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    Why I Don’t Blog

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    by charliespencer ·

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    • #3131898

      Why I Don’t Blog

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      Lack of material is the first reason. I work in a manufacturing plant
      in the southeastern U.S. The majority of our manufacturing employees
      have limited computer experience or training. Most of the questions I
      get asked during the day are relatively simple questions with answers
      that wouldn’t be of interest to anybody who’s been doing tech support
      for more than three months. I don’t think the web needs another site on
      the subject of “Stupid User Tricks”.

      Lack of specific knowledge in depth is another. We’ve got experts in
      lots of disciplines at our IT headquarters. I’ve spent my career as a
      generalist at a remote site. I don’t consider myself a subject matter
      expert on too much besides the care and feeding of the average Windows
      end user.

      I don’t want to take the time to do it right. I’m something of a
      stickler for details and verbal accuracy. I feel it would take longer
      to get my facts straight and express them clearly than it would really
      be worth.

      Opportunity costs are also a consideration. I already feel a bit guilty
      about the time I spend on this site while at work, but I can justify it
      to myself as professional interaction. I don’t feel the same about
      original authorship on company time, and I’m not going to do it on my
      time at the house.

      I don’t have any motivation to start a blog. I can’t believe anyone
      would be interested in my rantings. I’m always surprised when I get a
      response to a posting here. I don’t see any reason to try to compete
      with other blogs for a share of the reader pool; there are better
      authors than I. If no one else is going to read it, why am I writing
      it? I occasionally benefit from writing ideas down so I can brainstorm
      them, but I don’t feel the need to do that in a public forum.

      There are people who start blogs because it’s the cool new thing to do,
      just like vanity web sites were a decade ago. Feelings, personal
      activities, family stories? I’ll keep them to myself and out of the
      media, thank you, and I wish others would do the same. Nobody gives a
      rat’s fanny about your Aunt Mabel’s hip surgery.

      —Heck, I didn’t even create the above text fresh for this blog. I
      copied it from a comment I posted to an earlier discussion.—
      —Then I had to go back and edit the sentence above for clarity based on master3bs’ comments below.—

      • #3132449

        Why I Don’t Blog

        by tejaaa ·

        In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

        Hey Buddy,
                        
        The good news is I read your rant and i am happyily commenting here.
        Initially I thought I will link this post on my blog, but then I
        thought of just putting a comment here ( I am not sure if you would
        bother tracking your post).

        Now I don’t think blogging is all about ranting about one’s personal
        life. I maintain few blogs and I only occassionaly write about personal
        stuff on them. My main blogs include http://www.itejas.com & http://www.softwareandtools.com
        . And you don’t have to create your own specialised stuff as well. You
        could write or link to others good IT related articles that you find.
        Ah, your blog does not even have to be an IT Blog. It can be about
        fishing, walking or whatever else you like talking about (remember,
        they can still be away from your personal life).

        As you know, there are millions of blogs on the Internet, but almost
        all have something to give to their readers. You could even create a
        blog where you write about the IT Problems you have faced in the
        company and what steps you did to troubleshoot. I am sure many of us
        would be facing the same problems as you did and then we have a place
        to refer instead of keep on troubleshooting. You can make your company
        users read it before they approach you (kind of FAQ’s).
        Time is something that you have to manage, but by the looks of it, you
        must be doing a fair bit of online readying anyway. Start writing about
        something that you are really passionate about or something that you
        really hate but want to explore that subject. This will keep you
        motivated :).

        You can contact me if you want more motivation on starting a blog.

      • #3132262

        Why I Don’t Blog

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

        I replied to tejaaa via a TR private message, not because any of the
        content was private, but to be sure he received it without having to go
        looking for it.  Since he did make his comments in a public forum,
        I felt it appropriate to also respond here.  Here’s the content of
        that message:

        Thanks for your response.  As I noted, I’m astonished anyone would wade through all that bilge, much less comment on it.

        “And you don’t have to create your own specialised stuff as well. You
        could write or link to others good IT related articles that you
        find.”  I don’t get the point of having links to other articles in
        a blog.  I get annoyed when I Google a subject and three-quarters
        of the results are blog postings pointing to the remaining
        quarter.  If I want to go back to an article later, I create a
        favorite / bookmark.  If I want to comment on an article, I do it
        on the article’s site.  More of the article’s readers will see
        it  there, and I’m more likely to get a response from the
        author.  Using a blog to comment on an author’s content strikes me
        as a way of trying to get the last word.

        “It can be about fishing, walking or whatever else you like talking
        about … Start writing about something that you are really passionate
        about ..”  I’d rather be fishing, walking, or whatever I’m
        passionate about(gardening, reading, and watching stock car races) than
        blogging about it.

        “there are millions of blogs on the Internet, but almost all have
        something to give to their readers.”  Most of the non-technical
        blogs I’ve read seem to have more to offer the AUTHOR than the
        READER.  Maybe I’m just too uncaring to be interested in reading
        someone else’s musings on fishing, walking, gardening, reading, racing,
        or whatever.  Maybe I’m just not interested in wading through all
        the various opinions when I could be doing something else.

        “You could even create a blog where you write about the IT Problems you
        have faced in the company and what steps you did to
        troubleshoot.”  As I noted, most of the problems I deal with are
        elementary stuff.  Many of the rest are solved after searching the
        web for solutions.  Why duplicate what’s already out there,
        clogging the search results for others?

        “You can make your company users read it before they approach you (kind
        of FAQ’s).”  We can’t get users to read the FAQ’s, “How To’s”, or
        other forms of on-line already available; they won’t even click Help on
        a menu.  This may be due to poor web site design on our part, or
        that it’s easier for end users to call for help than to search for
        it.  Besides, if they start solving their own problems, what do I
        do 🙂  I’ll make you a deal: if you can tell me how to
        successfully get end users to use on-line help, I’ll be happy to post a
        blog entry here describing the method and giving you full credit for
        the idea.

