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Why am I paying for antivirus, if I have to manually remove viruses?

By MiraMira1973 ·
I get the fact that there are more viruses introduced everyday than there are remedies and preventative measures.... But for a NON-TECHIE who simply wants to have a computer at home for personal use, why is it so damn difficult to get rid of a virus? I don't visit porn-sites, don't do any online shopping (eBay with paypal maybe 3x a year). I do facebook a couple times a week, but don't download apps or accept strangers as my friends, I never open attachments in chain emails, and I have Norton 360 which is supposed to be protecting me from the incidental stuff, and intrusions etc... So why do I have unresolved security risks on my computer that require manual removal? I don't know the first thing about any of that techie stuff, I am scared to death of messing things up worse, and I have a trustworthy place I can PAY to fix it, but why should I have to?

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Why should you have to?

by santeewelding In reply to Why am I paying for antiv ...

Like you said. You are a NON-TECHIE, and, apparently proud of it.

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Why?

by seanferd In reply to Why am I paying for antiv ...

Well, there are sort of two answers. The first answer is: you don't have to pay. Use a free AV solution.

The second answer is that AV can't stop everything, but I do know malware removal is a pain, even if you are in it for the sport. A good adjunct (free) program is MBAM
http://malwarebytes.org (although you can purchase a premium version as well). It frequently finds things or removes things other AV solution do not. I've even seen my AV (Symantec Corporate) pick up on items only during an MBAM scan (which is sort of funny to watch.

But, although you do practice safer surfing habits, it doesn't matter so much. Major sites are altered or infected frequently. If you are on cable internet, without a good firewall, your neighbors might infect your system.

The number one reason, though, that people have hard-to-remove infections is because they surf the internet using the Administrator account. Limited user accounts make it more difficult for malware to infect the system, and then the malware is limited only to that user account.

From a personal perspective, I've never been impresses with any home user version of Symantec "Norton" security products, although I liked their other utilities rather well. McAfee I like even less, and Trend Micro seems to have followed both of them down the same hole. In general, I don't like security software built into "suites" either, but YMMV.

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RE:

by NexS In reply to Why?

<i>"The number one reason, though, that people have hard-to-remove infections is because they surf the internet using the Administrator account. Limited user accounts make it more difficult for malware to infect the system, and then the malware is limited only to that user account"</i>

This is a very good point. A point that I've overlooked, myself. I suppose those annoying Windows(vista&7) "Do you want to do this?", then "Are you sure you want to?", then "Are you REALLY sure and certain that you truly want to open this folder?" situation had a purpose. Right?
Right.

:)

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Yeah

by seanferd In reply to RE:

Although from what I've experienced and heard, the Vista prompt was a bit over the top. "I already said yes!"

I have similar behavior in XP with a "program guard" type of security software installed (Online Armor free firewall). Although I do wish the functionality weren't bundled so, unless maybe it is saving a lot of system overhead.

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I've thought about this

by santeewelding In reply to Yeah

I get it with my other machine, Vista Basic, and somewhat more strongly so with W7.

I run both, and profigately so, in Administrator mode.

I am only comfortable when I think that, not only I, but that with anything else, the advisory will crop up when anything else wants to run.

Not so?

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I'm not entirely sure.

by seanferd In reply to I've thought about this

I would assume you'd get a UAC prompt while using the Admin account, and you seem to indicate that you do. The problem is that when malware does get in, it has a lot more power under the Admin account, and can more easily escalate to having System privileges.

I'm not well-versed enough in Vista or 7 to really say. I only do a little support here and there for 7 and Vista, and I hadn't purchased a copy of 7 after the beta/rc releases died.

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