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Win2K Standard Server & a Backup Server

By azamup ·
Hello,

I have recently installed a win2k server promoting the old NT4 PDC. Now AD has been configured successfully.....am facing the following issues

1. During the W2k AD installation of very 1st time I have renamed the domain from abc to xyz.com coz my first domain name was not fully qualified domain name now when I add some new user it is no more getting authentication from abc but xyz.com how this delima can be solved?

2. As there's no concept of BDC in Win2K, if my fist DC got crashed (Blue Screen of Death) than what to do with my existing SAM & SIDs how can I get all the time a mirrored copy of the same server like i do in NT4 BDC & PDC stuff. How to maintain 2 Win2k servers having both user's sync copies all the time. This is only to get the existing user's back while my DC is down for any mainteance/repair

Best Regards,


Azam

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by centauri In reply to Win2K Standard Server & a ...

When you create your AD domain, it allows for the naming of the legacy (NT style) domain which can be used by older clients. Unless you changed this during the AD creation, it generally defaults to XYZ without the ".com". You can name the legacy domain anything you wish during the AD creation, but I don't belive you can rename it without destroying the AD forest.

While there is no BDC in Active Directory, it allows for a number of distributed domain controllers which serve the same function. Unlike Win NT, any AD domain controller can serve in place of any other domain controller, so if one domain controller is offline, the others can both authenicate users and accept changes to the AD. Of course, there are exceptions involving the Flexible Single Master Operators (FSMO) which are normally on the first domain controller created in the forest/domain, but can be moved to other domain controllers if needed or desired.

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by centauri In reply to Win2K Standard Server & a ...

When you create your AD domain, it allows for the naming of the legacy (NT style) domain which can be used by older clients. Unless you changed this during the AD creation, it generally defaults to XYZ without the ".com". You can name the legacy domain anything you wish during the AD creation, but I don't belive you can rename it without destroying the AD forest.

While there is no BDC in Active Directory, it allows for a number of distributed domain controllers which serve the same function. Unlike Win NT, any AD domain controller can serve in place of any other domain controller, so if one domain controller is offline, the others can both authenicate users and accept changes to the AD. Of course, there are exceptions involving the Flexible Single Master Operators (FSMO) which are normally on the first domain controller created in the forest/domain, but can be moved to other domain controllers if needed or desired.

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by timwalsh In reply to Win2K Standard Server & a ...

Okay, to clear up a few things:

When an AD domain is created, you can apply whatever domain name you wish. It is also assigned a second (NetBIOS) domain name for those clients that don't understand AD (versions of Windows prior to Win2K). By default, the NetBIOS domain name is the portion of the AD domain name prior to the TLD extension (.com). You can change this at the time the domain is created, but not afterword.

But there is a trick. You can only change the NetBIOS domain name from the default if you create an AD domain from scratch.

If you migrate an NT4 domain to AD, the NetBIOS domain name defaults to the old NT domain name and CANNOT be changed. This is so all clients on the old domain will recognize the new domain.

Domain Controllers (DCs) - In AD, you can create as many DCs as you wish. All DCs are essentially coequals (with a few exeptions). All security/user account information is maintained in AD. AD is replicated amongst all DCs in a domain. A major difference between an AD DC and the NT4 PDC/BDC is that the NT4 BDC had a read-only copy of the SAM database as it existed on the PDC. The AD database is writable on all DCs.

Hope this helps.

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