        Blogging isn’t like writing a term paper or working out.  I don’t
        need motivation since absolutely nothing depends on my doing it. 
        I posted the initial entry only because I got tired of being asked
        “Where’s your blog?”  Okay, now I’ve got one.  Maybe I just
        express myself better in individual conversations than untargeted
        broadcasts.  I’ll be happy to converse with you (or anyone) via
        e-mail, but please, don’t waste your time checking back on the blog.

      • #3132261

        Why I Don’t Blog

        by illilli ·

        In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

        Hey buddy, now you got another person reading your blog…WOOT!

        I think bloging is about saying what you feel, when you feel it.  I really enjoyed reading about how you felt about blogs because now, I know a little more about you.  If you were to post an article about something, I might check out your blog and then see what kind of a person you are.

        I blog to release tension truely.  I think it is therapuetic (spelling?).  I don’t care if anyone else reads it or not.  I read my own words every once in a while and I either laugh because I think I am funny (which is probably debatable), or I relive how I was feeling when I wrote it.  It’s just for me, but I have shared it with you….just in case you want to know what I think or how I feel.  You might read my blog and decide you don’t like me also.  In that case, you’ve learned something too.

      • #3132241

        Why I Don’t Blog

        by master3bs ·

        In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

        What is ironic is how many people have already read this blog that you
        didn’t write.  (If nothing else you are at least responsible for
        the
        —Heck, I didn’t even create the above text for this blog.  I copied it from an earlier discussion.— portion of the blog.

        If you keep not blogging, maybe other people will keep reading what you don’t blog?  wha?

      • #3132186

        Why I Don’t Blog

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

        CLARIFICATION – Juggler, I wrote all of it.  My point was that I
        didn’t write it fresh or specifically for this blog.  I copied it
        from an earlier comment I posted to another discussion.  See my
        point about how I like to be precise in my writings; apparently I
        failed again.

        illilli, I’m not into introspection or self-study, but if it works for
        you, more power to you.  I’m not picking on you, but statements
        like “I don’t care if anyone reads it” strike me as a bit
        hypocritical.  If you didn’t care, why would you do it in a public
        forum on the web?  Why not a freeware diary-style utility that
        stores the file privately?  Heck, why not text file?

        Back to you, Three Balls.  So far I think this is a discussion in
        blog’s clothing.  I’m not adding posts on new topics; there are no
        links to anything else.  I’m responding to the comments by private
        message where possible.  I’m only copying the messages here so I
        can keep track of what I said.  I can’t figure out how to carbon
        myself on the private messages.

      • #3132178

        Why I Don’t Blog

        by illilli ·

        In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

        Guilty as charged Palmetto!  I guess I am a hypocrite and do care to some degree.  I should have said, that I don’t care that much.  I “may” want someone specifically to read it and I can link them to it, if so.  I think this discussion in blog clothing is a lot fun at any rate.

      • #3132141

        Why I Don

        by tshinder ·

        In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

        Hey guy,

        You don’t have to be a writer to do a blog. you don’t have to write long posts. My favorite blogs are those that have a paragraph or two on a very specific issue or idea. No need to get deep or have it time consuming. Just think of it as a way to share some ideas with the rest of the world. If no one reads it fine — at least you have a journal of tips and tricks for yourself, which you’ll be able to search through Google to remind yourself! 🙂

        HTH,

        Tom

      • #3117434

        Why I Don’t Blog

        by lmedwards ·

        In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

        hehehe, for not bloggimg your sure did a good job of it. I
        like blogging. I don’t do it a lot but it is very thearapeutic
        and the reason I blog my diary is in hopes that someone might learn
        from my mistakes. Or maybe it will help another just to know that
        somenoe else may be going through something similar or even
        worse. I also made a great friend through a blog. Funny
        huh? I posted to a blog on the net and about a week later I had
        this guy write to me regarding my blog and we have been great e-mail
        buddies every since! He lives across the country but I’m hoping
        maybe one day we might even meet. 🙂 I don’t think blogs
        are such a bad thing. So what if it is the “cool new thing” or so what
        if it is touting ones own life. No man is an island and if blogs
        are helpful to others then I would say that’s a good thing.

        Blog on!!

    • #3209985

      Linux Installation (RH9) – Distro choice

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      At jdclyde’s suggestion, I’m going to post log entries on my latest attempt to learn something about Linux. I’m not comfortable with the web log format, so if I don’t see any personal benefit pretty quickly I probably won’t keep this up.

      I’ve got a choice between Red Hat, Knoppix, and SUSE. Why those three? Because I already have them on CD; other than that I have no reason to select any of these over any other distribution. The Red Hat 9 is on a set of three CD’s my department manager burned two or three years ago. The Knoppix 4.0.2 is a single CD whose origins I have forgotten. The SUSE set of four CDs initially mystified me; see my Q&A at What’s on these SUSE Distro CDs?

      The Knoppix CD boots. While I’m sure it can be installed to the hard drive, a quick scan didn’t reveal an fast easy way to do this. My reasons for selecting RH over SUSE are detailed in the Q&A referenced above. They’re trivial, but at this stage it doesn’t take much to influence me. End of distribution discussion.

      The system is a Compaq with a Pentium 600 (specifically, an EPa/P600e/10b/9/128c), an appx. 7 year old box with a 10Gb hard drive, 512Mb of RAM (the max the system will support), 3.5″ floppy, and CD-R. No burner, no DVD. The only card added to the mother is a 3Com 3C509 NIC; video, drive controllers, audio, etc. are all on the mother. Keyboard, LCD monitor, and mouse are connected via a KVM switch, not directly to the system.

      My initial goal is to get some familiarity with the command line. Next I’d like to add this system as a client to the Windows domain where I work and access shared network resources and the Internet as confidently as I do with XP systems. I am not interested in building any kind of server or running entertainment applications. This is strictly an attempt to replicate the functionality I have with most of the workplace XP desktops I support. These goals probably don’t sound very ambitious to those with Linux expertise, but I’ve failed in two previous attempts.

      Edited to remove manually entered “Entry Date”. I didn’t realize the software did that for me automatically. I told you I wasn’t comfortable with this format. Edited to include hardware specs and goals.  Edited to include more descriptive title.

