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Windows 2000 Server sharing

By Infohill ·
Internet access and assinging fixed IPs??
How can I do that?
I'm new on NT and have a network with 7 win 95 stations and 1 W2K pro, Also a 2 hubs 8 ports each and a Router linked to a T1 conection, all running a NT 4.5 Back Office Small Business.

I need to build a new server (W2K server) conected to this router and provide internet access to the other server (NT Back office, or get rid of it if better) and be able to host 8 diferents web sites and also run a domanin permiting the onwer and some managers to access the network in the office then use as a regular ISP to get into the internet from any were.

It all may be simple but is hard for me that just started on NT last year.

I would appeciate any help on this task that I haveto perform until the end of january.

Thanks,

Claudio

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Windows 2000 Server sharing

by Infohill In reply to Windows 2000 Server shari ...

PS: I Have 64 Fixed IP addresses from my ISP wich gives me the T1.

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Windows 2000 Server sharing

by gbworld In reply to Windows 2000 Server shari ...

This is an easy problem to solve. You just need to break down the three parts.

1. You have 64 addresses. Go ahead and figure out which machines you want to assign these too.

a) Configure your router with 1 of the addresses on the internal side. This is the gateway address for the other machines.

b) Configure one machine with DNS (unless your ISP offers you DNS for accessing Internet addresses). This is the DNS address.

64 addresses tells me that you are using CIDR. Depending on yournetworking equipment, you may or may not be able to use the outside 2 addresses (one for broadcast and one for this node). You can check with your ISP, but the subnet should be 255.255.255.192.

There is still a reason you might not want to use all 64 and create an Internal network with one of the reserved IANA blocks (like the class A 10.0.0.0/8 block). The reason is that it allows you to grow, to add a proxy server and it also allows you to use the 64 addresses for future Internet sites andother external servers (outside of your network).

The easiest will probably be to go ahead and start setting up the network with the 64 addresses right now. You may want to change it sooner, but you only have a few clients on the network right now, so you still have plenty of room for growth.

The main thing you have to check is to make sure you set the subnet mask correctly. Set improperly, you will not be able to communicate properly.

Here is a great site to look at for all of your NT needs:

http://www.ntfaq.com

Gregory A. Beamer
MCP: +I, SE, SD, DBA

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Windows 2000 Server sharing

by Infohill In reply to Windows 2000 Server shari ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Windows 2000 Server sharing

by dan In reply to Windows 2000 Server shari ...

Right up front, you have a lot bigger problem than you see here. If you using the features of SBS, you better do a good evaluation of the requirements of that OS before you start messing with the architecture.
To answer your question, turn on ICS,Internet Connection Sharing of the W2K machine and skip assigning fixed IP's. Make sure your SBS computer is not on the sharing side of ICS if it's DHCP is enabled.

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Windows 2000 Server sharing

by Infohill In reply to Windows 2000 Server shari ...

The question was auto-closed by TechRepublic

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Windows 2000 Server sharing

by Infohill In reply to Windows 2000 Server shari ...

This question was auto closed due to inactivity

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