. I can install VMware and then running that program can put in say the Linux install disk and install Linux "Virtually" and then name the install Virtual1 for example and then install Microsoft Exchange on a different virtual server. So 1 computer can run both Linux and Windows and be a web server and a email server. The 2 virtual servers are managed by the VM ware software. Normally you could never install Linux and Exchange on a single computer. For a PC you could install XP and Vista and Apple OS on a single computer so you can run XP and Vista at the same time and switch with just a keystroke. You need alot of RAM though.

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I am sorry to say...

by VAR1016 In reply to What is Virtualisation?

Thanks Rob and Mr Dead Head for your trouble in trying to answer my question. But I still don't understand this.

A while ago, I ran XP Pro and XP home on partitions on the same computer. Now I do not see that this was virtual: they were "there"! I could choose Pro or Home, just as I can now choose either of my computers via Remote Desktop, or as I can choose, Firefox, IE or Chrome, Word or Excel.

I cannot see how this is "virtual"!

Thanks again,

Paul

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The difference is.....

by ThumbsUp2 In reply to I am sorry to say...

The way you had XP Pro/Home previously was called dual boot. You could select which OS to boot into. But, you could only access one at a time without a reboot. Virtualization creates a "virtual" place within one OS where you can play all you want to play, then turn it off when you're done. No reboot is necessary.

Think of it this way. You can put on one pair of glasses and see the world as it really is. Or, you can put on a pair of virtual goggles and see the world how you (or the programmer) want it to be.

What you see in a virtual world isn't real. It's a simulation. So, you can do anything you want to do without hurting any body or any thing.

What you see in a virtual PC isn't real. It's a simulation. So, you can do anything you want to do if the OS will allow it. If you hurt any thing, so what. You simply **** away the virtual PC and start a new one.

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One question answered!

by VAR1016 In reply to The difference is.....

Thank you,

I had got the idea that if I had two operating systems on partitions, this was virtual; obviously not.

I still don't understand this though - I cannot understand how something can be "there" but isn't!

Sorry to be so thick, but this abstract stuff is very puzzling.

Paul

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