      • #3209724

        Linux Installation (RH9)

        by jdclyde ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Distro choice

        To tie your posts together, especially something like this that would be a series of posts on the same topic, just use the “add comment” button, the same as if you were replying to someone elses blog.

        Much easier to follow a project if it is in one blog with multiple entries!

        I am off to read your part two to see how things are going!

        jd

    • #3209793

      Linux Installation (RH9) – Installation

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      This is an attempt to recreate an entry that failed to post properly. Since the original text was entered while I was working my way through an Red Hat 9 installation, I may be missing some of the original content. If I have to post entries multiple times, I’ll get tired of this
      quickly. It already takes longer to update the log than it takes to do
      the work. I’ll give this two weeks to see if there are any personal
      advantages.

      This was a default installation for the most part. The installation program detected my USB mouse as a 3-button; I overrode it and selected a wheel mouse instead. I accepted the default “Pesonal Desktop” installation package, rejecting the “Workstation”, “Server”, and “Custom” options. I accepted the default boot loader (GRUB), language (English-US) and time zone (US-Eastern). I turned off the firewall; the machine will only be connecting to the outside world via the company firewall once I get it on the domain.

      After reading 3 CDs and creating a boot diskette, the system rebooted and came up to a Welcome screen. I created a user account with the same username and password as my Windows domain account. I hope matching credentials will make easy to log on to the domain when I add this machine to it. I accepted the correct data and time without enabling a time server, since the machine isn’t connected to anything yet. The setup process detected an Intel 82801AA AC’97 sound card, module i810_audio. Without speakers, I was unable to test this, but at this point I don’t care. I skipped the Red Hat Registration since it required Internet access. I also skipped installing any additional packages. The system responded with a Username prompt.

      Edited to change title; I didn’t know titles had to be unique. My attempt to use the same title on all entries in this series is what caused the original version of this entry to fail to post. Edited to include additional installation and post-installation setup details.  Edited to include more descriptive title.

    • #3209674

      Linux Installation (RH9) – Initial impressions

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      The Nautilus 2.2.1 file management utility doesn’t appear to have a Search capability. I couldn’t find anything on the tool or menu bars. I clicked Help, then Index, to look for “search”. Apparently the index searches the MAN pages, not the Nautilus help files. A manual scan of the Nautilus help table of contents didn’t reveal anything like a search or find topic. I did notice a “Find” option on what I’ll call the “Start Menu”, for lack of a better term.

      The Red Hat default GUI is apparently a Gnome variation.

      A desktop icon labeled “Start Here” shows links to “Applications”, “Preferences”, and “System Settings”. A quick tour through Preferences doesn’t reveal anything surprising. I entered the proxy server settings so that will be ready when I go to put this box on the Windows domain. I also lowered the double-click speed and turned on the system sounds.

      System Setting also contained no surprises. There was an icon for “Network Configuration” that will probably warrant attention shortly.

      The system feels slower than XP on the same hardware, but I haven’t used this class of machine in a while. The comparison may be biased due to my regular use of a Pentium 1.5 gig box.

      I guess my next step is to try to access some Windows domain resources, especially the internet.  It’s probably a mistake to try it this early in my development, but I’m going to reconnect the CAT-5 cable to the NIC and reboot. I’m not sure what I expect to happen, although I don’t expect to get immediately connected to my domain.

      • #3210868

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Initial impressions

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Initial impressions

        Nautilus and Konqeror file managers, usually have the search functionality under the tools menu in the menu bar of the application.

        Yup RH uses GNOME as GUI. in some ways, for your needs, this is the best option, GNOME requires the smbclient library, so it has the needed protocols to connect to windows servers.

      • #3210836

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Initial impressions

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Initial impressions

        Jaqui, I searched the menu bar thoroughly.  Not only is there no search, there isn’t a Tools menu either.  Neither the View menu or the Edit / Preferences dialog have an option to display Tools or enable a search option.  This isn’t crippling at my current level of knowledge, but it’s obviously going to be a pain as I progress.

        Yes, I know there are other file managers available and probably already installed, and that I can always search from a command prompt.  Hopefully by the time I need to search from a GUI (I confess, my preferred environment) I’ll have the skills to replace Nautilus.  I’m just flabbergasted that a file manager apparently doesn’t include a search tool by default.

    • #3210935

      Linux Installation (RH9) – Internet Access

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      I’m finding some of the Yes / No confirmation buttons are reversed from
      what I’m used to. I’m used to “Yes, save the changes” on the left and
      “No, discard” on the right. I don’t mind clicking “No” where I
      expected a “Yes”, but I hope I don’t click “Yes” when I wanted “No”.
      I’m not sure if this is controlled by a common interface used by all
      apps or (gods forbid) is handled individually by each app and may be
      different for each. I’m also having to get use to hitting Enter after my username to get to
      the password screen instead of hitting Tab to move to the next field.

      I reconnected the CAT-5 cable, rebooted the system, and logged on. I clicked on the Red Hat menu icon, then the previously mentioned Network icon under System Settings. The Devices tab showed an Active status on a device eth0, which the Hardware tab shows is my 3Com card. Clicking on the device opened a dialog with several settings I mostly left alone. I noted that the setting for DHCP was checked, which I wanted. The only change I made here was to check the box for “Automatically obtain DNS info from provider.” Finding the fields on the DNS tab already correctly populated, I went back and unchecked the “Auto obtain DNS” box.

      A few minutes with Marcel Gagne’s “Linux System Administration – A User’s Guide” turned up an ” /sbin/config -a ” command. That showed me an IP address for this system, and pinging the host name from my XP box resulted in a response from the same IP address. Apparently there’s some level of connectivity going on. While I don’t maintain any *nix boxes at this location, we have many at our other site and we make a point to load the various services for Unix clients on our Windows servers.

      I started the Mozilla browser to see if it would get anywhere. It defaulted to a Red Hat activation screen. Some people cringe at these but they don’t bother me, especially on a machine I don’t intend as a production box. Clicking on “Activate” resulted in a “Connection terminated” error. A check of Mozilla’s Preferences dialog revealed no proxy settings. Apparently the proxy settings I put in as described in the previous entry do not get used by Mozilla. I clicked the RH icon, then Preferences, then Network Proxy just to be sure the entries were still there. They were, so I’m not sure what apps use them. I left them in place and also entered them in Mozilla. Clicking the “Activate” button in the default RH home page resulted in a prompt for credentials from my proxy server. Unfortunately, no combination of domain, username, or password was accepted by the proxy server.

      Things to do: find out what format to use when entering credentials for my proxy server.  See if there’s a way to pass those creds automatically since they’re the same on both the Linux system and the domain.

      • #3210869

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Internet Access

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Internet Access

        Actually, even in the same application the yes no cancel can be in different locations. I’ve noticed this myself. I just figure that it’s an attempt to make sure you read a dialog rather than click yes or no automatically. They also change the default between dialogs, sometimes it’s yes, sometimes it’s no, so hitting the enter key or space bar to accept the default might not be the desired result.

        you might find that making sure that your system uses the smb protocol for authentication to your companies windows servers will clear up some of the issues.

        generally, Mozilla doesn’t need to have any proxy information in linux, the network control is handled by the kernel nic module. [ I have yet to run into any problems by not specifying proxy info at all ]

        linux networking, the ip data obtained from dhcp is not always kept between sessions, it’s usually best to leave the get data from server option enabled, if dhcp is the network default for ip assignment.

      • #3210830

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Internet Access

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Internet Access

        Thanks.  I -assumed- (yeah, I know) if there was a place to put proxy server entries at what appeared to be the OS level, that applications requiring this information would look there first.

        I’ll toggle the “obtain DNS” back on and keep an eye out for any misbehaviour.

        Regarding SMB authentication, it must be easier than I found on my first attempts a couple of years ago but I’m not ready to stick my toes back in that swamp just yet.  I received multiple conflicting answers on how to get a Linux box to participate as a domain member on a Windows network, including some that said I didn’t need SMB.  I’ve tried TLDP, LinuxQuestions (Enterprise, Network, and Newbie forums) and some other resources but I can’t find a simple “Hey, Windows admins, here’s a step-by-step guide on how to get that Linux box to access files and printers on a Windows 200x server.”

      • #3212291

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Internet Access

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Internet Access

        Well, I’ve never connected linux to a windows powered network so I have no first hand knowledge of using smbclient.
        [ built into gnome, so it should run whenever you do try to connect to a windows server. ]
        I just know that MS servers use the smb protocol over the tcp/ip stack, so connection problems with linux desktops are most likely because of smbclient.
        [ linux networking is natively just the tcp/ip stack, authentication is based on optional settings. ]

        If it doesn’t remember the ip config data, then you’ll need to have the get data from dhcp enabled, if it does remember, it won’t hurt to have it enabled, as it will just check the data and work with what it has.

        one thing I found out, getting the network connection working right is often easier if it’s connected during the install, most linux distros have pretty good detection tools to halp get the network running during install. less manual labour than setting it up afterwards.

    • #3212299

      Linux Installation (RH9) – Search for References

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      I’m trading e-mails with my Linux-capable coworkers, but so far I’m unable to get past our proxy server. It repeatedly prompts me for credentials, apparently rejecting what I enter. I’ve tried username, domain\username, \\domain\username, username@domain, etc. So far, no good.

      I’m also not getting anywhere researching how to access shared resources on my Windows domain (Active Directory, W200x servers in native mode). Based on previous attempt when we had an NT domain, I’m looking at Samba references. The problem is everything I find assumes I want to access a Linux server from a Windows client or server. For example, http://www.samba.org has a “Learn Samba” heading with “Official HOWTO”, “By Example”, and “Using Samba” links. An hour of perusing these three showed lots of ways to access Linux servers from Windows, but I
      could not find the first reference to going the other way. Searching the site for “join Windows domain” gave 6 results; 3 “What’s new in this release” texts, 2 configuration files with no other additional documentation, and a “HOWTO” on (guess what?) giving Windows users right to access a *nix server. Connecting a Linux box to an AD domain must be a common question so it’s discouraging not to find it clearly accessible on the primary site for the program,

      A Google Groups search of “join Windows domain” (without the quotes) at comp.os.linux.networking resulted in 99 hits, mostly for NT domains. Only two appeared to address my question; most pre-dated Active Directory. One from 2001 had three different answers (NIS, Kerberos, Samba). Posters to the other from April 06 at least agreed on Samba; I’d like to note that about half of those respondents were rather condescending. What little advice they offered again gave links that refer to using Samba to connect Windows boxes to Linux servers, including the aforementioned samba.org. This is one of my complaints to using newsgroups and forums for assistance: attempts to search them for answers result in multiple respondents telling you to search for answers. I don’t mind seaching for answers, I mind having to wade through all the hits telling me to do so.

      Perhaps there’s something else I should have configured before I tried this. I don’t know enough yet to know what I don’t know, if you know what I mean. I do know while it’s discouraging encountering difficulty getting info on what I consider a common task, it’s far more discouraging to have to regurgitate the experience on line. So far I’m getting little from Linux but nothing from blogging about it.

      Edited to change to a more appropriate title.  Edited for clarity.

    • #3212193

      Linux Installation (RH9) – Add / Remove Packages

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      The only semi-solid information I gained in my search for domain connectivity information is the apparent need for Samba, although some sources felt that was unnecessary. My first question was whether it was already installed. A check of Main Menu, System Settings, Add/Remove Applications showed it wasn’t. This led to an study of what apps were installed when I selected “Personal Desktop”, and decisions to add some and remove others.

      The “Text-based Internet” group (installed by default) was the first selected to go.  The “Sound and Video” group of apps went next. The “Games and Entertainment” group chased the other two down the hole.

      I started to remove the “Mail Server” group since I’m not interested in running a mail server, but I noticed it had only a single option selected. “sendmail” was described as “A widely used Mail Transport Agent”. I left it on the notion that it may be necessary if I want to access the company’s Exchange 2003 server. All the other options in this group were already disabled.

      A “Windows File Server” group was originally unselected. It contained two items, samba and samba-client, that appeared related to what I’m trying so I selected it. I was surprised to find I had to install these components. Most
      references I’ve read say they were probably installed by default during
      initial setup.

      I left all other package groups alone in their original selected or unselected states.  I clicked Update and immediately got a “Packages Not Found” message. I clicked OK, my only option.  Apparently something I didn’t think I needed was required by something I wanted to keep.

      At that point I hit “Quit”, started over, and only checked “Windows File Server” with it’s two Samba components.  Clicking Update resulted in a prompt for an RH CD. After inserting the CD, I was asked if I with to run /mnt/cdrom/autorun, No / Yes?. I assumed this mounts the CD drive but I’d hate to be a complete home newbie and be presented with this question. I don’t understand the need to manually mount CD and floppy drives. They’re present in the hardware, the OS knows they’re out there; why not automatically do at boot whatever is necessary to use them without further prompting? Must I dismount them? What happens if I don’t?

      The installation proceeded. I then sucessfully removed the “Games and Entertainment” group, followed by “Text-Based Internet” tools.  I tried “Sound and Video” again but the “Packages Not Found” message reappeared, so something I’ve opted to keep needs three apps in that group.  I didn’t know where the undesired “nautilius-cd-burner” or “redhat-config-soundcard” can be found within “Add / Remove Packages”, and I didn’t have a clue what gstreamer-plugins did so I don’t plan to remove it.  Leaving well enough alone, I stopped trying to remove “Sound and Video” group of apps.

      Edited almost immediately for clarity.

      • #3211967

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Add / Remove Packages

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Add / Remove Packages

        The manual mount is an outdated thing, caused by the agre of the version you are using.

        the autorun is usually a windows make install boot floppy / read documentation type display, not actual access to the linux content.

        file not found means that the package manager wasn’t able to access the cd with the required packages.

        linux does require an mta to be installed, it provides native local messaging, you can set up multiple user accounts and email them using it. even if they are all on the one box. it is not required for accessing another mail server to get email.

        I personally use postfix over sendmail, a few more features, same configuration file structure, postfix was designed to be a drop in replacement for sendmail.

        RH9 doesn’t install samba client by default? odd, all current RH versions do, it is required for gnome.

      • #3211940

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Add / Remove Packages

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Add / Remove Packages

        It may install it for one of the other installation options, but it didn’t for “Personal Desktop”.  In addition to first checking “Add / Remove”, I also tried “man samba” and “man smb.conf”.  Both yielded “No manual entry for ….”, and both worked after my “Add / Remove” adventure.  Apparently it wasn’t required for this version of Gnome.  My attempt to find out what version of Gnome is installed ( rpm -q gnome ) gave back “package gnome is not installed”.  RH must have renamed it when they reskinned it.

      • #3211225

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Add / Remove Packages

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Add / Remove Packages

        Gnome 1.2 or 1.4 will be the version installed.

        current Gnome is 2.4 I believe.

        Linux Format Magazine for this month has a double sided dvd, with a full 7 distros on it, Fedora 5 [ Red Hat ], Suse 10.1, and 5 Live cd versions.

        two of the live cd versions aren’t bootable from the dvd, they are iso files for burning to cd.
        cost is about 20 bucks.

        The Mag has install article for Fedora 5.

        as well as other articles, and a bunch more software.

        Fedora 5 is 3.8 Gigs on dvd, so it has everything. with the newer software versions you may find far fewer issues with getting a learning system to do what you want.

      • #3211216

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Add / Remove Packages

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Add / Remove Packages

        jdclyde sent me an e-mail pointing me to http://free.thelinuxstore.ca/ and suggested I have them mail me DVD’s for free. While I did explain in the first posting in this series that the box I’m using has only a CD drive, I didn’t point out that I don’t have -any- DVD drives in the building, excluding the ones in laptop multi-bays. Yes, I can get one, but it won’t be anytime soon. While I have no problem getting purchases approved, I don’t have an expense account and I’m frankly not spending my money on this project.

        I’m not sure why I’m being encouraged to load another distro already. I’ve only been running RH9 a week and it appears all my problems are related to ignorance, not the distribution. No, Samba wasn’t loaded by default, but loading it was similar to adding a Windows component.   Will my bigger problems of not knowing what to do with Samba and not knowing if it’s even the right tool be cured by loading a newer distribution?

      • #3169100

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Add / Remove Packages

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Add / Remove Packages

        It’s more the improvements in the software will make it much easier for you.

        as I mentioned, GNOME 2.x includes the samba tools as a requirement, so the functionality with a windows based server is better.

        at free.thelinuxstore.ca you can specify cdrom instead of dvd, since they are using the freely downloadable version which comes in both formats.

        the 6 month release cycle employed by most linux distributions is a result of the speed at which there have been improvements in the software. RH9 came out in 2000, so it’s literally closer to windows 3.1.1 for comparitive ages.
        current linux distros are very little difference from both macosx and windows xp.
        [ look and feel wise, depending on gui, gnome being osx look, kde being windows look ]
        This is why people saying linux is hard to install or use from looking at it in the 1990’s is useless information, their information is antiquated.

        if you got samba and, more importantly, samba client to install, then you should be able to get the documentation to install, which will be some help. [ maybe not much, but it will be for the version you have so it’s better than none. ]

    • #3212152

      Linux Installation (RH9) – Internet Access 2

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      Okay, I’ve been taking the wrong approach.

      When I started Mozilla, it opened a locally-stored Red Hat registration page. When I clicked a link on that page to go to Red Hat’s site, I was repeatedly prompted for credentials by my proxy server.

      So I decided to abandon that. I opened Mozilla, manually entered the URL for a different site, and after I entered my creds I connected successfully. Apparently something about the links off the default home page is giving heartburn to something in the route.

      I’d hoped to post this entry from the RH box but that wasn’t to be. When I went to TR Mozilla successfully displayed the site’s home, but all I get is blank pages if I try to go “My Blog”, “My Discussions”, or “My Workspace”. “My Tech Q&A” seems to work but I can’t decide if I should post a question or try to install Firefox.  A search of TR’s Q&A didn’t reveal anything useful, so I’ll post the Mozilla question and see what happens.

      • #3211968

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Internet Access 2

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Internet Access 2

        I’m using Mozilla Seamonkey, the current version of the Mozilla suite Browser, and TR works just fine for me.

        I have accessed TR with Mozilla going as far back as version 1.4 with no problems, so it doesn’t seem likely that it is a Mozilla issue.

    • #3211373

      Linux Installation (RH9) – Firefox Download & Install

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      TheChas’ answer suggests I need a couple of plug-ins so Mozilla will display TR properly. I found Flash and Java plugins at mozdev.org. The Java plug-in notes said to install it (how?) and create a symbolic link (how?). The Flash plug-in said to decompress it (how?). I suspect I’ll have to develop these skills to install Firefox too, so I’ve decided to abandon the Mozilla upgrade effort.

      Downloading FF from the website was routing, and a “firefox-1.5.0.4.tar.gz” file appeared in my /home/username directory. (No, the account is not called ‘username’, but I’m not displaying the real name here.) For giggles I double-clicked the file. A “File Roller” window opened with a single “Firefox” folder displayed in the main portion of the window. File Roller’s Help file says it’s file archive tool; additional Help reading shows it to be similar to my old buddies PKZip and WinZip. I clicked the Extract button, accepted /home/username as the destination, and clicked OK. As expected, I got Firefox folder in /home/username to keep the download company. If I had extracted the files from a .ZIP file I wouldn’t hesitate to delete the .ZIP; I moved firefox-1.4.0.4.tar.gz to the Trash icon, assuming if I needed it for anything else I drag it back out.

      Sometime during this process I got an error message unrelated to the file extraction. “The Notification Area applet appears to have died unexpectedly. Reload this applet?” I notice the what a Windows user would call the Taskbar was missing. I clicked Yes and it returned. I’m assuming this applet is a part of this Red Hat variation of Gnome.

      I went back to Add / Remove Packages and deselected Mozilla. While I was there I ditched evolution, gaim, mozilla-mail, mozilla-psm pan, and xchat. With the exception of e-mail and SSL support, I don’t use corresponding apps on my Windows box. I don’t know if mozilla-mail is compatible with Exchange 2003, but I’ll put it back if I need it. I assume Firefox will feature it’s own SSL support. The uninstall didn’t raise any dependency issues.

      Dependencies remind me of “.DLL Hell”.

      I opened the new Firefox folder looking for a setup.exe file or something similar. No go, but I did spot a readme.txt. It referred me to a website for installation help, but my attempt to copy the URL with CTRL-C and paste it with CTRL-V was unsuccessful. I clicked the Edit menu and the Cut, Copy, and Paste option were disabled. More interested in the FF install than learning to cut and paste, I entered the URL manually. Clicking Support, then FAQs led to “How Do I Install Firefox?”, followed by “Release Notes”, followed by a grocery list of release numbers. I assumed the number in the middle of the “firefox-1.5.0.4.tar.gz” filename was the release number and clicked the matching link. The release notes had an “Installing” link; now we were getting somewhere.

      No, we weren’t. The only instructions for a Linux install said to extract the tarball ( tar -xzvf firefox-1.5.0.4.tar.gz) to create a firefox subdirectory. I assumed this was the command line way to do what File Roller had already done, and that I was apparently trying to do something I didn’t need to do at all. A second look at the release notes didn’t reveal a “Running” link between the “Installing” and “Uninstalling” links. I went back to the Firefox folder on my hard drive and looked for a firefox.exe file. Not spotting one, I ran a search for firefox.exe; also no luck. “man firefox” was equally unsuccessful.

      Apparently I don’t know what I’m looking for. I’m also not sure where rpm fits into this operation.  Time for some research to find out the Linux equivilent to what the Windows world calls an .exe file.

      Edited to include “man firefox” and rpm remarks.

      • #3211233

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Firefox Download & Install

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Firefox Download & Install

        Dependencies remind me of “.DLL Hell”.

        Naturally, that is exactly what they are.

        To install Firefox,
        [ I had to go grab the thing, I don’t use it myself ]

        1) open a terminal session
        2) su
        3) enter root password at the password prompt
        4) cp firefox /usr/local/
        *note, this can be done using the file manager in super user mode or logging in as root to the gui, making it a drag and drop operation

        the file “firefox” in the firefox folder is a shell script that launches the browser
        you can launch it from the /home/username/firefox/
        if you don’t feel like moving or copying it to the /usr [ Program Files ]
        The tarball that you got from the website just needs unpacking, as you have already done, to have it ready to run.

      • #3211206

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Firefox Download & Install

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Firefox Download & Install

        1) open a terminal session
        2) su
        3) enter root password at the password prompt
        4) cp firefox /usr/local/

        cp: omitting directory ‘firefox’

        Since I don’t see a firefox directory in /usr/local I guess that was unsuccessful. I checked the man page for cp but I couldn’t see anything wrong with the command. Apparently I’m specifying either the origin or destination incorrectly (or both), but neither the man page nore Gagne have examples.

        Are there advantages to moving the folder to /usr/local or it is a “Best Practice” to have applications there?

        On the positive side, double-clicking ‘firefox’ does start the app. For future reference, how can I tell what file is the one I need? Does the concept of “installing” as a Windows user understands it (a program to copy files to the appropriate directories, create shortcut icons, prompt for any initial options and parameters, etc) apply at any time or am I trying to make work where it doesn’t exist?

        Based on your love of Red Hat, I don’t suppose you know where rpm is supposed to fit in this equation.

      • #3169103

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Firefox Download & Install

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Firefox Download & Install

        with it in /usr/local if you have multiple user accounts on the box, they all have access to run it.
        in /home/username only the person that installed it can use it.

        ahh, yeah, forgot the mkdir /usr/local/firefox isn’t an automatic feature with red hat products

      • #3168923

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Firefox Download & Install

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Firefox Download & Install

        mkdir /usr/local/firefox

        did create a directory in the appropriate place, but

        cp firefox /usr/local/

        still resulted in

        cp: omitting directory ‘firefox’

        A quick check of the info page gave me a -r option required to move directories and the command worked.  Equally important, the “My Blog” and “My Discussions” pages at TR now appear properly formatted.

    • #3168913

      Linux Installation (RH9) – More Initial Impressions

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      The Nautilis file management tool doesn’t seem to save my display preferences (list of files, not icons; folder tree on left instead of a single folder icon, etc.).

      When I start a GUI app that requires root priv, and I Cancel out of the password prompt, I always get an “Unknown exit code.” error.

      The apropos command gives so much information about the requested terms as to be useless.  I entered

      apropos change user password

      in an attempt to find out what command to use to change my password but got several hundred results.  I had high hopes for this command as a way to help me locate other commands as I needed them, but I’m probably going to abandon it.

      New goal – get access to my Windows AD domain home directory.

      • #3277378

        Linux Installation (RH9) – More Initial Impressions

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – More Initial Impressions

        the command, to change a user password, in command line:

        password [username] [new password]

        in the gui there is, I beleive, under the System menu a set of configuration tools, that do require the root password, that will allow for gui based password changing.

    • #3277581

      Linux Installation (RH9) – Access Windows Domain Shares

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      Nothing I accomplished so far is new to me; I’ve just been refreshing old experiences. Now I’ve reached the point where I usually start having major problems and quit in despair.

      I want to be able to access the files on our Windows domain with this computer. Several hours of web searching this morning resulted in no worthwhile content. “access Windows domain” has failed to return anything I recognize as useful at TLDP, LinuxQuestions, TR, comp.os.linux, Samba.org, or any of so many other sites I can’t remember them all.  I’d suspect the age of RH9 as a factor but I had these same problems when I tried this three years ago.  It’s more likely I don’t have the technical volcabulary to understand what the resouces are telling me; especially the man pages for the Samba apps.

      I’ve posted a question here at TR in hopes someone points me toward a useful resource. I wonder if this task is too advanced for me to tackle yet and if there is something else I should learn first.

      Again edited almost immediately for clarity.

      • #3279121

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Access Windows Domain Shares

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Access Windows Domain Shares

        I don’t think I have the prerequisite knowledge to do this. A look at an entry at LinuxQuestions’ Enterprise forum shows there are more pieces to this puzzle than I suspected. Authenticating, mounting, ldap, kerberos, pam (whoever she is), etc. I’ll have to break this into bite-sized pieces, then determine which ones to chew first.

        I did have some minor success with smbclient, a utility I somehow missed in my previous attempts.  I was able to get access to my Windows home directory with a simple ‘smbclient //server/share’. The man page describes it as similar to ftp. Unfortunately, I’ve never used FTP outside of a GUI so I don’t know the command syntax for it either. If I can figure out how to access an individual file, maybe I can open it in an application; say, a Word file in whatever the OpenOffice equivilent is.

        I’d like to get this sucker connected to a printer so I can print some man pages, but then I have no idea how to start the print job.

      • #3278985

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Access Windows Domain Shares

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Access Windows Domain Shares

        I don’t think I have the prerequisite knowledge to do this. A look at an entry at LinuxQuestions’ Enterprise forum
        shows there are more pieces to this puzzle than I suspected.
        Authenticating, mounting, ldap, kerberos, pam (whoever she is), etc.
        I’ll have to break this into bite-sized pieces, then determine which
        ones to chew first.

        mounting is adding a filesystem to the local host for accessing the content., using smbclient you can mount a remote shared filesystem / folder for local access.

        Authenticating is login.
        ldap, kerberos are protocols for authentication, though you can use kerberos authentication to access an ldap server.
        pam = Plugable Authentication Module, and is the base for a lot of authentication schema used in linux. using a pam modular application, you can use any of the 20 different authentication schemas available.

        want to use an md5 encrypted postgresql database powered domain authentication, there’s a pam module for it.

        Since what you want is more the client than the server, you only need to look at what your company network is using protocol wise for authentication of workstations, then use the linux system that has that protocol available.

      • #3278975

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Access Windows Domain Shares

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Access Windows Domain Shares

        As usual, a poorly phrased log entry leads to a misinterpreted message.

        I know what these objects are in terms of what they do (except pam). What I lack is practical experience or even textbook knowledge of how to use them. The Windows “net use x: //server/share” is the closest I’ve come to mounting a drive since my DCL days in the ’80’s. That’s the research I have to do; how to manipulate these objects.

        What I’m not clear on is the term “filesystem” as used in a Linux context. I’m used to “file system” (two words) in an MS context as the method / protocol for organizing data on a hard drive – FAT, FAT32, NTFS, and whatever they had in mind but dropped from Vista. I have to reread the section on that Gagne’s “Linux System Administration”; it didn’t make a whole lot of sense initially. I came away thinking it was similar to “resource”, but I don’t want to work from a false impression.

        I withdrew the previously mentioned question from TR Q&A after two days with no response. I did find a reference at Linux.com that may help with the authentication issue.

        Edited to include “filesystem” comments.

      • #3278348

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Access Windows Domain Shares

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Access Windows Domain Shares

        I wonder why I keep using my Windows box to post entries to this log when I’ve got access to it from my Linux box.  I think that’s significant, but I don’t know why.

        A little research turned up the smbmount command, giving me access to the network shared resource from the GUI and from the command line outside the confines of the smbclient command.  I had trouble grasping one of the smbmout parameters, the “mount point”.  I’m used to assigning a letter to a shared resource, not picking a directory and setting the share subordinate to it.  This site did a decent job of clearing much of my confusion.

    • #3278337

      Linux Installation (RH9) – Locked out of /home/username

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      After three tries in four years to access Windows domain resources from a Linux computer, I’ve finally had some success. Apparently it comes at the cost of an operational system.

      I did some more reading on mount points at the link I referenced in my last comment to the previous entry. When I tried to look at the /etc/fstab file fby double-clicking on it in Nautilus, I got an error “Unable to start Text Viewer”. Being a Windows baby, I rebooted the system. When I logged back on I got the error:

      Please contact your system administrator to resolve the following problem:
      Could not open or create the file “/home/username/.gconf-test-locking-file”; this indicates that there may be a problem with your configuration, as many programs will need to create files in your home directory. The error was “Permission denied” (emo = 13)

      Apparently I’ve locked myself out of my home directory. Odd, since I don’t have any idea how to manage file or folder security yet. I’d contact my system administrator, but since I’m him …

      The last command I remember entering successfully was “smbmount //server/share /home/username”. I’m posting this one as a Q&A.

      Edited to include tags, Q&A link, cynical comments, more descriptive title.

      • #3278199

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Error message

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Locked out of /home/username

        I’m going to view this as an opportunity to test the celebrated
        “community support” system.  I admit to having a negative outlook on
        this form of support in terms of the number of inaccurate responses
        before getting a correct solution, and the amount of time before
        getting that solution.

        I’ve already had one response to the question I posted here at TR, but the solution (delete the user account) won’t help me learn what I did wrong.

        After searching their site for “smbmount ‘permission denied’, ” I also posted this problem to LinuxQuestions in the Newbie forum.

        LinuxQuestions at least returned some results to my search.  LinuxSelfhelp.com had no results for the single word “smbmount”.  I didn’t bother to create an account to post my question.

        A search using Google’s Linux-specific search tool didn’t have anything useful in the first 50 results.  A Google search of comp.os.linux turned up only 17 results for “smbmount”, none helpful.

        There’s probably plenty of resources I’m not aware of, but so far I’m striking out. Hopefully I get some more answers here and at LinuxQuestions.

      • #3278158

        Linux Installation (RH9) – Error message

        by charliespencer ·

        In reply to Linux Installation (RH9) – Locked out of /home/username

        I received two replies at LinuxQuestions in under an hour.  This has taken some of the edge off my attitude, but I’m still not convinced this is the way to get support for a corporate installation.  Of course, I haven’t purchased any support yet since I’m still in the learning stage, so I guess that’s not a valid criticism.  More on the subject of community support further down.

        Shutting the system down instead of merely rebooting it fixed the problem.  Apparently I’m not supposed to mount shares directly under my home directory, but use a subdirectory instead.  I’m still trying to figure out what restrictions there are on a mount point.  Can I mount multiple shares in the same subdirectory?  Can I have other files in that sub and still be able to access them?

        One of my concerns with community support is the lack of agreement.  In my first post in this log entry I left out some information.  When I first tried the smbmount command

        smbmount //server/share /home/username

        I got the error

        “smbmnt must be installed suid root for direct user mounts (500,500)”

        I Googled the error and followed instructions at http://tinyurl.com/naseq. As su I ran

        chmod u+s /usr/bin/smbmnt /usr/bin/smbumount

        then as my user account I successfully reran the smbmount command.  According to the feedback at LinuxQuestions, I should not have run the chmod to allow my user account access to the smbmount command. The suggestion there was I log on as root and modify the /etc/fstab file.  I had planned to do this after I tested the smbmount command, but thought I should test the connection manually before putting it in what I interpret as a startup file.

    • #3278569

      Why I don’t blog revisited.

      by charliespencer ·

      In reply to Why I Don’t Blog

      At the suggestion of jdclyde, I’ve spent the last several days logging my latest attempts with Linux. I said I’d give “blogging” a couple of weeks, and I figure this is close enough.

      Copying two of the points from my first entry into this log,

      “I don’t want to take the time to do it right. I’m something of a
      stickler for details and verbal accuracy. I feel it would take longer
      to get my facts straight and express them clearly than it would really
      be worth.

      Opportunity costs are also a consideration. I already feel a bit guilty
      about the time I spend on this site while at work, but I can justify it
      to myself as professional interaction. I don’t feel the same about
      original authorship on company time, and I’m not going to do it on my
      time at the house.”

      The first of the two above has certainly proved true. It takes me over twice as long to compose a coherent log entry as it takes me to perform the activity I’m documenting, and frankly it really isn’t any fun. I’ve long felt that this is why open source documentation often sucks: it’s a lot more entertaining to write code that to write manuals, especially when you’re not getting compensated. I’ll keep notes on what I’m doing in a text file, where I don’t have to use complete sentences, provide all details, or explain my decisions. It’ll be a great way to learn vi.

      I’m not abandoning Linux, I’m just not writing log entries about it anymore. I’ve got the four-DVD Fedora Core 5 on order from The Linux Store and I’ll be replacing RH9 as soon as it gets here. Why Fedora? At my company’s other site they run RH Enterprise on software development and testing machines. Fedora comes close enough to that for my learning purposes. Why on order? Because I don’t want to hog the company bandwidth pulling down the .ISOs, burn the CD’s, etc.

      Thanks to Jaqui for his feedback. I’ll probably nag you some more here at TR, or by private mesage if you don’t mind. Thanks to jdclyde for the suggestion; please excuse me, but I have not found keeping a web log to be a rewarding use of my time.

      • #3110628

        Why I don’t blog revisited.

        by jaqui ·

        In reply to Why I don’t blog revisited.

        No problem.
        Ask away in whichever method you want.

        Fedora is RHEL, minus a few admin tools / commercial software options, so it’s not really “close enough to” it is. 😀

        in answer to a question you made in passing about mount points, you can place files into them, they are just a folder in the filesystem.
        if you mount something there, then any content is not available.

        the normal publicly [ non root ] accessable place for mounting any resource is [ depending on distro defaults ] either /mnt or /media

        /mnt/cdrom/ or /mdeia/cdrom/ is where the cd would be mounted when you have a cd in the drive.

        same with a digital camera, or zip drive or floppy drive.

        you can also mount every single section of the partition structure into multiple locations if you want.

        root is the only account that can create mount points outside of the /home/username/ space [ commonly ~ ]

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